Newsroom

1970s

Fred Krieger, BS ’69, MBA ’76
Delivered the keynote address at the January commencement ceremony for the Fox School of Business and the School of Tourism and Hospitality Management.

1980s

Chris Fiorentino, BBA ’76, MBA ’83, PhD  ’88
Appointed interim president of West Chester University, in West Chester, Pa. He had served as the university’s vice president for external operations.

Mark S. Pollock, BBA ’83
Hired as chief financial officer of Clutch, a Philadelphia-based firm that uses transactional and behavioral data to give retails insight on customers.

James J. Dornan, BBA  ’85
Received the Musser Award for Excellence in Alumni Achievement, at the Fox School’s 19th annual Musser Awards for Excellence in Leadership reception in November.

Robert L. Nydick, PhD  ’85
Cited by Sports Illustrated for research into the greatest professional sports records of all-time, along with co-author Howard J. Weiss, a professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at the Fox School.

Carol King Barrow, MBA ’86
Named to the executive committee of the board of trustees for SAGE Eldercare, which provides information, support, and services to help individuals lead independent and active lives in a four- county region in New Jersey.

Philip P.  Jaurigue, MBA ’86
Introduced as a new member of the ownership team of the Philadelphia Soul, of the Arena Football League. Jaurigue is the president and founder of Sabre Systems Inc., of Warrington, Pa.

Mike Shannon, MBA ’87
Appointed chief executive officer of Houghton International, Inc., a global leader in metalworking fluids and services.

Kim Cross, BBA ’88
Promoted to managing director of Morgan Stanley Investment Management.

Michael S. Keim, BBA ’89
Promoted to president of Univest Bank and Trust Co., for which he also joined the board of directors.

Rahul  Merchant, ’89
Recognized as the 2015 Gallery of Success honoree of the Fox School of Business.

Eric H. Siegel, MBA ’89
Recipient of the Philadelphia Business Journal’s 2015 Corporate Counsel Award, which recognizes the top corporate attorneys in the Philadelphia region. Siegel is executive vice president and general counsel of Incyte Corporation.

1990s

Atish Banerjea, MS ’91
Appointed to the board of directors with Nelson Education Ltd., Canada’s largest educational publisher.

Sheila Hess, BBA ’91
Appointed Philadelphia City Representative by Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney.

Janesa Urbano, BBA ’92, MBA ’96, LAW ’96
Recipient of the Philadelphia Business Journal’s 2015 Corporate Counsel Award, which recognizes the top corporate attorneys in the Philadelphia region. Urbano is vice president and general counsel of Ernest Bock & Sons Inc.

Raymond K.Y. Yam, BBA ’92, MBA ’96, MS  ’98
Received the Broadcasting Board of Governors Gold Medal Award for his service with the Voice of America, an international public broadcasting service of the United States federal government.

Adam Zhu, MBA ’94
Named non-executive chair of Greater China for Bacardi and special advisor to the chief executive officer of Bacardi Limited, the world’s largest privately held spirits company.

Stephen T. Wills, MS  ’94
Appointed interim chief executive officer of Derma Sciences, a tissue regeneration company focused on advanced wound and burn care.

John Aloysius, PhD ’96
Appointed interim director of the Behavioral Business Research Lab at the University of Arkansas.

Seth Gillston, BBA ’96
Appointed as manager to a team of private equity practice underwriters within Chubb, the world’s largest publicly traded property and casualty insurance company. He also serves as Chubb’s executive vice president.

Brent Saunders, MBA ’96
Featured in Bloomberg’s Businessweek. Saunders serves as chief executive officer of Allergan Plc, the Dublin-based pharmaceutical company.

James  Schurr,  MBA  ’98
Added to the Athletic Wall of Fame at Conwell-Egan Catholic High School, in Fairless Hills, Pa., where he was a five-sport athlete.

Madan Annavarjula, PhD ’98
Appointed dean of the College of Business at Bryant College, in Smithfield, R.I.

Susan Kruml, PhD ’99
Hired as vice president of academic affairs at Midland University, in Fremont, Neb.

Louis Zecca, MBA ’99
Joined David Boland, Inc., a general contractor based in Titusville, Fla., as the company’s executive vice president, managing the firm’s extensive portfolio of projects and developing new relationships with government and commercial market clients.

Marcia Lyssy, BBA ’01, MBA ’07
Promoted to senior vice president of human resources for global logistics firm BDP International. She had served as global director of talent management.

2000s

Raza Bokhari, MBA ’01
Appointed non-executive director of Akers Biosciences, a medical device company focused on reducing the cost of healthcare through faster, easier diagnostics.

