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Fox Marketing students Alexander Brannan, Lily Tran, Abbey Harris, and Rachel Baker hold their first-place plaque after winning the American Marketing Association’s Collegiate Case Competition.
Fox Marketing students Alexander Brannan, Lily Tran, Abbey Harris, and Rachel Baker hold their first-place plaque after winning the American Marketing Association’s Collegiate Case Competition.

Marketing majors from Temple University’s student chapter of the American Marketing Association (AMA) won the parent organization’s annual Collegiate Case Competition by delivering a marketing strategy for a product from event sponsor The Hershey Company.

The Temple AMA team took top honors ahead of the University of Pennsylvania, Texas State University, and Ferris State University, among other tough competitors. The team of marketing students from the Fox School of Business assembled a thorough, research-driven marketing plan for Hershey’s Ice Breakers Cool Blast Chews, emerging from a field of 91 college chapters to claim first place in the prestigious competition for the first time. The $3,000 top prize will be allotted toward defraying costs related to next year’s case competition, the team said.

The Temple AMA all-junior presentation team comprised Lily Tran, Abbey Harris, Rachel Baker, and Alexander Bran- nan. The written case team included seniors Taylor Sauder, Rachel Zydyk, and Jennifer McGill. Temple AMA was one of 10 national finalists invited to deliver a presentation at the AMA International Collegiate Conference, held March 17-20 in New Orleans.

The final presentation culminated more than seven months of original research, situation analysis, conducting focus groups and surveys, and marketing recommendations by the Temple AMA team. The group had submitted its writ- ten case to AMA in December and, one month later, learned that it had been selected as one of the 10 finalists. From there, they delivered a number of “dry-run presentations,” said Dr. Craig Atwater, Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, and one of Temple AMA’s three faculty advisors.

“The focus groups and taste tests helped our students determine that the product’s positioning was ambiguous,” Atwater said. “It’s not a gum, as it dissolves within 15 seconds, and yet it’s not a mint.

It’s instead classified within a subcategory, as a power-mint. Our students found that for millennials, who enjoy trying new things, this product is cool and fun, but they found that it also required an explanation.”

“While awaiting the results, I remember counting the spots and losing count because my heart started to pound,” said Harris. “TU-AMA is improving in reputation thanks to our incredible faculty advisors — Dr. Craig Atwater, Professor Jim Thompson, and Dr. Drew Allmond — our talented Fox School professors, and the support of the Marketing department.”

Fox School Dean Dr. M. Moshe Porat, left, and Temple University President Dr. Neil D. Theobald, right, meet with William A. Graham, the recipient of the 2015 Musser Award for Excellence in Leadership.
Fox School Dean Dr. M. Moshe Porat, left, and Temple University President Dr. Neil D. Theobald, right, meet with William A. Graham, the recipient of the 2015 Musser Award for Excellence in Leadership.

The Fox School honored William A. “Bill” Graham IV as the recipient of the Musser Award for Excellence in Leadership, the highest honor conferred by the School, during a Nov. 5 dinner and reception. Graham is the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of The Graham Company, a privately held and leading U.S. insurance and surety brokerage and consulting firm considered one of the largest in the nation based on revenue size.

The evening paid homage to Graham and one of his lifelong loves — pigs. Graham, whose office is decorated with pig paraphernalia, is said to hold the animal in high regard because of its intelligence.

Graham received a plush pig toy, along with Musser Award winner’s customary crystal owl statuette, from Dean M. Moshe Porat and Warren V. “Pete” Musser upon reaching the podium to deliver his acceptance remarks.

Uplighting at Mitten Hall’s Great Court sets the stage for the 2015 Musser Award reception.
Uplighting at Mitten Hall’s Great Court sets the stage for the 2015 Musser Award reception.

CNBC anchor Tyler Mathisen, the event’s master of ceremonies, playfully addressed attendees in Pig Latin to kick off the evening. On stage, a safety inspector appeared and gave Mathisen an ultimatum about ensuring the safety of a nearby handrail — a play on Graham’s line of work. “Yes, Mr. Inspector. We’ll get right on that — when pigs fly,” Mathisen said, as a toy pig soared across Mitten Hall’s Great Court. A live potbelly pig, named Valentino, also made his way onto the stage to the crowd’s delight.

