Scholarship photograph

5 Fox School students and alumni share how scholarships changed their lives

Margaret (Meg) McGoldrick

BBA ’74, MBA ’77, President, Abington-Jefferson Health & Member, Fox School Dean’s Council

“I had the opportunity (in April) to meet with a dozen Fox students and they are so impressive,” says McGoldrick on a recent meeting of the Fox School Dean’s Council. “They are articulate and clear communicators. They show enthusiasm, politeness, and creativity. They attend Fox with a purpose, many of them to start their own businesses once they graduate. You can see that drive within them. Whenever I meet Fox students, I come away with a stronger understanding of why I invest in the school’s future.”

Charles Atangana

Class of 2019, Finance major

“The scholarship I received was valuable and significant to me because it off set the amount I needed to borrow to finance my education and pursue a BBA in my desired field. Once I graduate, I plan to use my finance degree to pursue a career in the music entertainment industry, and this wouldn’t be possible without the aid of the Johnson family and their scholarship.”

Kevin Johnson

BBA ’80, Vice President of Finance Transformation, Coca-Cola (retired) & Member, Fox School Dean’s Council

“Between contributions from my parents and my work-study program, I funded part of my education—but I still came out of the Fox School with debt. Today, I have a duty to give back to a place that gave me a foundation for a successful business career. Most people tend to think they need to write a seven-figure check to make a difference. That’s certainly not the case. Others need to know that we’re all capable of making a difference for the future generation with whatever we are able to contribute.”

Kristina Abi-Daher

Class of 2019, Accounting major

“Access to scholarships made the Fox School more attractive to me. I worked a job throughout high school, and that made my life more difficult than it needed to be. I didn’t have any flexibility in my schedule, or the ability to focus solely on my education. Now, my schedule isn’t nearly as complicated and I can dedicate myself to my education.”

Johanna Walters

BBA ’00, Senior Vice President, Merrill Lynch Wealth Management

“I’m from a blue-collar Midwestern town, and my husband Brian (Sweeney, MBA ’01) and I both came from humble beginnings. We identify with the struggle of having to finance education, as well as the associated cost of not working in order to pursue a degree. It can be a heavy cost to the student. We firmly believe that education is one of best returns on investment. We established a scholarship at the Fox School to make students’ paths through college a little easier.”

This story was originally published in Fox Focus, the Fox School’s alumni magazine.

Fox Veterans associated image

The Fox School and Temple University is a thriving community of veterans, both current students and alumni. Between 2013 and 2017, 249 veterans earned degrees at the Fox School. And there are currently more than 400 veterans and veterans dependents enrolled. Since its founding 100 years ago, thousands of veterans have chosen to study business at the Fox School. To celebrate these business leaders’ commitments to their country, learn more about these accomplished Fox vets.

1. Edna Tuttleman, BS ’42

Back when Edna Tuttleman (1921-2013) was at Temple, the Fox School was called the School of Commerce. Tuttleman, who claimed her time here was “the most exciting period of my life,” became the university’s first female class president in 1939. Upon completion of her business degree, during World War II, Tuttleman joined the Navy’s Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service program. She eventually earned the rank of Lieutenant (junior grade). Professionally, she went on to run design operations at a clothing firm owned by her husband, Stanley Tuttleman.

Temple Lover: A longtime donor and trustee, the Tuttleman Learning Center is named after her and was made possible by gifts from the Tuttleman Family Foundation.

Art Lover: Edna and Stanley Tuttleman were collectors of art, and their name adorns the Tuttleman Gallery at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Their collection included works by Roy Lichtenstein, Fernando Botero, and Alexander Calder.

2. Dorothy S. Washburn, SMC ’31, MBA ’50

Dorothy Washburn (1909-1985), West Philadelphia born and raised, earned a BS from what is now the Klein College of Media and Communication, and an MBA from the Fox School. Her government career began during World War II when she worked as a clerk at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. She held several positions in the military and won outstanding service awards from the Army and the Air Force, for which she served as a Reserve Lieutenant Colonel. She also worked in Washington, D.C., for the Office of the Secretary of the Navy.

Fact: The Washburn Chair in Marketing, named after Dorothy S. Washburn, is presently held by Dr. Masaaki Kotabe.

Active Life: Washburn served on the board of the Philadelphia League of Women Voters and was a member of both Temple University’s Board of Managers and Temple’s Board of the General Alumni Association.

3. Mark J. Fung, MBA ’11

Rear Admiral Mark Fung joined the Navy in 1988 and he was deployed in support of Operation Desert Storm and the War on Terrorism. He currently works for the Naval Facilities Engineering Command as deputy chief of civil engineers and deputy commander. For his service, Fung has earned the Legion of Merit and the Bronze Star Medal. In his civilian life, Fung works as a project manager for AmerisourceBergen. 

Wise Words: “Life is too short to do something you don’t enjoy. I enjoyed my time at Temple, and at Fox, and I enjoy my work with the Navy. That’s the secret. What drives me, especially at this level of the Navy, where the stakes are high, is that there’s no room for second place. Even in the business world, you make decisions that affect the outcome of those who work for you and with you. It’s this responsibility to my team that makes me strive to perform at a higher level.”

4. Anthony McIntyre, BBA ’80

Following Anthony McIntyre’s time at the Fox School and Temple University—where he also played football and track and field—he was commissioned as a U.S. Army Reserve Officer and then spent several years as Company Commander of a floating craft company. Professionally, he worked for several years at the Graham Company and Xerox Corporation, before founding the McIntyre Group, an insurance brokerage firm, in 2002.

Temple Family: McIntyre’s wife, Christine, is an STHM graduate. His brother, Michael, earned his MBA from the Fox School.

Wise Words: “Nothing takes the place of persistence, hard work, and integrity. If you get knocked down, get back up. And take risks—with no risk, comes no reward.”

5. Paul Abrams, MBA ’16

Army Staff Sergeant Paul Abrams is the founder of RTB Limited, a soft skills training, and business consultancy. “We help fill the gap in startups to medium-sized businesses who don’t have the budget for a full training department,” says Abrams, who earned his MBA at the Fox School in 2016. 