E. Albert Reece, MBA ’01
Received the David E. Rogers Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges, honoring a medical school faculty member who has made major contributions to improving the health and healthcare of the American people.

Megan E. King, MBA ’03, LAW ’03
Recipient of the Philadelphia Business Journal’s 2015 Corporate Counsel Award, which recognizes the top corporate attorneys in the Philadelphia region. King is general counsel of Brandywine Realty Trust.

Ariell Johnson, BBA ’05
Opened Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse in Philadelphia in January, becoming the first black woman-owned comic book store in the United States.

Yasmine Mustafa, BBA ’06
Shattered her crowdfunding campaign goal by more than 650 percent for her company ROAR for Good’s product Athena, a piece of wearable self- defense tech jewelry designed with one-touch technology. Also she was named to Billy Penn’s “Who’s Next” list of Philadelphia’s up-and-coming STEM leaders.

Michael P. Ginnetti, MBA ’06
Appointed interim chief financial officer, interim principal financial officer, and interim principal accounting officer of Dorman Products, a leading supplied or original equipment, dealer-exclusive replacement automotive parts. He had served as the company’s corporate controller.

Alex Mobarak, BBA ’07
Hired as controller of Cargas Solutions, a business software and consulting firm based in Lancaster, Pa.

Sylvester Mobley, BBA ’07
Named to Billy Penn’s “Who’s Next” list of Philadelphia’s up-and-coming STEM leaders for his work as executive director of Coded By Kids, an organization that provides free weekly coding education programs to children.

2010s

Angela Moemeka, MBA ’10
Featured prominently within the  Dallas  Medical  Journal,  in a story delving into children’s health and community health. Moemeka is the vice president and medical director of community health for Children’s Health System, in Dallas.

Darryl Singleton, BBA ’11
Named store manager of TD Bank’s Conshohocken, Pa., branch.

Natily Santos, MBA ’14
Spotlighted in October by Al Dia News, in a story on “The Rise of the Latino Corporate Leader in Philadelphia.” Santos is the regional procurement manager at Aramark, a Philadelphia-based foodservice, facilities, and clothing provider.

Will Cummings, BBA ’15
Selected to the NBA Development League All-Star Game. The point guard, who started with the Temple men’s basketball team, plays for the Rio Grande Valley Vipers, the D-League affiliate of the Houston Rockets.

To submit a Class Note, email your accomplishments, promotions, and achievements to khamm@temple.edu

Dr. Luo
It’s on a crowded subway train that the next big thing in mobile analytics has emerged. New research by a professor from the Fox School of Business shows an upswing in mobile purchases as consumers turn to their smartphones to disengage from the hassle of a packed train.

For the study’s coauthor, Dr. Xueming Luo, Charles Gilliland Chair Professor of Marketing, Strategic Management, and Information Systems at Fox, the results are both impactful and surprising.

“Crowded environments are oftentimes noisy and annoying,” said Luo. “We expected them to turn customers off to such purchases. That wasn’t the case.”

Luo’s study, which has been cited by the United Kingdom’s Daily Mail among other media outlets, was coauthored by Emory University’s Dr. Michelle Andrews, a Fox PhD alumna; Sichuan University’s Dr. Zheng Fang; and New York University’s Dr. Anindya Ghose.

The study partnered with a cell phone service provider that over several days sent randomly selected subway riders in a large Asian city mobile ads for digital services such as video-streaming. The study found that smartphone users trapped in densely packed trains were about two times more likely to opt to buy the promoted mobile services than those in non-crowded trains.

Though crowding is subjective, the study focused on participants with at least five or more people positioned within 10 square feet. In order to determine that crowding influenced purchasing behavior, the study examined travelers throughout the day – from rush hour business people to lull-hour, non-business casual travelers.

“It’s about being around strangers and having a fear of social awkwardness,” said Luo, and the Founder and Director of Temple University’s Global Center for Big Data in Mobile Analytics. “To avoid eye contact we reach for our phones. This happens in elevators, too. Your smartphone saves you from awkward social moments.”

Using smartphones as a coping strategy, consumers block out external social interactions and allowed marketers and advertisers to have their full attention, Luo said. And in order to maintain that attention, he said, marketers rely on creativity in cultivating consumer staying power in a market consumed by its ability to flick, click, and dismiss anything that bores them.

Understanding consumer attention spans is a part of Luo’s larger research in mobile analytics. The most effective way to engage consumers, he said, is to offer personalized incentives – from discounts to ads that appeal to a consumer’s proximity to a business. Sending out targeted geographic and temporal advertisements is well-received in instances in which consumers are annoyed by noise or crowding on their commutes.