Also recognized at the recep- tion were: Dr. MB Sarkar, H.F. Gerry Lenfest Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation (Excellence in Teaching); Dr. Anthony Di Benedetto, Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management (Excellence in Research); Dr. TL Hill, Associate Professor of Strategic Management (Excellence in Faculty Service); Dr. Rajan Chandran, Fox School Deputy Dean (Excellence in Administrative Service); Silas C. Adams, FOX ’15 (Excellence in Student Leadership); and James J. Dornan, FOX ’85 (Excellence in Alumni Achievement).

Temple University Board of Trustees chairman Patrick J. O’Connor, left, congratulates William A. Graham, CEO of The Graham Company, during the 2015 Musser Award reception.
Temple University Board of Trustees chairman Patrick J. O’Connor, left, congratulates William A. Graham, CEO of The Graham Company, during the 2015 Musser Award reception.

Said Kenneth Ewell, the President and Chief Operations Officer of The Graham Company: “Bill Graham is the kind of man everyone wants to work for because he leads by example. I don’t think the Fox School of Business could have chosen a better-suited recipient for the Musser Award.”

Maybe when pigs fly.

1970s

Fred Krieger, BS ’69, MBA ’76
Delivered the keynote address at the January commencement ceremony for the Fox School of Business and the School of Tourism and Hospitality Management.

1980s

Chris Fiorentino, BBA ’76, MBA ’83, PhD  ’88
Appointed interim president of West Chester University, in West Chester, Pa. He had served as the university’s vice president for external operations.

Mark S. Pollock, BBA ’83
Hired as chief financial officer of Clutch, a Philadelphia-based firm that uses transactional and behavioral data to give retails insight on customers.

James J. Dornan, BBA  ’85
Received the Musser Award for Excellence in Alumni Achievement, at the Fox School’s 19th annual Musser Awards for Excellence in Leadership reception in November.

Robert L. Nydick, PhD  ’85
Cited by Sports Illustrated for research into the greatest professional sports records of all-time, along with co-author Howard J. Weiss, a professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at the Fox School.

Carol King Barrow, MBA ’86
Named to the executive committee of the board of trustees for SAGE Eldercare, which provides information, support, and services to help individuals lead independent and active lives in a four- county region in New Jersey.

Philip P.  Jaurigue, MBA ’86
Introduced as a new member of the ownership team of the Philadelphia Soul, of the Arena Football League. Jaurigue is the president and founder of Sabre Systems Inc., of Warrington, Pa.

Mike Shannon, MBA ’87
Appointed chief executive officer of Houghton International, Inc., a global leader in metalworking fluids and services.

Kim Cross, BBA ’88
Promoted to managing director of Morgan Stanley Investment Management.

Michael S. Keim, BBA ’89
Promoted to president of Univest Bank and Trust Co., for which he also joined the board of directors.

Rahul  Merchant, ’89
Recognized as the 2015 Gallery of Success honoree of the Fox School of Business.

Eric H. Siegel, MBA ’89
Recipient of the Philadelphia Business Journal’s 2015 Corporate Counsel Award, which recognizes the top corporate attorneys in the Philadelphia region. Siegel is executive vice president and general counsel of Incyte Corporation.

1990s

Atish Banerjea, MS ’91
Appointed to the board of directors with Nelson Education Ltd., Canada’s largest educational publisher.

Sheila Hess, BBA ’91
Appointed Philadelphia City Representative by Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney.

Janesa Urbano, BBA ’92, MBA ’96, LAW ’96
Recipient of the Philadelphia Business Journal’s 2015 Corporate Counsel Award, which recognizes the top corporate attorneys in the Philadelphia region. Urbano is vice president and general counsel of Ernest Bock & Sons Inc.

Raymond K.Y. Yam, BBA ’92, MBA ’96, MS  ’98
Received the Broadcasting Board of Governors Gold Medal Award for his service with the Voice of America, an international public broadcasting service of the United States federal government.