Best Fox Memory: “I loved exposing my cohort members to professional rugby while visiting South Africa for my Executive MBA cohort’s Global Immersion trip. Rugby is a sport I am extremely passionate about; I played and coached for 15 years in the Army and for high-level clubs here in the U.S. Now that a league is starting here, I’d love to start a professional rugby team.”

Wise Words: “My discipline and attention to detail help me be a better leader in both business and the military. I also carry over the Army mantra ‘Be, Know, and Do.’ This creates a line of succession and constant training and communication in any business.

6. Joseph Petro, BS ’66

After earning his degree at the Fox School in 1966, Joseph Petro served as an officer in the U.S. Navy River Patrol Forces until 1970, including one year in Vietnam with River Division 512. He was discharged from the Navy as a Lieutenant. He has since worked as a special agent and senior executive in the U.S. Secret Service—Petro recounted these experiences, including his years alongside President Ronald Reagan, in his book, Standing Next to History: An Agent’s Life Inside the Secret Service—and a managing director at Citigroup. He is currently a senior vice president at Time Warner, Inc.

Wise Words: “Don’t be afraid to take chances—have confidence in yourself and work harder than everyone else.”

This story was originally published in Fox Focus, the Fox School’s alumni magazine.

Jameel Rush photo

“I want to make sure everyone has the opportunity to be successful,” says Jameel Rush, BBA ’07 and adjunct professor at the Fox School. “Barriers to success for individuals and businesses exist. What drives my passion is creating those opportunities and ways to overcome those barriers to help organizations tap into every resource they can.” 

As associate vice president of Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) for Aramark, Rush leads D&I programs and initiatives across three areas: workforce, workplace and marketplace. He works to ensure that the company hires talent with backgrounds that reflect the communities the company serves, the culture values differences and drives innovation through inclusion and that they partner with diverse suppliers.

Aramark, a leader in food, facilities management and uniforms, has been recognized for diversity and inclusion efforts by organizations including the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s 2019 Corporate Equality Index (CEI), Diversity, Inc. and BLACK ENTERPRISE

Rush has played a significant role in making these achievements possible by working to highlight the possibilities for an organization that is highly inclusive and attracts talent across all walks of life. Along with making executives understand the business case for diversity, he investigates the importance of things like the language used in job postings, how culture and process effect talent recruitment and how diversity in suppliers helps to drive profits. 

In 2013 when he first joined Aramark, his interest in D&I was born. He was on a team responsible for designing, developing, implementing and managing an employee resource for young professionals focused on specific issues that impact them. “I fell in love with inclusion work once I was exposed to the industry,” he explains. The next year, he took the next step in his career and was named director of diversity and inclusion for the company. 

At the Fox School, Rush teaches courses in organizational leadership and business ethics. In this role, he blends his real-world experiences into lessons for students. But he does not have to force the issue, as topics like D&I often come up naturally because they are ingrained in the lives and courses of the modern college student. 

“We discuss issues like unconscious bias and discrimination—what they look like and how they function in today’s culture—and the importance of organizational policies to combat them from an ethical and a business standpoint.” 

The most important piece of advice Rush would give students and prospective students looking in his footsteps is to network, network, network. He suggests being intentional about maintaining those relationships and building an authentic brand in order to be remembered.

“Everyone has their own unique path,” he says. “Mine is one of many. But my opportunities have come from making friends and associates. If you get your name out there and do good work, a lot can happen.” 

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Moving the Needle illustration
Illustration by Jon Krause

There is a future with no drinkable water. There is a future in which the Amazon is populated with the skeletons of extinct animals and fossils of long-dead plants. There is a future in which humans will struggle to breathe.

It may sound like a distant future in a science fiction novel, but it is an imminent reality. Climate change impacts us in every facet of our lives. Everything we do, everything we eat, how we commute, how much we buy and how we discard it, has an impact on our planet.

Reversing climate change is about changing societal behaviors. As a behavioral scientist, I believe that my field of research—which is focused on understanding human behaviors and decision making—can help positively impact the globe.

To that extent, the Fox School of Business is proud to launch the Sustainability and Social Impact Strategic Initiative. This initiative, which is focused on researching, understanding and designing ways to nudge consumers into adopting sustainable consumption behaviors, is one way we’re moving the needle on climate change.

Focus on Long-Term Benefits

Resistance toward adopting sustainable behaviors often comes from our tendency to focus on short-term benefits, while devaluing long-term, more significant rewards. By understanding how and when consumers focus on future benefits, we can nudge them to change their behaviors around sustainable consumption.

For example, my research has found that when people are reminded of how busy they are, they tend to feel that they are valuable. This leads people to make decisions that are better from a long-term perspective–for example, being more likely to save money for the future than spending money on indulgences today.

Attaching Emotions

Another reason why people don’t adopt sustainable behaviors is that many feel a decreased sense of emotional attachment with nature and have begun to treat it as a separate entity. Building a more emotional relationship with nature might motivate people to place a greater focus on sustainable behaviors.

In my research, I am working on simple interventions that encourage the public to build positive memories with nature, such as inviting them to take pictures of their favorite outdoor spots in their neighborhood. This simple activity can make people feel more connected to nature, thus motivating them to adopt behaviors that are good for the environment in general.

Behavioral Science for Policy Change

Behavioral science does not only help design compelling interventions aimed at encouraging sustainable consumption. It can also help increase the effectiveness of government programs.

Take sustainable advertising, for example. Through my research, I found that people can imagine a danger more vividly when the message communicates a single risk as opposed to multiple risks. This insight can help policymakers, who spend a significant amount of money on sustainable advertising. Ensuring that these messages only communicate a single risk can result in an increased likelihood that readers will adopt the desired behaviors.

At the Fox School, we understand our responsibility as global citizens to create a positive impact on the world. The Sustainability and Social Impact Initiative is committed to acting on that sense of responsibility by focusing on research aimed at encouraging sustainable consumption and working with communities to implement these behavioral interventions.

