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Dr. Paul A Pavlou, the Milton F. Stauffer Professor of Information Technology and Strategy at the Fox School of Business, recently earned recognition as a world leader in scientific research.

Pavlou was named one of Thomson Reuters’ World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds, which published its list of highly cited researchers in June. Pavlou earned the distinction from the Intellectual Property and Science business branch of Thomson Reuters for citations of his work in a 10-year period, between 2002-2012.

The Associate Dean of Research and Chief Research Officer at the Fox School, Pavlou joined more than 3,000 fellow scholars across 21 fields of study for being among the world’s most-highly cited researchers in his or her specialty. Pavlou’s papers registered more than 13,000 citations over the last decade, as he became one of 95 Highly Cited researchers recognized by Thomson Reuters in the field of Economics & Business.

“I do research for my own motivation, because I like to discover new things,” Pavlou said, “but it is a great recognition that others rely on your work and cite your work.”

This is not the first such world-wide recognition of Pavlou’s research. He was rated as the world’s most-productive researcher in the two top management information systems journals MIS Quarterly and Information Systems Research, according to an analysis by the Association of Information Systems for the period 2010-2012.

Pavlou said he anticipates that his latest personal accolade, from Thomson Reuters, will render a double-edged impact at the Fox School. One of Pavlou’s goals, he said, is to continue to build Fox’s sterling reputation through highly cited, published papers from its students.

“I like to push the mentality that it’s not only (important) to get published, but to get published in well-read, well-respected journals,” he said. “Getting published by itself is not easy. But if you can take it to the next level and say, ‘This is something people will read and cite,’ that’s what I’m really trying to do.”

 

Fox School’s MIS department named “a major national player” by review team

 Fox Update August2014

Discussed in this issue:
• New Online Master of Science Degree combines marketing and technology
• Pavlou distinguished as one of world’s top scientific minds
• NBCUniversal CIO Atish Banerjea joins Fox IT Advisory Board

The Fox School of Business’s Department of Management Information Systems was named “a major national player” in a report by a review team that systematically evaluated the department.

The review team included internationally recognized professors from Oklahoma State University and The University of Texas at Austin. The reviewers were selected by Temple University’s Office of the Provost based upon their stature in the MIS discipline. According to the team which submitted a report after evaluating a self-study document and following a two-day site visit: “The MIS department at Temple is one of the best examples of how good leadership and investment can create a stellar program in such a short time.”

According to Jodi Levine Laufgraben, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, Assessment and Institutional Research who oversees the review process: “Temple University implemented Periodic Program Review in 2003 and since that time has conducted over 90 reviews. Now in our second cycle, the program review process gives us the opportunity to evaluate the quality of our academic programs while also providing advice on strategic opportunities for further improvement.”

The review team evaluated departmental research performance, noting: “Faculty in MIS at Fox have achieved national reputation and catapulted the MIS department to a very high rank in terms of research publications.”

“I am very grateful to the review team for their comprehensive and positive report,” said Fox School Dean M. Moshe Porat, who decided to form the MIS department in 2000. “It is a great honor to receive accolades for our MIS department from such distinguished scholars representing major national universities.”

The team met students and reviewed the MIS academic programs. “Students in the MIS department at Fox are the major beneficiaries of all the exciting activities and initiatives underway,” the report stated. “These include an innovative curriculum, internships, industry interactions, professional development opportunities, and placements.”

The review team recommended areas for improvement, including hiring more faculty, creating endowed chairs and investing further in analytics. Finally, the review team commended the department for excellent relationships with industry through an active advisory board, innovative research centers and institutes, vibrant professional faculty and visionary, stable, and collaborative departmental leadership.

For perpetrators of petty crimes, a handful of high school students think they’ve “Gotcha!”

Eleven students participating in a program through Temple University’s Center for Design + Innovation, which is led by Fox School of Business professor Youngjin Yoo, are working to develop a social-media network that encourages the reporting of crime through community activism.