Adam Zhu, MBA ’94
Named non-executive chair of Greater China for Bacardi and special advisor to the chief executive officer of Bacardi Limited, the world’s largest privately held spirits company.

Stephen T. Wills, MS  ’94
Appointed interim chief executive officer of Derma Sciences, a tissue regeneration company focused on advanced wound and burn care.

John Aloysius, PhD ’96
Appointed interim director of the Behavioral Business Research Lab at the University of Arkansas.

Seth Gillston, BBA ’96
Appointed as manager to a team of private equity practice underwriters within Chubb, the world’s largest publicly traded property and casualty insurance company. He also serves as Chubb’s executive vice president.

Brent Saunders, MBA ’96
Featured in Bloomberg’s Businessweek. Saunders serves as chief executive officer of Allergan Plc, the Dublin-based pharmaceutical company.

James  Schurr,  MBA  ’98
Added to the Athletic Wall of Fame at Conwell-Egan Catholic High School, in Fairless Hills, Pa., where he was a five-sport athlete.

Madan Annavarjula, PhD ’98
Appointed dean of the College of Business at Bryant College, in Smithfield, R.I.

Susan Kruml, PhD ’99
Hired as vice president of academic affairs at Midland University, in Fremont, Neb.

Louis Zecca, MBA ’99
Joined David Boland, Inc., a general contractor based in Titusville, Fla., as the company’s executive vice president, managing the firm’s extensive portfolio of projects and developing new relationships with government and commercial market clients.

Marcia Lyssy, BBA ’01, MBA ’07
Promoted to senior vice president of human resources for global logistics firm BDP International. She had served as global director of talent management.

2000s

Raza Bokhari, MBA ’01
Appointed non-executive director of Akers Biosciences, a medical device company focused on reducing the cost of healthcare through faster, easier diagnostics.

E. Albert Reece, MBA ’01
Received the David E. Rogers Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges, honoring a medical school faculty member who has made major contributions to improving the health and healthcare of the American people.

Megan E. King, MBA ’03, LAW ’03
Recipient of the Philadelphia Business Journal’s 2015 Corporate Counsel Award, which recognizes the top corporate attorneys in the Philadelphia region. King is general counsel of Brandywine Realty Trust.

Ariell Johnson, BBA ’05
Opened Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse in Philadelphia in January, becoming the first black woman-owned comic book store in the United States.

Yasmine Mustafa, BBA ’06
Shattered her crowdfunding campaign goal by more than 650 percent for her company ROAR for Good’s product Athena, a piece of wearable self- defense tech jewelry designed with one-touch technology. Also she was named to Billy Penn’s “Who’s Next” list of Philadelphia’s up-and-coming STEM leaders.

Michael P. Ginnetti, MBA ’06
Appointed interim chief financial officer, interim principal financial officer, and interim principal accounting officer of Dorman Products, a leading supplied or original equipment, dealer-exclusive replacement automotive parts. He had served as the company’s corporate controller.

Alex Mobarak, BBA ’07
Hired as controller of Cargas Solutions, a business software and consulting firm based in Lancaster, Pa.

Sylvester Mobley, BBA ’07
Named to Billy Penn’s “Who’s Next” list of Philadelphia’s up-and-coming STEM leaders for his work as executive director of Coded By Kids, an organization that provides free weekly coding education programs to children.

2010s

Angela Moemeka, MBA ’10
Featured prominently within the  Dallas  Medical  Journal,  in a story delving into children’s health and community health. Moemeka is the vice president and medical director of community health for Children’s Health System, in Dallas.

Darryl Singleton, BBA ’11
Named store manager of TD Bank’s Conshohocken, Pa., branch.

Natily Santos, MBA ’14
Spotlighted in October by Al Dia News, in a story on “The Rise of the Latino Corporate Leader in Philadelphia.” Santos is the regional procurement manager at Aramark, a Philadelphia-based foodservice, facilities, and clothing provider.

Will Cummings, BBA ’15
Selected to the NBA Development League All-Star Game. The point guard, who started with the Temple men’s basketball team, plays for the Rio Grande Valley Vipers, the D-League affiliate of the Houston Rockets.