“Cutting–edge marketing is all about delivering the right message at the right place and right moment to make an impact,” Luo said. “Smartphone technology can be leveraged to attain that, especially in a crowded subway train.”

Temple University’s Fox School of Business will honor three top technology leaders Tuesday, April 12 at its 16th annual Information Technology Awards.

This premier event is organized for Greater Philadelphia’s technology community by the nationally ranked Department of Management Information Systems (MIS) and the Institute for Business and Information Technology (IBIT). This year, Linda Dillman of QVC, Robert Moore of RJMetrics, and Rich Brennen of Spencer Stuart will receive awards.

Photo of Linda Dillman
Linda Dillman

Linda, Robert, and Rich are leading the ongoing digital revolution that is transforming the business landscape,” said Fox School of Business Dean M. Moshe Porat. “They join a proud and rich tradition of leadership exhibited by previous Fox IT Award recipients. The IT Awards, now in its 16th year, continue to recognize the best and brightest role models.”

Linda Dillman, Chief Information Officer, QVC, will receive the Fox IT Leader Award for her leadership in the use and development of IT in business. Dillman helped to develop and implement QVC’s global technology vision and strategy. Under Dillman’s leadership, QVC’s IT organization works to deliver a high-quality, seamless, multiplatform, engaging shopping experience for customers.

Dillman also serves on the board of directors for Cerner, the leading U.S. supplier of healthcare information technology solutions, and she was recently appointed to the GS1 US Board of Governors.

A seasoned leader, Dillman was recently named to the Top 10 Women in Tech list by Chain Storage Age magazine and a 2015 Top IT Pro by the Philadelphia Business Journal. She has also been recognized as a Computerworld Premier 100 IT leader for 2015 and a Most Powerful Women in Cable by CableFAX magazine in 2014 and 2015. Additionally, Dillman was named to Fortune’s “50 Most Powerful Women in Business” for five consecutive years.

Photo of Robert Moore
Robert Moore

Robert Moore, Co-founder and CEO, RJMetrics, a SaaS company that builds data infrastructure and analytics tools, will receive the Fox IT Innovator Award for his innovation in applying technology and insights to create business opportunities. Using his skills in data analysis, entrepreneurship and software development, Moore’s RJMetrics seeks to inspire and empower the data-driven community. Prior to launching RJMetrics, Moore served on the Investment Team of Insight Venture Partners in New York. As a writer and speaker, Moore has been featured by the New York Times, Forbes, TechCrunch, VentureBeat, TEDxPhilly, EnterConf, and Business of Software.

Moore supports local startups, serving on the leadership team of Philly Startup Leaders, and mentoring burgeoning Philadelphia entrepreneurs through the PSLU accelerator program.

Photo of Rich Brennen
Rich Brennen

Rich Brennen, North American CIO Practice Leader and Partner of Spencer Stuart, will receive the Fox IT Award for Distinguished Alumni for his work in the IT field and contributions to the community, industry and Temple. Brennen earned an MBA from the Fox School of Business in 1978. After graduation, he spent 15 years with IBM, where he played an instrumental role in building the company’s international information technology strategy and consulting practice. At Spencer Stuart, Brennen expanded its information officer position, leveraging his consulting talents to recruit 250 chief information officers for several Fortune 500 companies.

Brennen is currently a member of the Fox School Dean’s Council and Temple University’s Conwell Society.

Munir Mandviwalla, founding chair of the MIS department said, “The Award recipients are superb role models for our students and an inspiration to our faculty for their role in leading the new digital centric economy.”

Recipients are nominated and selected by a committee comprised of senior leadership at Fox, the Fox IT advisory board, and previous recipients.

The Fox School’s MIS department is ranked No. 1 globally in research for the period 2009-2014. US News and World Report has ranked its graduate and undergraduate programs in the Top 20 and Top 15 respectively in the nation.

The Institute for Business and Information Technology integrates industry perspectives with academic research expertise to create forums for generating and exchanging best practices.

For more information on the annual Fox IT Awards, visit http://ibit.temple.edu/itawards/

NCAC_group 2015
Temple University’s Institute for Business and Information Technology (IBIT) joined forces with Lockheed Martin in Washington D.C. in November to host the first annual National Cyber Analyst Challenge.

The competition, which welcomed 44 students and nine faculty advisors from nine universities, was designed to enhance students’ skills in combatting cyber-attacks and address a cyber talent crisis in the United States. The three-month, multi-phase competition aimed to inspire today’s technologically literate students to pursue careers in cyber security.