Cleaner Actions for a Cleaner World: 8 Simple Ways to Live Greener At Home

  1. Switch one (or more!) appliance to an energy efficient model  
  2. Visit your local farmers market for groceries and produce
  3. Cancel your paper statements
  4. Unplug chargers and appliances when not in use
  5. Repurpose glass jars as leftover containers
  6. Reuse scrap paper
  7. When driving, combine all your errands for the week in one trip
  8. Donate your old clothes and furniture to thrift stores instead of throwing them away

This story was originally published in Fox Focus, the Fox School’s alumni magazine.

Stay up-to-date on Fox School research at fox.temple.edu/idea-marketplace.

Ethical Technology illustrationIn the technology industry, the unending pursuit of the next big innovation leaves little room for ethical considerations about data privacy and evolves too quickly for any governing body to create and enforce regulations. For years, technologists have held firm in the belief that they do not need government intervention to regulate their actions, but in light of recent revelations that belief is starting to waver.

The complicated relationship between ethics, regulations and technology came to a head in 2018 thanks to Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal. When the social network exposed the data of 87 million users to the Trump Campaign’s political consulting firm, consumers began to question whether or not they really had control over their personal information. In a survey conducted that year by Pew Research Center, roughly half of U.S. adults revealed that they do not trust the federal government or social media sites to protect their data. Now more than ever, the pressure is on policymakers to close the gap and regulate the industry. However, the question remains: can you enforce ethical behavior in tech?

Creating an Environment that Supports Ethical Behavior

Let’s start by looking at the workplace. For ethical decision-making to become a part of a company’s practice, there needs to be a cultural and organizational infrastructure in place to support it. Many believe that a c-suite position for ethics and integrity should exist within every organization, and a handful of companies already have that role in place. Leora Eisenstadt, assistant professor in the Department of Legal Studies at the Fox School, believes that it’s a step in the right direction, but for the position to be successful, it needs support from managers and employees at all levels.

“It’s not going to filter up to the chief integrity officer unless the people on the ground are asking the right questions,” says Eisenstadt. Encouraging employees to speak up and challenge their superiors when they sense an issue is crucial to implementing this type of change. “If that is not encouraged, you’re never going to hear it,” Eisenstadt says.

In addition to internal checks and balances, there also needs to be external regulations to hold companies accountable. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is currently preparing for what could be the most substantial penalty in its history for Facebook, but it’s hardly enough to have a significant impact on the company’s bottom line.

If the U.S.had a comprehensive policy akin to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Facebook would be liable for up to 4 percent of its annual global revenue, or $2.2 billion. According to Anthony Vance, director of the Center for Cyber Security at the Fox School, a penalty of that magnitude is the only thing that will get major corporations to pay attention, as it could have an actual effect on the company’s performance. “Right now, there is no law or major penalty,” Vance says. “So companies treat data as a resource to them; as their own asset that they can mine and resell, which is a huge privacy violation.”

The Role That Policy Can Play

There is hope yet, however, in the California Consumer Privacy Act, which was signed into law in 2018 and will go into effect in 2020. Inspired by GDPR, it will set the bar for online privacy in the U.S. “Now, there’s huge legislative pressure to enact some kind of federal regulation to basically enshrine ethical principles about privacy and law,” says Vance. “For the first time in history, tech companies are pushing the federal government to create a uniform policy.”  

Even with internal and external regulations in place, it’s also vital for us as consumers to play our part and pay attention. There will always be more powerful technological developments on the horizon and new dilemmas to face in the future. It’s not realistic to expect consumers to read through every line of every “Terms of Use” policy they see, but it’s important to be aware of the way a company operates. We have the power to vote leaders into political office that understand the industry and can fight to enact laws on our behalf. “That responsibility doesn’t just rest on technologists,” Vance says, “it rests on us as people.”

How to Be a Responsible Tech Consumer:

  • Install an Adblock extension in your browser if you want to prevent your data from being collected and tracked
  • Be aware that if you’re using a free service, you’re the product of that service, and limit the data you share
  • Find and support political leaders who are tech-savvy and share the same beliefs as you do about privacy and ethics laws  
  • Stay informed on recent events in the tech industry, especially for companies that provide a service you are actively using

This story was originally published in Fox Focus, the Fox School’s alumni magazine.

Navigation app on smartphone

As consumers, we have said goodbye to hailing taxi cabs in the pouring rain. We have stopped stressing about public transit schedules and delays. Some of us have even found alternative solutions to a costly ambulance ride.

Instead, we just get an Uber.

Ride-sharing platforms like Uber and Lyft are one of the biggest ways people participate in what is known as the “sharing economy,” through which individuals share goods, like homes and condos on Airbnb and VRBO, or services, like labor and freelance work on TaskRabbit and Upwork.

For many, participating in the sharing economy as a consumer is freeing. But how have the suppliers—those who own cars or homes—been affected in the last decade?

Jing Gong, assistant professor of Management Information Systems at the Fox School, sought out the answer.

Consumer or consumed?

Using Uber as an example, Gong could see two sides of the same coin. On one hand, the demand side, consumers who use Uber might be more willing to give up their cars in favor of the convenience of temporary ownership, what she called the “cannibalization effect.”

On the supply side, however, Gong could also see that providers may have an incentive as well. Drivers—or those desiring to be drivers—may actually invest in their cars in order to capitalize on the income available in the sharing economy.

To discover the answer, Gong and her co-authors—Brad Greenwood, associate professor of Information and Decision Sciences at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, and Yiping Song, associate professor of Marketing at Fudan University’s School of Management—investigated Uber’s entry into different cities in China. Using a unique dataset of new personal vehicle registrations between 2010 and 2015, Gong and her colleagues analyzed new car purchases compared to Uber’s introduction to the country starting in 2013.

Because Uber came to different Chinese cities at different times, the research team was able to use a statistical technique called difference in differences, which mimics a lab experiment, to compare groups classified as controlled or treated. As the platform rolled out, the team used variables in both geography and time to understand Uber’s effects compared to the control cities.