To submit a Class Note, email your accomplishments, promotions, and achievements to khamm@temple.edu

Exterior photo of Alter HallThe Fox School of Business at Temple University will introduce new academic programs for the 2016-17 academic year.

A Bachelor of Science program in Statistical Science and Data Analytics headlines the new offerings by the Fox School, and joins two undergraduate minors in Leadership and International Business Administration.

At the graduate level, students can elect for MBA concentrations in either Business Analytics or Enterprise Risk Management. In Fall 2016, Fox also will launch a Master of Science degree program in Business Analytics.

“The addition of new programs and concentrations demonstrate our reputation as one of the nation’s most-comprehensive business schools,” said Dr. M. Moshe Porat, Dean of the Fox School of Business. “Employers and industry partners agree that these areas represent emerging fields and areas of study wherein professionals and leaders are in great demand, and we have the diverse, renowned faculty to answer the call of industry and these support programs.”

The undergraduate major in Statistical Science and Data Analysis will provide students with the ability to select, utilize and apply quantitative reasoning and data analytic skills to their future fields of study, according to program director Dr. Alexandra Carides, Associate Professor of Statistical Science.

The minor in International Business Administration incorporates the nationally ranked curriculum of Fox’s undergraduate-degree program in International Business. The minor requires only four courses and four prerequisites, delivering the cornerstones of international business education while offering students the opportunity to complete a study-abroad trip in the process.

The minor in Leadership cultivates stronger interpersonal skills for effective management and leadership positions. With courses focusing on workplace demands for leadership from both the organizational and interpersonal points of view, the minor allows students to move beyond technical competence as they step into leadership roles in industry.

The MBA concentration in Business Analytics is designed to enable graduate students to use data and models to recognize opportunities and to improve organizational decision-making. “Data-driven decision-making has been shown to have large positive effects on outcomes of interest to organizations of all types,” said Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management Dr. Eric Eisenstein, the concentration’s director. “Business Analytics concentrators will meet the growing demand for talent in the areas of managing, analyzing, predicting, and discovering insights from the complex data that is available to modern corporations.”

The MBA concentration in Enterprise Risk Management, offered by one of the most-prestigious Risk Management programs in the nation, will prepare MBA students to design and implement state-of-the-art processes that enhance and improve organizational strategic decision-making, how it manages risk across the enterprise, as well as improving traditional risk mitigation decisions. “This concentration will provide MBA candidates with the concepts and tools to develop advanced organizational risk management capabilities and pursue executive responsibility for managing enterprise-wide risks,” said Assistant Professor of Risk, Insurance, and Healthcare Management Dr. M. Michael Zuckerman, the concentration’s director.

All eligibility and declaration questions regarding the new undergraduate major and minors should be referred to Fox’s Center for Undergraduate Advising. Graduate students are encouraged to speak with their program advisors for more details about new curricula.

Alexander Brannan, Lily Tran, Abbey Harris, Rachel BakerHow sweet it is.

Marketing majors from Temple University’s student chapter of the American Marketing Association (AMA) won the parent organization’s annual Collegiate Case Competition by delivering a marketing strategy for a product from event sponsor The Hershey Company.

The Temple AMA team took top honors ahead of the University of Pennsylvania, Texas State University, and Ferris State University, among other tough competitors. The team of marketing students from the Fox School of Business assembled a thorough, research-driven marketing plan for Hershey’s Ice Breakers Cool Blast Chews, emerging from a field of 91 college chapters to claim first place in the prestigious competition for the first time. The $3,000 top prize will be allotted toward defraying costs related to next year’s case competition, the team said.

“This puts our chapter on the map,” said junior Lily Tran. “Now, other chapters across the country and internationally will look to us as a prime example of what it takes to win.”

The Temple AMA all-junior presentation team comprised Tran, Abbey Harris, Rachel Baker, and Alexander Brannan. The written case team included seniors Taylor Sauder, Rachel Zydyk, and Jennifer McGill. Temple AMA was one of 10 national finalists invited to deliver a presentation at the AMA International Collegiate Conference, held March 17-20 in New Orleans.