The students in the program, called the Urban Apps & Maps Studio, have laid the foundation for ‘Gotcha!’ For now, the students see their creation as a web-based platform within which a witness or a victim of underreported criminal acts – like theft or vandalism – can report the location, time and circumstances of the purported activity.

Gotcha!, the students said, has the potential to curb crime, as well as alter the patrol assignments of local police departments, dependent upon the locational frequency of crimes, as indicated through a real-time map feature their platform incorporates.

The students envision Gotcha! eventually transitioning into a mobile application. They believe they can have their web app running in the fall, before most of them get into the thick of their senior years of high school, though they will need to secure a patent and a domain name in order to do so.

“We built this in four weeks,” said Kory Calicat-Wayns, a rising senior year at The Haverford School. “The possibilities are out there for us. We plan to take this very far, so we can cover not just Philadelphia, but maybe the entire nation.”

Crime-map sites similar to Gotcha! exist, but none incorporates a newfeed, social-media component like the one designed by the students in Urban Apps and Maps, said Michael Korostelev, a graduate-student instructor of the program.

In other ways, the offerings of Gotcha! overlap with those of preexisting programs. The students said users will have to register, with a log-in name, zip code and phone number to which only the site’s administrators will have access. And posts made anonymously will require a vetting process and approval from Gotcha! administrators to verify their credibility.

“And to avoid spam and other fraudulent reports,” said Jimik Ligon, who will soon begin his senior year at Simon Gratz High School. “We want to help stop small crimes any way we can, and we’re planning full cooperation with the police to help in that.”

“We want to build a sense of community through Gotcha!, so people know what’s going on in their neighborhoods,” Calicat-Wayns said.

Gotcha! is one of several projects to have been generated through the 200 participants this summer in Urban Apps & Maps, which is in its second year.

“Through this program, we’re not just teaching coding. That’s not enough,” said Yoo, a Professor of Management Information Systems at the Fox School. “They need to know where that coding skill will apply to.”

Hundreds of leading management and organization scholars will descend upon Philadelphia, and professors from Temple University’s Fox School of Business professors will be among them.

Philadelphia serves as the host city for the 74th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, which runs Aug. 1-5.

More than 25 Fox School professors will participate in the meeting in various capacities, such as presenters, panelists, and distinguished speakers. One of them is David Schuff, who serves as Academic Director of Fox’s Executive DBA program, will serve as a distinguished speaker for Saturday’s session titled, “DBA’s Critical Success Factors: Spanning Research and Practice.” TL Hill, Associate Professor of Strategic Marketing, will be a discussant on that same panel.

“The Academy of Management is a large, interdisciplinary conference. The wide range of faculty participating in the conference demonstrates the diversity of expertise within our school,” said Dr. Schuff, who’s also an Associate Professor of Management Information Systems.

Representatives from Fox School’s Strategic Management department expected to participate include: At “International Management Thought Leadership,” Associate Professor Susan Feinberg will be the distinguished speaker; Gerry F. Lenfest Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Mitrabarun Sarkar will participate in a talk titled, “Business Policy and Strategy Division Dissertation Consortium”; at “An Evolving Landscape: The Reconfiguration of Global Value Chain Activity,” Professor Ram Mudambi will be a discussant; at “CSR and Sustainability in Asia,” Associate Professor Nicolas Dahan will serve as chair; and Associate Professor Sheryl Winston Smith will chair “New Venture Learning Through Accelerators, VCs and Universities,” among others.

Alter Hall, home of the Fox School, is also slated to host a variety of events throughout the meeting, from doctoral consortia to a professional development workshop. Attendees are looking forward to showcasing the accomplishments and innovation of the Fox School.

“It’s exciting to share what we’ve done at Fox in launching the new Executive DBA program and to learn what others are doing,” said Dr. Schuff. “Research-intensive, practice-focused DBA programs are still a novel concept within business schools, especially in the United States. Taking an active role in the community of schools launching these programs is important to our program’s success.”