In the paper, “Uber Might Buy Me a Mercedes Benz: An Empirical Investigation of the Sharing Economy and Durable Goods Purchase,” the researchers found that both riders and drivers have become consumers.

“The consumption of Uber needs to be satisfied by more cars being available,” says Gong. “As more people are giving up on public transportation or car ownership, others are seeing the opportunity of becoming a driver, which in return calls for an increase in car sales and trade-ins.”

Entrepreneurs without red tape

The sharing economy has made way for entrepreneurs, sans the red tape.

Gong’s study found that Uber’s arrival to a city was correlated with an increase in new vehicle ownership—about eight percent on average. The researchers estimated that roughly 16 percent of new owners were purchasing their cars in order to become Uber drivers.

The effects were varied when the researchers analyzed key conditions. First, Uber had a stronger effect on the sale of smaller cars than larger cars, with owners placing a high premium on features like fuel efficiency. Second, women were less affected by Uber’s entry into a marketplace, but still experienced a significant increase in car ownership. Finally, young people were more significantly affected, given their higher likelihood to drive for ride-sharing platforms, change jobs, and have more volatile income.

Now, having a car or a home has allowed owners to see an opportunity for financial gain. For those who are unemployed or underemployed, ride-sharing has given them the tools and flexibility of a consistent income.

Effects from Detroit to D.C.

In this study, the researchers disprove a popular myth that Uber’s arrival has people fleeing car ownership. Knowing that buyers are now looking to purchase goods specifically for participating in the sharing economy, how should manufacturers react?

“In order for drivers to stay current while being cost-efficient, they are paying attention to the type of cars they are buying,” says Gong. “Whether it is for style or fuel economy, manufacturers are willing to market specific vehicles in order to draw in drivers.”

With Uber and other platforms, workers are bypassing the formalities of employment regulations. While lawmakers have highly regulated incumbents in the industries, like taxi companies and professional car services, startups have not had to contend with such high obstacles.

“Policymakers are having to reconsider whether this business model can sustain itself without intervention,” says Gong. She suggests lawmakers be thoughtful about reducing regulations on these established industry players to provide a level playing field.

A New Frontier

It is evident that platforms like Uber have changed the economic game faster than industries can keep up.

“The sharing economy is changing the landscape because it’s consumer to consumer,” says Gong. “The dynamics are different because the drivers are consumers of cars but the riders are also consumers of cars. With the manufacturers in the mix, there are more players.”

This research, the first of its kind to analyze the impact of the ridesharing economy on car owners, can provide insights to industries across the sharing economy. The introduction of Airbnb, for example, could encourage more homeownership for those looking to make money in new hot rental markets. Manufacturers of these goods will need to understand, build for, and market to these new customers.

Powered by new technologies and an entrepreneurial spirit, the sharing economy will continue to grow in both importance and prevalence. Yet, the question remains:

Is a new car—and gig—in your future?

This story was originally published in On the Verge, the Fox School’s flagship research magazine. For more stories, visit www.fox.temple.edu/ontheverge.

mosquito in high definitionVictor H. Gutierrez-Velez never expected his work to lead him to the topic of public health. His expertise lies in remote sensing science, analyzing data such as satellite images. “Every day, numerous satellite images are taken,” says Gutierrez-Velez. And the information drawn from these images has both academic and commercial applications.

For example, satellite images can help prescribe management, fertilization, irrigation, and other activities in precision agriculture, according to Gutierrez-Velez. They can help the insurance industry assess risks related to flooding or other natural disasters, or to verify crop insurance complains. Satellite imagery can allow energy companies to pinpoint the ideal location for solar panels. And this kind of data, it turns out, can even come in handy when it comes to fighting certain diseases.

To that end, partnering with colleagues with expertise in biology and public health, Gutierrez-Velez, assistant professor in the College of Liberal Arts, has recently been drawn to an unlikely research subject: mosquitoes. Specifically, the tiger mosquito (scientific name: aedes albopictus). What’s so interesting about this tiny, blood-sucking bug?

“It’s worrisome. They can spread the Zika virus and other dangerous diseases,” says Gutierrez-Velez.

In 2016 when the Zika pandemic caught his interest, mosquitoes dominated the headlines. Once thought to be limited to tropical and subtropical regions, the tiger mosquito had expanded its territory into most continents. Climate change plays a role, but these mosquitoes are also particularly aggressive. They’re among the 100 most invasive species in the world. In the 1980s, they were first spotted in the U.S. in Texas. Today, they reach as far north as Connecticut. Their presence in Pennsylvania remains an ongoing public health concern.  

For his project, a recipient of the Office for the Vice President of Research‘s Targeted Grant Program and supported by the Data Science Institute housed at the Fox School, Gutierrez-Velez decided to look at multiple datasets, including climate data, information gathered from sampling for the presence of the tiger mosquito, land cover data, and census information. Gutierrez-Velez believes that with these and other datasets as inputs, machine learning and advanced algorithms can be used to predict the locations of tiger mosquito populations in advance of the season.

One of the most interesting possible findings of this research is that the tiger mosquito is less of a rural dweller than previously thought. “What we’re finding contradicts conventional wisdom about where these mosquitoes live. They are becoming domesticated animals. They prefer to be where lots of humans are living closely together—in cities. Because they love our blood,” says Gutierrez-Velez.

Scientific curiosity led Gutierrez-Velez to census data, which is not necessarily an obvious source of information to predict the presence or absence of a small flying bug. “If they feed on humans, human behavior should have something to do with it,” he says. And it does seem like including this data makes for a more accurate prediction about where the mosquitoes will go next.

Gutierrez-Velez’s ultimate goal for the project is to perfect a reliable working model that can be used to predict the upcoming mosquito season. Knowing that a particularly bad mosquito season is about to start will give officials the opportunity to plan in advance.

For example, the most affected areas can be targeted for treatment before the problem becomes unmanageable. Residents could be strongly cautioned in advance of the season to deal with housing-related conditions, such as places that collect standing water, which act as mosquito breeding areas. In the event that mosquitoes are spreading Zika or another virus, these protections could even save lives.