The final presentation culminated more than seven months of original research, situation analysis, conducting focus groups and surveys, and marketing recommendations by the Temple AMA team. The group had submitted its written case to AMA in December and, one month later, learned that it had been selected as one of the 10 finalists. From there, they delivered a number of “dry-run presentations,” said Dr. Craig Atwater, Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at Temple’s Fox School of Business, and one of Temple AMA’s three faculty advisors.

Photo of the American Marketing Association (AMA) Collegiate Case Competition award.“Our team took tips from the faculty members and PhD students to whom they made their practice presentations and fine-tuned the presentation until it was perfectly polished,” Atwater said. “Their focus groups and taste tests also helped our students determine that the product’s positioning was ambiguous. It’s not a gum, as it dissolves within 15 seconds, and yet it’s not a mint. It’s instead classified within a subcategory, as a power-mint. Our students found that for millennials, who enjoy trying new things, this product is cool and fun, but they found that it also required an explanation.”

Those elements proved critical to the Temple AMA team’s presentation, which the group delivered before a trio of high-ranking executives from Hershey. Then, the marketing students waited until all other names had been announced before celebrating their victory.

“While awaiting the results, I remember counting the spots and losing count because my heart started to pound,” said Harris. “TU-AMA is improving in reputation thanks to our incredible faculty advisors – Dr. Craig Atwater, Professor Jim Thompson, and Dr. Drew Allmond – our talented Fox School professors, and the support of the Marketing department.”

Added Baker: “I believe our success is a direct tribute to Temple University’s dedicated faculty, who over the past three years have consistently encouraged innovation in team settings, fostered perseverance, taught us how to think strategically, and have pushed us to reach our potential.”

A study measuring the impact of pharmaceutical commercial operations on company performance finds that strategic investment in commercial innovation, linked with an aligned and responsive culture of execution, can produce positive results.

The study, “What Makes More Better? An Exploratory Study on the Effects of Firm-Level Commercial Operations Attributes on Pharmaceutical Business Performance,” appears in the current issue of the Journal of Medical Marketing.

Authored by Dr. George A. Chressanthis, Professor of Healthcare Management and Marketing at Temple University’s Fox School of Business, the independent study was funded through an unrestricted grant from TGaS Advisors, a benchmarking and advisory services firm for pharmaceutical operations. Dr. Eric M. Eisenstein, Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at the Fox School, and Dr. Patrick A. Barbro, of the Rohrer School of Business at Rowan University, are the study’s co-authors.

According to Chressanthis, this is the first such independent research study on the effects of qualitative and quantitative measures of commercial operations on business performance. “The depth and breadth of the TGaS database, together with their qualitative insights, made the study possible,” he said.

Chressanthis says that today’s pharmaceutical environment requires companies to think holistically from the earliest stages of clinical development about the value-based assessment of new drugs. The researcher concludes that “strategic investments in commercial operations can help companies bring drugs to market faster while clearly demonstrating value important to key stakeholders.” Chressanthis compares the underlying culture required for this to a “fertile field” where innovation coupled with execution lays the foundation, noting they operate synergistically to affect business performance.

“Companies that are commercially innovative but do not have the ability to execute strategic policies will not be effective. Likewise, companies that are commercially aligned but without innovative business strategies to execute will also not be effective,” he said.

The study draws on TGaS Advisors’ proprietary commercial operations dataset using anonymized data from 26 large, medium and specialty pharmaceutical companies and interviews with TGaS operations professionals. Findings and recommendations were developed independently of TGaS.

“We commissioned this study as an investment in our commercial operations partners,” said TGaS President Gary McWalters. “It provides independent confirmation of what we’ve learned from more than a decade of engagement on the operational side and makes the case for strategic investment in innovation linked to execution.”

Peyton Closes in on the 59th Most Impressive Record in Sports
Last weekend, Denver quarterback Peyton Manning broke the NFL’s career passing yards record. Where does it rank among all-time sports records? It’s low on the list, according to a research study published in the “Journal of Sports Analytics,” and co-authored by Dr. Howard J. Weiss, Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management.