For a full list of meeting proceedings, click here.

Dr. Paul A Pavlou, the Chief Research Officer and Associate Dean of Research at the Fox School of Business, recently earned recognition as a world leader in scientific research.

Pavlou was named one of the World’s Most-Influential Scientific Minds for 2014 by the Intellectual Property and Science business branch of Thomson Reuters, which published its list of honorees in June.

The Milton F. Stauffer Professor of Information Technology and Strategy at the Fox School, Pavlou joined more than 3,000 fellow scholars across 21 fields of study for being among the world’s most-highly cited researchers in his or her specialty. Pavlou’s papers registered more than 12,000 citations over the last decade, as he became one of 95 researchers honored by Thomson Reuters in the field of Economics & Business.

“I do research for my own personal motivation, because I like to discover new things,” Pavlou said, “but it is a great recognition that others rely on your work and cite your work.”

This is not the first such recognition of Pavlou’s research. In 2011, he was rated as the world’s most-productive researcher by top management information systems journals MIS Quarterly and Information Systems Research, according to an analysis by the Association of Information Systems for the period 2010-2012.

Pavlou said he anticipates that his latest personal accolade, from Thomson Reuters, will render a double-edged impact at the Fox School. One of Pavlou’s goals, he said, is to continue to build Fox’s sterling reputation through highly cited, published papers from its students.

“I like to push the mentality that it’s not only (important) to get published, but to get published in well-read, well-respected journals,” he said. “Getting published by itself is not easy. Some may say, ‘It got published. I don’t care if nobody cites it. It’s there.’ But if you can take it to the next level and say, ‘This is something people will read, publish, cite,’ that’s what I’m trying to do.”

When Bernard J. Milano, BS ’61, led the formation of the PhD Project in 1994 to support African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans in attaining their business PhDs and becoming professors, there were fewer than 300 people of color in the country with doctorates in business.

As the PhD Project celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, more than 1,230 minority professors teach in business schools (slightly over 4 percent of the total), and there are about 330 minority doctoral students in business disciplines.

“We’ve multiplied the role models and the awareness, and more and more students are going to experience seeing a faculty member of color, which means that if they’re a person of color this might be a career they aspire to because they’ve experienced it firsthand,” said Milano, who in May 2014 received the Distinguished Alumni Award from the Fox School’s Department of Accounting.

The PhD Project includes five minority Doctoral Students Associations (DSAs) to support members who are pursuing business doctoral degrees in accounting, finance, information systems, management and marketing. The organization hosts summer conferences for doctoral students in conjunction with meetings of professional associations — for example, the American Accounting Association — so current doctoral students and those who are about to embark on their programs can establish their networks from the beginning.

The PhD Project also leads an invitation only conference in the fall for those considering applying to doctoral programs. Last year, the over 350 attendees could network with more than 100 U.S. doctoral programs.

“A doctoral program is like walking into a house with lots of rooms,” Milano said, emphasizing that for many students it’s a complete departure from their careers to shift focus to academics. “You don’t know what’s in the next room, and you might be shocked at what you see. We open all those doors so that even before a person starts, they know what happens at each successive stage so they have more confidence and more courage.” The supportive network pays dividends:

The completion rate among doctoral students affiliated with the PhD Project’s DSAs is approximately 90 percent. And 97 percent of PhD recipients who come through the PhD Project stay in academia, serving as role models and  mentors on business-school faculty.

When Milano started the PhD Project, he was leading national recruiting for KPMG. During the five decades Milano has been with the firm, he has held positions of increasing responsibility, including national partner in charge of university relations and national partner in charge of human resources.

He is currently president and board  member of the KPMG Foundation, which  supports business schools and students  with special emphasis on accounting  programs; the KPMG Disaster Relief Fund, which provides funds to qualified charitable organizations and to KPMG partners and employees who have suffered financial losses due to natural disasters; and the PhD Project.