“There’s a lot we can do if we have a model that can say, ‘Hey, it’s going to be a bad year for mosquitoes, get ready,’” says Gutierrez-Velez.

This story was originally published in On the Verge, the Fox School’s flagship research magazine. For more stories, visit www.fox.temple.edu/ontheverge.

Ed Rosenthal, MSCM Chair

Another semester has just about ticked over since the last chair’s message from December. As May begins, there is a great deal of excitement in the air. Seniors are getting ready to graduate, faculty are getting final projects and exams graded (and getting ready for the summer!)—and it is an opportune time to pause and look back over the past academic year, as well as to look ahead at what’s in store for next year.

Foremost in my mind is the incredible achievement by our AMA Student Chapter, which just recently was selected as the number one overall student chapter (out of 390) at the 2019 AMA International Collegiate Conference in New Orleans. Our Chapter won seven awards altogether and was the talk of the conference. Congratulations to everyone in our fabulous AMA Chapter! Also, congratulations and many thanks to Dr. Craig Atwater, our AMA Faculty Advisor, as well as faculty co-advisors Drew Allmond and Jim Thompson.

As many of you are aware, 2019 is a pivotal year for the Fox School. Interim Dean Ronald Anderson has convened a Strategic Planning Task Force to set our priorities and chart our direction for the future of the school. Concordant with that, Dean Anderson has asked me to conduct a similar exercise for our Marketing and Supply Chain Management Department. This effort comes on the heels of an external review that was conducted by faculty and deans from Rutgers, the University of Delaware and the University of Washington. We look forward to receiving the report from the review team and to begin to implement some of their suggestions to strengthen our programs and our impact.

This spring we are in the process of completing a successful hiring campaign: We expect to welcome two new faculty members for Fall 2019, one in operations and supply chain management and one in quantitative marketing. These faculty members will provide a serious boost to those two important areas.

Finally, every year we have arrivals, departures and congratulatory news as well. This month we will host a goodbye reception for former department chair and long-time professor Dr. Michael Smith. We will miss you Mike! We are also sorry to say goodbye to Dr. Angelika Dimoka, who will be joining the University of Houston this summer. On a different note, I would like to congratulate Professor Katie Gerst on her appointment to be the Fox School’s next director of our Honors Program.

I’d like to wish everyone a great summer in whatever you do: Relaxing, traveling, getting sand in your shoes or even getting in some teaching, learning or research. Whatever you get done, let’s look forward to hitting the Fall with some recharged batteries!

 

Students at Women In Beer event
Students attending Women in Beer with Molly Hayes.

Sheri Lambert, assistant professor of practice and the MS Marketing in Marketing Research and Insights program director, launched a new speaker series inviting undergraduate and graduate marketing majors to get up close and personal with industry experts.  

Before joining MSCM full-time, Lambert taught as an adjunct in the MIS/MSCM joint MS in Digital Innovation in Marketing program, contributing to the MIS guest lecture webinar series which reaches undergraduate, graduate and alumni students of Marketing and Management Information Systems programs. The MIS and MCSM Departments’ lecture series has earned a nomination for this year’s FOX Impact Award.

Lambert says, “The Industry Guest Lecture Series helps BBA, MBA and MS students prepare to excel in the marketplace and succeed in whichever career path they may choose. Series positively impacts students’ learning and preparedness for entry into the business world.”

Students listened to engaging presentations from professionals in different industries with the following MSCM offerings:  

  • Nima Gohil, Digital & Creative Research Consumer Evaluation on “Customer centricity & Connected Research” for L’Oreal NA
  • Michele Salomon, VP, Consumer Insights on “See What Matters: How Video is Transforming Research” for Big Sofa Technologies
  • Molly Hayes-Global, Director of Brand Insights on “The Other Half: Reconnecting Women & Beer” for Anheuser-Busch InBev
  • Anthony Pizzuto, Sr. Director, Days Inn Brand on “Hitting Reset: Making a 50-year old Brand Relevant Again” for Wyndham Hotels & Resorts
  • Eleni McCready, Sr. Dir, Media & Promotions on “Authentic Storytelling” for Lilly Pulitzer
  • Lori Bush, Entrepreneur and Retired CEO on “Let’s Get Phygital” for Rodan + Fields

Students see the value from the industry series and actively engage with the professionals at these events.

“As a student at the Fox School of Business, I have directly reaped the benefits of the Industry Guest Lecture Series with my peers. The professionals who have visited Temple University thus far have shared their stories behind cracking the code to some of modern marketing’s biggest challenges. Hearing these speakers helps individuals like myself make connections with business leaders. Another benefit of the speaker series is that it helps students draw parallels to what we are learning in the classroom and brings that content to life. It draws parallels that help bring classroom content to life. The hard work behind the scenes that goes into making this happen creates invaluable opportunities for the Fox community and opens doors to learn, gather advice and advance our careers,” says James Base, BBA ’19, president of the Temple University American Marketing Association.

“Sheri Lambert has completely exceeded and surpassed any expectation I could’ve ever imagined having at Temple University in the Marketing Department. She has brought real life into the classroom and expanded my knowledge by bringing Guest Lecturers to our campus,” says Isabel Paynter, senior, Marketing major.

When we bring experts onto campus, we continuously initiate impactful dialogue with industry professionals, who promote, stimulate and encourage additional conversations relevant to our classroom lessons. Each guest has offered a different perspective for students. They make learning about important issues more meaningful to students, and these discussions sparked excitement, as well as participation,” says Lambert.

MSCM thanks the presenters for their engaging programming and plans to open sessions to marketing alumni in the area, starting this fall. Please contact Nicole Stilianos at nstili@temple.edu to receive invitations.

TU_AMA Group
Faculty Advisors Craig Atwater, PhD, Andrew Allmond and Jim Thompson celebrate with 30 members of TU-AMA after the announcement.