Jean Wilcox | October 20, 2015| The Temple News

November 5, 2015 //

Fighting against sexual assault
Six male students from a course taught by Dr. Jean Wilcox, Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, are working with Fox alumna Yasmine Mustafa and her company, ROAR for Good, which has brought to market wearable self-defense technology jewelry designed for women.

How to bridge the business-education gap
In the first of a series of guest-commentary submissions to PBJ, Dennis Paris, an adjunct instructor within Fox’s Marketing and Supply Chain Management department, delivers his take on bridging the business-education gap.

The Fox School of Business at Temple University introduced two new undergraduate majors for the 2015-16 academic year: Supply Chain Management and Financial Planning.

In all, the Fox School offers students a choice of 15 undergraduate majors.

The Supply Chain Management major prepares students to operate and lead major aspects of the supply system in both established and start-up firms. Fox’s Marketing and Supply Chain Management department oversees the program, which readies students for careers in the interconnected chain of suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses and distribution centers, transportation-providers, retailers.

“Businesses today operate on a global scale,” said Dr. Neha Mittal, Assistant Professor and Academic Director of the undergraduate Supply Chain Management program. “For example, it’s very common for a company to have its sourcing in South America, manufacturing in China, and sales of its products to markets in Europe or North America. We’re talking about huge, complex supply chains here, which have fueled the need for supply chain management professionals to manage the flows between the different parties.”

The Financial Planning major prepares students for careers in the growing field bearing the same name, which takes a holistic approach to working with clients in order to enable them to identify and attain lifestyle and retirement goals. Students who complete the Financial Planning curriculum are eligible to sit for the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) examination upon graduation – a unique feature of the program. Fox’s Finance department oversees the program, and draws upon the expertise of faculty in Fox’s Legal Studies and Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management departments, as well, said Cynthia Axelrod, Assistant Professor and Financial Planning Program Director.

“Within the next 20 years, 10,000 baby boomers will retire every day. This will produce a tremendous intergenerational wealth transfer, for which there won’t be nearly enough advisors to take on the burgeoning growth of clients and client assets,” Axelrod said.

Pope’s visit shines media spotlight on Temple faculty, students
Dr. Elizabeth H. Barber, Associate Dean of the School of Tourism and Hospitality Management; Dr. Wesley Roehl; and Jennifer Fitzgerald, Instructor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at Fox were highlighted in a recent edition of a university-wide e-newsletter for their media placements related to Pope Francis’ visit to Philadelphia.

creeck
Why do break-ups sometimes send people reaching for ice cream? Why does retail shopping provide a perk during a bad day?

For Dr. Crystal Reeck, Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at the Fox School of Business, the answers reside in a person’s ability to regulate emotions in order to make adaptive decisions.

“What is it that other people can do to turn up or down others’ feelings to shape their behavior?” Reeck wondered during her latest collaborative research project, ‘The Social Regulation of Emotion: An Integrative, Cross-Disciplinary Model.’

“Whenever we’re stressed, tired, cranky, or scared, we tend to do things how we wouldn’t otherwise. That’s not groundbreaking. But what’s missing in that approach is not only how emotions shift people’s processes, but that we’re not slaves to our feelings. We have some control over how we react to things.”

For Reeck, whose research is to be published in a forthcoming edition of Trends in Cognitive Sciences, the key to controlling that heartbroken appeal for ice cream or those stress-induced consumer purchases lies in a person’s dedication to a goal. If losing a few pounds or saving for retirement comprise a person’s long-term goals, he or she can learn to ignore immediate self-satisfaction from behaviors that may derail them.

Part of this process, Reeck said, is examining how a person views new information. Reeck’s research shows that people tend to synthesize information through the lens of a current goal. Therefore, when a development impedes that goal, he or she can become frustrated and become more likely to react negatively. This negative interaction directly impacts workplace environments, for example, when a disagreement between co-workers or criticism from senior leaders is internalized negatively.

“It requires a poker-face mode. It’s the stiff upper lip,” said Reeck, who also serves as Assistant Director of Temple University’s Center for Neural Decision Making. “A person may still be just as upset as they were to begin with, but they don’t know about it.”