“People in the academic world have said this is the most powerful, most successful diversity initiative they have experienced, and when you think about it, we’ve put in a sustainable, long-term change,” said  Milano, who was awarded the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education’s 2013 Advocacy Award.

“We know that when a person becomes a professor and stands in front of that classroom and teaches three sections a week over a 20-year career, they’re going to be impacting thousands of lives,” he added. “Almost all of us can point to a teacher or a professor who has turned our head and given us confidence to pursue a certain direction.” –Brandon Lausch

Two Fox School of Business professors and their College of Science and Technology research partner recently received a $95,000 grant from French research foundation CIGREF for a project developing the new interdisciplinary field of organizational genetics, which applies analytic tools used in evolutionary biology to the study of organizational processes. This is the third grant the project has attracted thus far and brings the project’s total funding to about $400,000.

The grant proposal was sent to CIGREF by Assistant Professor of Biology Rob Kulathinal, Fox Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems (MIS) Sunil Wattal and Fox MIS Professor Youngjin Yoo. Their proposal received the highest score among all proposals sent to CIGREF this year. The research has also received funding from Fox’s Young Scholar Forum, a bi-annual event that provides seed funding to Fox faculty and PhD students with interdisciplinary research projects.

The organizational genetics project is titled “VOSS-Collaborative Research: Evolution in Virtualized Design Processes in Project-Based Design Organizations,” and is led by Kulathinal and Yoo, who is also director of Temple University’s Center for Design+Innovation, which is based at the Fox School.

The project’s inspiration came when the researchers noticed that technological innovations develop in patterns resembling the evolution of natural organisms. The researchers hope that identifying the underlying traits driving this technological evolution will enable business leaders to maximize firms’ innovation and performance.

The research – which targets the automotive, microprocessor and building industries – also seeks to hasten other industries’ technological breakthroughs, from eco-friendly smart-grids in the energy sector, to “pervasive healthcare” in the medical sector, to social media.

“This shows that the investments that the school is making to support interdisciplinary research pays off,” Yoo said. “I hope Fox continues to encourage our junior colleagues as well as doctoral students to aim at innovative and groundbreaking ideas.”

– Carl O’Donnell

Dr. Paul A Pavlou, the Chief Research Officer and Associate Dean of Research at the Fox School of Business, recently earned recognition as a world leader in scientific research.

Pavlou was named one of Thomson Reuters’ 2014 World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds, which published its list of honorees in June. Pavlou earned the distinction from the Intellectual Property and Science business branch of Thomson Reuters for citations of his work in a 10-year period, between 2002-2012.

The Milton F. Stauffer Professor of Information Technology and Strategy at the Fox School, Pavlou joined more than 3,000 fellow scholars across 21 fields of study for being among the world’s most-highly cited researchers in his or her specialty. Pavlou’s papers registered more than 12,000 citations over the last decade, as he became one of 95 researchers honored by Thomson Reuters in the field of Economics & Business.

“I do research for my own personal motivation, because I like to discover new things,” Pavlou said, “but it is a great recognition that others rely on your work and cite your work.”

This is not the first such recognition of Pavlou’s research. In 2011, he was rated as the world’s most-productive researcher by top management information systems journals MIS Quarterly and Information Systems Research, according to an analysis by the Association of Information Systems for the period 2010-2012.

Pavlou said he anticipates that his latest personal accolade, from Thomson Reuters, will render a double-edged impact at the Fox School. One of Pavlou’s goals, he said, is to continue to build Fox’s sterling reputation through highly cited, published papers from its students.

“I like to push the mentality that it’s not only (important) to get published, but to get published in well-read, well-respected journals,” he said. “Getting published by itself is not easy. Some may say, ‘It got published. I don’t care if nobody cites it. It’s there.’ But if you can take it to the next level and say, ‘This is something people will read, publish, cite,’ that’s what I’m trying to do.”