Temple University American Marketing Association (TU-AMA) was named AMA International Collegiate Chapter of the Year in front of 1,700 marketers on April 13, 2019 at the 2019 AMA International Collegiate Conference in New Orleans, LA. Only two out of 390 collegiate chapters across the globe are awarded this honor each year in recognition of excellence in performance. TU-AMA will be inducted into the “Platinum Circle” for the following two academic years.

This is the first time that the TU-AMA received this award. In addition, Mary Conran, associate professor of practice, Temple University of Rome’s chief academic officer and President of the Marketing SPO in 1979, was named the Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient for her dedication to students and her engagement with AMA.

James Base TU AMA
TU-AMA President James Base holding the International Chapter of the Year award.

TU-AMA President James Base says, “Having served as President for the 2018-19 year, the honor to receive this award is a testament to the hard work of our Executive Board and the dedication of our general body members. This wouldn’t have been possible without the unwavering support we receive from the Fox School of Business community of faculty, department workers, students and alumni.”

From April 11th-13th, the TTU-AMA participated in the 41st Annual International Collegiate Conference held in New Orleans, LA. This year, more than ever, “Temple University” was called for several additional accomplishments, including:

  • 1st Place in the Website Competition
  • 1st Place in the “Best Social Impact Video” Competition
  • 3rd Place in the Wall Street Journal Case Competition
  • 3rd Place for the Conference Tee Shirt Design Contest
  • John Parkinson, as a Perfect Pitch Competition Finalist
  • Alison Wehr & Frank Romean, as Marketing Strategy Competition Finalists
  • Tabby Miller, as a Student Research Poster Competition 2nd Place Winner

Department Chairman Dr. Ed Rosenthal says of TU-AMA’s achievements, “Every year we have a great group of kids—enthusiastic, dedicated and skilled—who grow into leadership roles and expend a great deal of time and energy in our Chapter. The activities they plan always enrich and add value to their development as marketers. It is always humbling to me to see the extent of their work ethic and devotion. It is always special to see, and it is not surprising, year after year, that our AMA chapter is always one of the top ones. But this year, [they] went and won the Championship!”

The Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management is proud of our TU-AMA students!

Kuang-Yao Lee, assistant professor of statistical science at the Fox School

More than 15 million adults struggle with alcohol addiction. In fact, according to the CDC, one in ten deaths of working-age adults in America is linked to alcohol. That’s one reason data on alcohol use has been chosen by researchers for study from the enormous data set from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ ambitious Million Veteran Program (MVP). The VA intends as the project’s name states, to gather data on an astonishing one million service members.

Kuang-Yao Lee, assistant professor of statistical science at the Fox School, sees a world of potential new knowledge in this vast cache of data. This is particularly true of alcohol use because the data from the MVP is longitudinal, which means the same measurements are tracked over time. Alongside the support from the VA, Lee’s project received funding through from Office for the Vice President of Research at Temple University.

Volunteers in the MVP each submit blood samples as well as health surveys, amassing a dataset that comprises both genetic data and behavioral patterns. Beginning in 2016 when he was a researcher at Yale University, Lee and his colleagues have been using this information-rich resource to search for the specific combination of genes that correspond to alcohol and other substance use.

“Previous studies have suggested [these genes exist], but mostly were only limited to small scales or restricted conditions,” says Lee. “We want to use statistical models to find out if this is really a valid assumption. Our results so far suggest a very strong association.”

While ample electronic health records and genetic data have long been available to researchers, only recently has the efficient computing power become available to slice and dice the information into accurate, usable new insights and discoveries. More sophisticated algorithms combined with larger-than-ever computer storage capacity, as well as parallel computation techniques, allow today’s researchers to make meaning from a huge amount of complex data.

How huge? “Depending on the facility, the whole genome sequencing [for one person] can produce hundreds of millions of variants,” says Lee. Questionnaires allow researchers to gather large amounts of information about each subject every time they are administered. Multiply that by one million veterans. “We’re talking about not just billions, but millions of millions of points of data,” he says.

Data with this level of complexity can lead to findings that are more nuanced and reliable than in the past. Previously statistics sometimes led to oversimplified and other not-quite-right conclusions. We’ve all heard the old axiom, “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” But as so-called big data increases in scope and complexity and the tools used to analyze this data become more sophisticated, statistics are becoming more honest than ever before. From projects such as the Million Veteran Program and other similarly vast datasets, new genetic truths may ultimately emerge.

There are many possible real-world applications for this research. For one thing, determining which specific genes are linked with alcohol and other substance abuse could lead to new and better medicines and treatments for the very veterans who have volunteered their most sensitive personal information for this work. A dialed-in genetic profile that indicates a vulnerability for substance abuse could be used to screen kids and even adults while there is still time for effective early interventions that can keep them on a healthy path. Given the current public health crisis around opioids, alcohol, and other substance use, a breakthrough of this kind could have far-reaching benefits.

Lee says that the knowledge gleaned from the Million Veteran Program about substance abuse may lead to similar projects that could help solve other vexing behavioral, health, and genetic puzzles. He also notes that the innovative statistical models and tools he’s used in this research could be applied in myriad ways to other complex datasets.

For example, online shopping platforms can easily observe huge amounts of individual consumers and, at the same time, collect data across large numbers of variables. “One of the core problems in business analytics is to use statistical models to study the inter-dependency between observed variables, for example, the dependency between decision making and consumer behavior,” Lee says.

“There are a surprising number of similarities between genomics and online shopping.”

This story was originally published in On the Verge, the Fox School’s flagship research magazine. For more stories, visit www.fox.temple.edu/ontheverge.

fox-school-centennial

To honor those who have fueled our first 100 years, Temple University’s Fox School of Business has announced an A-Z list of honorees—entrepreneurs, visionaries, and disruptors—who helped shape the school and the business world since 1918.

The list includes some of the best minds to graduate from or become friends of the Fox School over the last century, such as a feared litigator; a female Air Force Reserve lieutenant colonel in World II; a Grammy award-winning producer, writer and musician; and a business executive for Nike. It also includes the inspirational stories of immigrants; candidates for political office; benefactors of education, healthcare and the arts; and many more.