This method of reacting to an emotional response often leads to increasingly negative experiences. The solution, Reeck said, is in changing one’s interpretation. If someone’s work is criticized, Reeck suggests that instead of an employee interpreting it as a failure, perhaps that person can see it as a chance to improve.

In the business world, managing the emotional responses of several people becomes critical to a functioning workflow. Investigating how to do so is a new edge in Reeck’s work, she said, and involves a synthesis of past research examining purely individual emotional regulation.

“People have studied this as a silo with different methods and theories,” Reeck said. “We’re trying to unpack the psychological processes that underpin that emotion regulation exchange between two people. In other words, how can one person change another’s emotional response?”

John AloysiusDr. John Aloysius, who earned his doctoral degree from Temple University’s Fox School of Business, has been appointed the director of a major business research lab at the University of Arkansas.

John Aloysius, PhD ’96, was named interim director of the Sam M. Walton College of Business’ Behavioral Business Research Lab at University of Arkansas. He will hold this position for the remainder of the 2015-16 academic year, while colleague Cary Deck serves a one-year visiting professorship.

Arkansas’ Behavioral Business Research Lab is a unique, multi-user facility for economics, marketing, information systems and supply chain faculty, said Aloysius, who earned his Fox PhD in Operations Management. The center is an interdisciplinary resource geared toward the study of human behavior and decision making. It features state-of-the-art computer equipment that will assist in marketing- and retail-based experiments.

Aloysius, an associate professor of supply chain management at Arkansas, said he conducts a majority of his research within the lab. He examines how consumers use mobile technology in a retail context, looking into the use of coupons, product reviews and promotional activities in influencing shoppers. This research has been published in Management Information Systems Quarterly.

“If you entice them at the precise moment, consumers can go from being a browser to being a buyer,” Aloysius said.

Aloysius’ other research pursuits delve into privacy and security issues for shoppers and inventory management.

“Managers stand in front of monitors that have information about how much inventory there is and the distribution of demand,” he said. “They are trying to figure out what a company would need to order to put product on the shelf.”

Dr. Edward C. Rosenthal, Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at the Fox School, served as Aloysius’ dissertation chair while he pursued his Fox PhD. Rosenthal said he encouraged Aloysius to conduct his research independently. In his dissertation, Aloysius applied game theory to cost-sharing problems in the telecommunications industry, which evolved into an interest in decision making and how people apply technology in the retail industry.

“He was a bright student who was motivated and great to work alongside,” Rosenthal said. “I think that John’s assuming of the directorship of the Behavioral Business Research Lab at the University of Arkansas had its origins while he was a graduate student here at Fox all of those years ago. “

Aloysius said he hopes to widen the lab’s horizons by working with external local firms and incorporating new technology.

“What is happening in retail blurs the line between physical stores and online shopping, and in the lab as well,” he said. “It is a natural extension.”

Aloysius plans to reconnect with his Fox School colleagues while visiting Philadelphia in November for the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science conference (INFORMS). He said he plans to meet with Rosenthal and current research colleague Dr. Misty Blessley, an Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at Fox.

Aloysius and Blessley are collaborating on experimental research into switching behavior under various conditions of psychological contact breach. The experiment will move into the data-collection phase in November. “What I like about John is he challenges you to look over your research meticulously,” Blessley said.

“At Arkansas, John has become more deeply involved with the behavioral aspects of supply chain management research and leading their behavioral business research lab is a natural next step,” Rosenthal said.

Temple Magazine, Fall 2015 Edition
Fox School faculty are highlighted in the latest edition of Temple University’s alumni magazine: Research by Dr. Maureen “Mimi” Morrin, Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, into the affects of fragrance on consumers’ purchasing habits appears on page 8; Dr. Youngjin Yoo, the Harry A. Cochran Professor of Management Information Systems, and the Apps & Maps Studios appear on page 26; and Fox School rankings appear on page 5.

In another piece written in the lead-up to Pope Francis’ visit, Jennifer Fitzgerald, from Fox’s Marketing and Supply Chain Management department, discussed with the Bucks County Courier-Times how retailers were planning to capitalize on the Pope’s visit through merchandise sales. (Download screenshots of the article, which has been archived and is available only to subscribers: image 1 and image 2)