Youngjin Yoo, professor of management information systems (MIS) and director of the Temple Center for Design+Innovation, has been appointed senior editor for MIS Quarterly (MISQ), one of the premier journals in the discipline. His term, which started May 1, extends to June 30, 2016. He also started his duty as senior editor of Journal of the Association for Information Systems for the Interdisciplinary and Path Breaking Research section as of Sept. 1, 2013.

In addition, his paper titled, Toward Generalizable Sociomaterial Inquiry: A Computational Approach for ‘Zooming In & Out’ of Sociomaterial Routines, has recently been accepted for publication in MISQ. The paper was derived from research on organizational genetics, which applies analytic tools used in evolutionary biology to the study of organizational processes.

“I am humbled by the responsibility of these editorial positions,” Yoo said. “My research often focuses on the fringe of so-called mainstream of our community where I believe a lot of interesting and innovative ideas emerge. I would like to help other colleagues who pursue such innovative research programs in publishing and disseminating their ideas.”

Yoo, working with MIS Assistant Professors Sunil Wattal and Bin Zang, as well as Temple biology Assistant Professor Rob Kulathinal, has received $675,000 in grant funding for organizational genetics research from the National Science Foundation and French research foundation CIGREF.

Yoo is also principal investigator for Temple’s Urban Apps and Maps Studios, a university-wide initiative in which Temple students and faculty work with community members to create data sets and apps that address real city needs. Yoo particularly wants local middle- and high-school students to participate in hopes that they will grow into “civil digital entrepreneurs.”

Among his other recent achievements, Yoo was ranked ninth globally for research output, from 2010 to 2012, in the top two MIS journals: MISQ and Information Systems Research. He was also named one of the 52 “bold minds” in Philadelphia Magazine’s 2012 list of The Smartest People in Philadelphia.  –Alexis Wright-Whitley

Mike Obal, a fifth-year PhD candidate in the Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at the Fox School of Business, recently won the 2013 Robert Robicheaux Dissertation Proposal Award from the Society for Marketing Advances (SMA).

“It’s just really exciting to win an international award,” he said. “I know that it’s the type of award that people from various countries compete for, so it’s nice to get that recognition from a reputable, external organization.”

Those who had meritorious dissertation proposals with a research focus in supply chain management or business-to-business marketing were encouraged to apply for the award from SMA. Proposals were evaluated through a blind-review format. SMA, a premier marketing association, hosts an annual conference that brings together marketing educators and professionals from throughout the United States and abroad. It currently has members from 34 countries.

Obal’s dissertation examines the adoption and acceptance of disruptive technologies within firms. Disruptive technologies are a type of technology that starts as a niche product but falls short of a primary technology. Over time, this type of technology improves to the point that it actually replaces the primary technology, therefore disrupting the market.

“However, predicting what technologies will be disruptive and which ones won’t has been a long-standing issue in marketing, management information systems and other fields,” Obal said.

He specifically studied cloud computing and how firms are deciding whether to move away from more traditional software in favor of cloud computing platforms.

Obal was drawn to this type of research because he saw an opportunity to fill gaps in academic literature and a lack of understanding of key technologies, such as cloud computing, from a practitioner’s standpoint. Companies that consider purchasing this type of technology consistently have issues in determining who to buy the products from and what to look for in cloud-computing packages.

“It’s this realistic sort of issue that firms don’t necessarily have a straight answer for,” Obal said.

In February 2013, Obal completed his dissertation proposal, titled “Analyzing the Roles of Buyers, Suppliers and Employees on the Adoption of Disruptive Technology.” As part of the SMA recognition, he won a trip to Hilton Head, S.C., where he will receive a $500 award.

Obal’s research interests also include trust development in online marketplaces, the usage of online interpersonal ties in purchasing decisions and the role of interorganizational relationships on technology adoption.

Obal has published in Industrial Marketing Management, the Journal of Service Management and the International Journal of Integrated Marketing Communications. He has also presented at conferences — including the American Marketing Association (AMA), the Academy of Marketing Science (AMS), and the Product Development and Management Association (PDMA) — and represented Temple at the 2012 AMA-Sheth Foundation Doctoral Consortium.