“The Centennial Honorees succeeded over the past century because they were persistent and because they were innovators at heart,” said Ronald Anderson, interim dean, Fox School of Business. “Many of their stories contain consistent themes—including originality, service, and generosity. All of these people have impacted the Fox School in uniquely profound ways—through their involvement, commitment, and a strong belief in innovation.”

Meet the Centennial Honorees, get to know their inspirational stories and read their words of wisdom.

fox.temple.edu/centennial/honorees

From left to right: Jerry Miller, Pamela Rainey Lawler, Ellen Weber, Wesley Davis, Olaitan Awomolo, Francisco Garcia, and Luke Butler. Credit: Chris Kendig Photography

A professor from the Tyler School of Art and a Beasley Law School student won the $40,000 grand prize—as well as $20,000 for finishing in first place in their category—at Temple University’s Be Your Own Boss Bowl® (BYOBB®), which is housed in the Fox School of Business.

Olaitan Awomolo, who teaches architecture and design at Tyler, and her partner, Wesley Davis, a law school student and former community projects coordinator from Pittsburgh, developed BuildLAB as a collaboration and project management tool intended to bring together owners, architects, engineers and foremen. BuildLAB is an online platform for designing, task assigning and managing and a real-time cost and build-time dashboard.

According to Awomolo and Davis, projects run millions of dollars over projected costs because of changes and the miscommunication of those changes between design and construction.

“I wrote a dissertation on the topic (of architectural-engineering-construction collaboration) and I worked as an architect,” Awomolo says.

Davis said the pair plan to use the $60,000 in cash and services to help finish a pilot model of their software so they can take the next step toward putting it on the market.

“I was delighted to see the broad range of participants in today’s event. Lots of us sit home and think ‘I could do this’ and that’s how far that it goes,” says Temple University Provost Joanne Epps. “And what IEI does is help make those dreams a reality.”

The competition featured three tracks, with a first-place finisher in each earning a prize worth $20,000 in cash prizes:

  • Social Impact Track Winner: Pay It Forward Live. Shari Smith-Jackson
    BYOBB judges with Social Impact Track winner Shari Smith-Jackson. Credit: Chris Kendig Photography

    created the social media app for tracking volunteer hours for her teenage son and is hoping that game-ifying her app will spark more volunteerism and keep volunteers active.

  • Undergraduate Track Winner: Mouse Motel. Essentially: a better mousetrap. Engineering student and graduating senior Paul Gehret made simple modifications to the common glue trap that he said has three times the effectiveness of its predecessor.
  • Upper Track Winner: BuildLAB.

The audience at the live pitch event at Alter Hall on Temple’s main campus were able to vote for their favorite entry. MailRoom, an app designed by Fox School and Clemson University students, won the crowd favorite award. The app matches users with local businesses, such as coffee shops and bookstores, which contract to safely receive packages through delivery services.

The BYOBB® gave away more than $200,000 in prizes and services to help the participants get their businesses up and running.

Keynote speaker Adam Lyons, BBA ’09, received the Self Made and Making Others Award. Lyons started building The Zebra out of a friend’s basement before moving to an incubator and obtaining funding from billionaire investor Mark Cuban. The Zebra is an online insurance marketplace that reports millions in income each year.

Keynote speaker Adam Lyons and Senior Vice Dean Debbie Campbell. Credit: Chris Kendig Photography

Lyons is now engaged in several efforts to support entrepreneurship including Innovation Works, a seeding program that has invested in more than 200 startups, and The Lyons Foundation, which attempts to inspire entrepreneurship in children.

During his keynote address, Lyons spoke about using the naysayers as inspiration. He also said he ran into several chicken-and-egg type problems with The Zebra—companies wanted users signed up, but users were not going to sign up until there were companies involved. Lyons said he just kept scratching at both sides of the problem until it was solved.

He also said there is no skeleton key for the problems entrepreneurs face. Each case, each problem, each startup is different.

“I have started to think that entrepreneurship resembles art more than a science,” Lyons says. “I don’t think entrepreneurship is for everybody, but it is something you can be creative with. If you are passionate about a problem, you can be your own boss. You can make your own destiny.”

Learn more about the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Institute.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Business consultants are problem solvers and, oftentimes, fortune tellers. With the rise of technology in industries such as cybersecurity, healthcare and information technology, consultants have become even more popular because they can help organizations address current and future challenges based on insights, market analysis, resource optimization and more.

The Temple University Management Consulting Program (TUMCP)’s Temple Consulting Club recently partnered with the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Institute (IEI)’s Women’s Entrepreneurial Association to host a panel discussion with the theme of “Women in Consulting.” The four panelists, Daniella Colleta, Gail Blauer, Jessica Podgajny and Katie Stellard have a wealth of knowledge and experience in the field. We caught up with them to ask what they wish they had known in their 20s, and for any advice they have for women in the consulting field.

Never Shy Away From a Challenge

As an advisory manager at Grant Thornton LLP, Daniella Colleta deploys company-wide change management programs to expose employees to new ways of working. Additionally, she leads with a people-first strategy in order to reinforce new behaviors and achieve collaboration across people, processes and technologies.

“It is never too early to begin building a network of peers, advocates and mentors,” Colleta says. “Don’t shy away from those who challenge you. This will pay off dividends and the power of relationships should never be underestimated. Plus, there’s always much to learn and doing it with and around those you enjoy is the real reward.”

Nurture and Grow Natural Strengths

With twelve years of experience, Blauer specializes in business process improvement, business strategy, business transformation and business process outsourcing (BPO). Currently, she serves as the managing director of Deloitte Consulting.

“Be your authentic self. Often we are told that we have a characteristic that other people don’t find appealing, but that is who we are,” she explains. “I have always been assertive and aggressive, and I go after what I want. When I went to graduate school around the age of 22, I tried to suppress my natural assertiveness. As I have grown in my career, I realized it was something to nurture and grow. I advice young women to embrace the natural strengths that other people think are weaknesses.”