Before coming to the Fox School, Obal was an instructor of business and coordinator for the Community Center for Entrepreneurship at Bunker Hill Community College. He has also worked as a search-marketing specialist at iProspect, a sales manager at the Boston Beer Company and a graduate assistant at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Obal obtained an MBA in marketing from UMass Boston and a BS in marketing from Syracuse University. –Alexis Wright-Whitley

Many companies and organizations have set up defenses to keep hackers on the outside, protecting the information of their customers and clients. However, with increasingly sophisticated use of malware, some hackers can sit silently within a company’s information systems for years without being detected.

A new report from the Temple University Institute for Business and Information Technology (IBIT), at the Fox School of Business, examines advanced persistent threats to information assets by using the medieval analogy of barbarians inside the gate.

In December 2013, retail chain Target announced a security breach resulting in 40 million credit and debit card records being compromised. Other retail chains such as 7-Eleven and Carrefour have also suffered attacks, having 160 million credit and debit card numbers exposed. Hackers have also targeted Nasdaq and bank accounts at Citigroup and PNC.

“My goal with the article was to raise people’s awareness, which is the most powerful tool [for security enhancement],” said Gregory Senko, associate director of the Fox School’s Master of Science in Information Technology Auditing and Cyber-Security program. “I wanted to make people aware that there is a risk and they need the proper tools to know when they are being attacked.”

While working on a book, Security Intelligence – How Big Data and Machine Learning can tackle the increasingly complex world of Cyber Security, Senko realized that the rate of persistent polymorphic attacks is growing and that more vendors are developing tools intended to address these threats.

Symantec, a leading information security company, noted the escalated rate of reported Advanced Persistent Threats (APT). In November 2013, the number of reported APT attacks increased to about 118 from only 57 in November 2012. “We’re likely to see a
big wave of aggressive attacks,” Senko said.

The Stuxnet virus in 2010-11 served as the first well-publicized appearance of a successful, state-sponsored act of modern cyber warfare. This virus inspired hackers to employ analytics, reverse engineering and code cannibalization to design malware that was able to circumvent traditional security arrangements that recognize threats as patterns in digital transmissions. This allowed hackers to penetrate networks that seemed secure,
operating stealthily over extended periods of time. These attacks are known as Advanced Persistent Threats.

Senko recommends four transformative steps to achieve even more robust enterprise security.

First, he urges companies to strengthen their fundamental security processes. This means spending money to pay for up-to-date perimeter security and employing well-educated security engineers and well-informed employees.

Second, Senko recommends companies to look at metrics used for performance management, issue identification and problem mitigation, from a more security-oriented perspective. According to the report, “this same data may yield opportunities to identify
subtle changes in activity that underlie a persistent attack.”

Third, a culture must be created that promotes information security organizations to act proactively. Procedural and structural approaches to deal with day-to-day prevention need to be set in place, versus waiting to react to emergencies.

Finally, Senko suggests companies should invest in tools such as cloud-based, Big Data-driven offerings that allow for more enhanced network performance management and improved network management.

“Companies will find this preventive approach can be expensive. But they will end up dealing with the problem sooner or later. The question is: Will spending now avoid even greater spending later if they don’t take steps to protect themselves,” Senko said.

The ongoing IBIT Report series is based on rigorous, vendor-neutral academic research that provides actionable knowledge on topics relevant to industry partners. To download Senko’s full report, visit http://ibit.temple.edu/blog/2014/02/20/barbarians-inside-the-gate-dealing-with-advanced-persistent-threats/

—Alexis Wright-Whitley

Despite a 7.2 percent national unemployment rate, the job market is a healthy one for college students majoring in information systems, with nearly three quarters of students receiving at least one job offer, according to the nationwide IS Job Index by the Association for Information Systems (AIS) and Temple University’s Fox School of Business. The study compiled data from more than 1,200 students and from 48 universities across the United States.

According to the IS Job Index, released in October, 61 percent of information systems graduates received one job offer, while 23 percent received two and 9 percent received three. In 2012, there were an estimated 2.9 million jobs in the United States related to information systems.

“Information systems professionals lead IT in major corporations, but the IS labor market is ‘hidden’ because it is mixed with computer scientists and call center operators in national statistics,” said Munir Mandviwalla, associate professor and chair of the Department of Management Information Systems at the Fox School of Business and executive director of Temple’s Institute for Business and Information Technology (IBIT). “The IS Job Index is the first-ever nationwide study to focus on profiling the IT worker of the future.”

Top findings include:

▪   The IS job market is healthy, with placement levels of 74 percent overall and 78 percent upon graduation.

▪   Bachelor’s IS students have an average salary of $57,212 while master’s IS students average $65,394 a year.

▪   76 percent of IS graduates are satisfied with their jobs, and the same percentage are confident they will perform well in those jobs. Seventy-three percent found jobs related to their chosen degree.

▪   Information technology, financial services, and business services/consulting are the top industries for IS jobs.

▪   The most common job classification is systems analyst, at 35 percent for bachelor’s students and 28 percent for master’s students.

▪   Access to career services centers is the most important factor for getting a job. Also, IS students value faculty support more than central university support.

▪   IS students are 68 percent male, 55 percent white and 28 percent Asian.

The study found that students who spend more hours overall searching for a job have a higher chance of receiving an offer. When examining job-search activities, researchers found that the most successful students use multiple techniques, including looking for jobs on job boards, talking to friends and contacts, formally applying for jobs, directly contacting employers, and interviewing.

Students also apply for multiple jobs. Bachelor’s students, on average, apply for 11 jobs, and master’s students average 16 job applications.

Despite the amount of opportunity for IS students, women and minorities are still underrepresented in the field. The study shows that more than half of IS students are white men.

The AIS-Temple Fox School 2013 IS Job Index Report is a five-year ongoing project that will provide prospective and current students, guidance counselors, academics and managers with an analysis of the state of the industry.

Future reports are expected to include expanded data collection with more schools, longitudinal analysis, global focus and prioritized factors that top students seek in employers.

AIS is the world’s premier professional association for information systems. The Fox School of Business research team included Mandviwalla, Crystal M. Harold, assistant professor of human resource management and CIGNA research fellow; Paul A. Pavlou, Milton F. Stauffer professor of information technology and strategy; and Tony Petrucci, assistant professor of human resource management. For more information, including a link to the full report, visit http://ibit.temple.edu/isjobindex/

Alexis Wright-Whitley

 

Temple University alumna Judith E. Glaser, CLA ’67, has authored her seventh book, Conversational Intelligence: How Great Leaders Build Trust and Get Extraordinary Results, which translates insights from neuroscience into a practical framework for having better conversations in the workplace.

And Glaser credits Fox School of Business faculty member Angelika Dimoka, an associate professor of marketing and management information systems and the director of the Center for Neural Decision Making, for providing scientific advice that helped bring the book – releasing Oct. 1 – to fruition.

“If I didn’t meet Angelika, I wouldn’t have been able to make sense of all the things I learned because I needed the paradigm she put forth,” said Glaser, CEO of Benchmark Communications and chair of the Creating WE Institute. “There’s something so wonderful about two Temple scientists bringing their work together. It helped me deepen my work and connect the dots.”

Glaser initially contacted Dimoka in November 2010, through the urging of Zandra Harris, a member of the Creating WE Institute, and the two have been involved in a number of projects since then, including Glaser attending one of Dimoka’s annual Interdisciplinary Symposiums on Decision Neuroscience for academics and practitioners.

“I consider her a very good friend of mine,” Dimoka said of Glaser. “She’s an amazing person and very energetic. When you work with her, you get inspired.”