Move Feelings of Intimidation to the Backseat

In early 2017, Podgajny founded Blink Consulting, a firm that helps companies with culture, strategic planning, organizational change and design. She is a seasoned leader, passionate about partnering with both established and emerging organizations to catalyze growth. She has a track record of high-energy, high-touch and high-ROI result that have created long-lasting corporate legacies.

“When looking back on what I wish I’d known early in my career, two things come to mind. The first is to bring your whole self to work,” Podgajny says. “Initially, I kept my personal life and work life very separate until I realized that sharing more about myself as a whole person created room for building strong, meaningful working relationships with colleagues and clients. The second is to remember that ‘the boss’ or senior ranking leaders in the company are really just people. They likely don’t have all the answers and have their own strengths and weaknesses. The advice: Move your feelings of intimidation out of the way and have authentic dialogues with all colleagues regardless of their level. It will go a long way!”

Build a Network of Advocates and Colleagues

As a senior manager at Navigate Corporation, Stellard primarily focuses on project management office (PMO); and project and program management. With twenty years of experience in management consulting, she specializes in many sectors of the industry including, pharmaceutical, manufacturing, higher education and real estate.

“My advice to a just-starting-out consultant would be to build a network of peers and mentors that are working in your areas of interest and learn from their experience. They may also serve as your greatest advocates and center you as you navigate your career, even through job changes and challenges along the way.”

If you are interested in pursuing a career in consulting or entrepreneurship, learn more about the Fox Strategic Management department.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Grants Create Scholarships for Risk Management and Insurance Majors and Maguire College School Scholars at Temple University

PHILADELPHIA, April 8, 2019 – A $2.75 million commitment from the Maguire Foundation will help undergraduate students at Temple University in need of financial aid pursue undergraduate degrees, excel in their courses and graduate with less debt. This will provide permanent financial support to Temple Students who are Maguire Scholars.

The commitment includes $1.5 million to go to undergraduate students at Temple University’s Fox School of Business who are pursuing majors in Risk Management and Insurance in the form of the Maguire Business Scholars Program. Another $1.25 million is set aside for the Maguire College Scholars program, which benefits Temple University students coming from one of the Maguire High School partners.

“The Foundation is committed to ensuring that gifted college students in need of financial aid are positioned to succeed at Temple through the Maguire Scholars Program, and at the Fox School of Business through the Maguire Business Scholars Program,” says Megan Maguire Nicoletti, Maguire Foundation President and CEO. “The establishment of the Maguire Endowed Scholars Programs will allow students now and for years to come to discover their full potential for service and achievement and potentially pursue a career in an industry that has been so fulfilling to my father and my family.”

The Maguire College Scholars program will benefit academically strong students with high financial need for all four years of college. The foundation is involved in funding education and scholarships from Pre-K through higher education.

“This significant financial support from the Maguire Foundation has a tremendous impact on our students, allowing them to focus on their studies as they prepare for lucrative careers,” says Richard M. Englert, president of Temple University. “The Maguire Foundation has a long history as a leader in improving opportunities for deserving individuals. At Temple, we are grateful to have such a strong relationship with the Maguire Foundation and thankful for this investment in our Fox School students.”

The business school scholarships will benefit at least five Risk Management and Insurance students as they focus on the core classes in their major.

“Scholarships do more than make education affordable for at-need students,” says Interim Dean Ronald Anderson, of the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management. “The Maguire Scholars and Maguire Business Scholars programs put students in a position to pursue their career with less debt when they graduate. Scholarships like the Maguire Foundation offerings put students in a position to succeed, not only in school, but also when they enter the job market.”

Sam Belkowitz, BBA ’19, said the Maguire Scholars program enabled him to excel at the Fox School.

“It allowed me to really focus on my studies,” Belkowitz says. “I have been able to really succeed in my coursework at Temple. I have a 3.95 GPA and a big part of that is I did not have to worry about making money while going to school.”

Belkowitz has benefitted from the scholarship since the spring semester of his junior year at Temple, when he pursued his major in Risk Management and Insurance. He said after graduation he will hit the job market with less debt, enabling him to aim for a job he really wants.

“One big thing is just the opportunity to really pursue what I want to do and not have to worry about paying off my loans so much,” Belkowitz says.

Sandra Michel, BS ’19, said she would not have been able to pursue her degree without the Maguire scholarship. Michel, who graduated from Archbishop Prendergast in 2015, has benefitted from the scholarship all four years at Temple University.

She will graduate with a degree in recreational therapy from Temple University’s College of Public Health and hopes to pursue a master’s degree while working with people who have mental health challenges.

“The scholarship is a good impetus to stay involved in social work and active in the community,” Michel says. “And it takes a huge financial burden off me and my family.”

The foundation is making the contributions to both programs over a five-year period in order to establish a permanent endowment at Temple University. The money is being added to a series of contributions the Maguire Foundation has made to the school since 2013, when the Maguire Scholars program began at Temple University with a commitment to students studying risk management and insurance.

About the Maguire Foundation
The Maguire Foundation is a nonprofit organization that invests in education, the arts and humanities and fighting hunger and homelessness. The foundation funds scholarships as 31 different universities and colleges.

The foundation was established on Oct. 2, 2000 by James and Frances Maguire. James Maguire is the founder and chairman emeritus of Philadelphia Consolidated Holding Corporation, which includes the subsidiaries Maguire Insurance Agency, Tokio Marine Specialty Insurance Company and Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company. He is a Korean War veteran and graduate of Saint Joseph’s University.

About the Fox School of Business
Temple University’s Fox School of Business is the largest, most comprehensive business school in the Philadelphia region and among the largest in the world, with more than 9,000 students, 220 full-time faculty and 60,000 alumni around the globe. The Fox School has a proud tradition of delivering innovative, entrepreneurial programs for the past 100 years. With facilities that provide access to market- leading technologies, the school fosters a collaborative and creative learning environment. Coupled with its leading student services, the Fox School ensures that its graduates are fully prepared to enter the real-world job market. Learn more at fox.temple.edu. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn.

###