In Conversational Intelligence, Glaser introduces a framework of tiered conversation types in business: Level I: Transactional Conversations generally involve managers giving orders to employees. In Level II: Positional Conversations, leaders advocate their point of view by using their positional power to move people into alignment. However, Glaser argues, these two levels, while they have appropriate uses, often fall on deaf ears when they are used excessively or inappropriately – leading to compliance rather than transformation.

Glaser’s Level III: Transformational Conversations activate higher levels of trust, candor, and innovation – and ultimately strengthen organizational culture to achieve better business results.

“Bringing in the science was an amazing eye-opener for people,” Glaser said of her work with Dimoka and other academic experts who provided scientific advice. “I can’t tell you the difference it’s made.”

From noon to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12, the Temple Perspectives Webinar Series, organized by the Temple University Alumni Association, will feature Dimoka and Glaser discussing Conversations that Transform History. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/19trRvc –Brandon Lausch

Pharmaceutical companies would improve sales revenue by investing in commercial operations that promote business innovation, employee engagement, organization alignment, and ensure a reasonable ratio between district sales managers and frontline sales representatives, according to Fox School of Business research.

The study was commissioned by TGaS Advisors, a benchmarking and advisory services firm, and division of KnowledgePoint360®, a global leader in communications, information and workflow services to healthcare professionals and the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

“We focused on factors likely to impact pharmaceutical sales because data for this area are more robust, but the value of investments in sales operations should be read as a proxy for a broad range of commercial operation functions,” said George Chressanthis, the professor of healthcare management and marketing at the Fox School of Business who led the study team with Eric Eisenstein, assistant professor of marketing, and Fox PhD student Patrick Barbro.

According to Chressanthis, this is the first such independent research study on the effects of qualitative versus quantitative measures of commercial operation functions on business performance. Internally reported data from 26 pharmaceutical companies were analyzed for the period 2005-2011 and was complemented with qualitative survey data on commercial operations’ cultural attributes assessed by strategic account executives at TGaS Advisors.

The research team was given complete access to their database, with all analyses, findings, and recommendations independently developed of TGaS Advisors. All company specific data elements and names in the research were kept confidential, in keeping with contractual obligations, but did not affect the course the analysis.

The research showed that three factors within a company’s commercial operations organization are particularly important in determining U.S. business performance:

  • Commercial operations’ cultural attributes, specifically innovativeness and responsiveness, which drive employee engagement and organizational alignment, are critical. These attributes are most powerful in affecting sales when working synergistically and in concert with quantitative investments in commercial operations support.
  • Company scale and spending to support sales professionals that allow for more products to sell and leverage specialized commercial operations functional support for sales representatives to be more effective in their role.
  • The number of sales representatives whom district sales managers supervise has a direct bearing on their ability to provide necessary levels of sales force effectiveness activities such as coaching, mentoring, on-the-job training, and managerial support to representatives, which in turn has a quantifiable impact on business performance.

The findings suggest that executives can significantly improve commercial performance by investing resources to:

  • Create stronger alignment between functions and foster a culture of commercial innovation, organizational alignment, agility, and urgency. Quantitative investments in commercial operations will yield sub-optimal returns without the right structure of cultural attributes to support these business activities.
  • Support improvements in sales professionals (i.e., through information, systems, business processes, training, etc.).
  • Ensure an optimal number of sales representatives reporting to each first-line sales manager.

The Fox School research team has presented study findings at the following conferences: Pharmaceutical Management Science Association Annual Conference in May 2013 (Bonita Springs, Fla.), International Health Economics Association 9th World Congress in July 2013 (Sydney, Australia), and the American Marketing Association Summer Marketing Educators’ Conference in August 2013 (Boston).

Further insights from the study can be found by reading, “What Aspects of Commercial Operations Impact Pharmaceutical Company Business Performance?” and TGaS Advisors’ “Reflections on a Research Study Conducted by the Temple University Fox School of Business,” both available at www.tgas.com.