The result: It worked. Nearly 60 percent of the competition’s student-finalists completed online profiles with Lockheed Martin. On a 1-to-5, highest-to-lowest scale, the participants rated the competition highly on the metric of ‘learned a lot’ (1.33) and ‘value’ (1.15). One student remarked, “Hearing everyone tell us how valuable we are was a nice ego boost going into this field.”

“Cyber security analysts represent a critical skill need for most organizations,” said Chris Kearns, Lockheed Martin’s Vice President of Enterprise IT Solutions. “These students showed great promise through their hands-on teamwork to solve real world challenges and progress through the competition.”

According to SimplyHired.com, in mid-2015, there were 26,980 open cyber-security related positions. The need in these positions is less for operators and more for analysts. As threats multiply and diversify, intelligence analysis and identification is becoming critical, rather than secondary to the ability to configure or code secure servers. Yet, the job seekers in the talent pipeline find it difficult to integrate operational skills with strategic threat and cyber analysis. The goal of the National Cyber Analyst Challenge was to provide students with the opportunity to integrate specific operational skills with strategic threat analysis.

In the first phase of the competition, students pored over 75 gigabytes of data to find the cause of the simulated hack. Then the teams submitted 10-slide summary reports to explain their respective solutions for preventing future cyber-attacks. In the second phase, in which only nine teams competed, the students received training from industry experts. The competition culminated in a real-time practical challenge held at Lockheed Martin’s Global Vision Center in Crystal City, Va., in November.

A panel of industry experts, scoring finalists on technical proficiency, judgment, and communication, awarded the winning team $25,000 in prize money. Runners-up received awards of $7,500-$15,000 to support student, faculty, and curriculum development.

“It was gratifying to work with Lockheed Martin to create such a student- and faculty-centric opportunity,” said Dr. Munir Mandviwalla, IBIT’s Executive Director and the Chair of Management Information Systems at Temple’s Fox School of Business. “We hope to increase the national cyber talent pool across the nation’s top programs in Management Information Systems, Computer Science, and Engineering.”

– Lora Strum and Christopher A. Vito

Will Cummings
Will Cummings didn’t earn much playing time in his freshman season with the Temple men’s basketball team. As a sophomore, though he’d have to play behind a number of seniors, Owls coach Fran Dunphy viewed Cummings as a leader in the making.

“The summer before my sophomore year, Coach Dunphy said to me, ‘This is your time to step up,’” said Cummings, who in May graduated from the Fox School of Business. “I remember going home (to Jacksonville), working out three times a day, and watching it come together and make a difference.”

That summer, Cummings modeled a catchphrase around his newfound determination: “Self-Motivated Grind.” A capable web programmer who studied Management Information Systems at Fox, Cummings developed a website to promote his brand and create T-shirts with the slogan.

“I can’t explain why it took off so successfully,” he said. “I just Tweeted it one day and I started hearing from people who said they liked the message that it was sending.”

Cummings, who went on to earn First-Team All-American Athletic Conference honors in his senior year, is demonstrating his mettle on a different level these days. He’s suiting up for the Rio Grande Valley Vipers of the NBA Development League, the single-affiliate team of the NBA’s Houston Rockets.

Will Cummings
As he hones his skills and works toward his dream, Cummings recently shared a few minutes of his time:

Q: You played with the Rockets’ summer-league team and with the team throughout training camp. After graduating from the Fox School, did you have offers to play professionally overseas, as well?
Cummings: “I did. I had plenty of offers overseas, but the goal was to make the NBA. My family, my agent, and I know it’s a process. Houston has shown a full commitment to me, and while there are no promises, I’m just playing hard and working every day, trying make my case to play in the NBA.”

Q: There was one moment from the preseason in which you made the top plays on ESPN’s SportsCenter. That must’ve been a nice surprise, right?
Cummings: “I had a lob pass to K.J. (McDaniels) and it ended up on Temple’s Facebook page. It was great to see the support.”

Q: If you weren’t playing basketball professionally, what career path would you have chosen?
Cummings: “Well, my degree is in MIS. I’m good at programming, so I probably would’ve pursued something in that field. I had an internship my senior year with The First Tee of Greater Philadelphia. It’s a non-profit, and I worked there as an information systems intern working on their website and building it from scratch. I was there six weeks and got a lot of experience. If I ever get injured, and knock on wood that I don’t, I know that’s a career path I’d probably pursue.”

Q: You built a website of your own, too, right?
Cummings: “It’s for my brand, Self-Motivated Grind. I built the site my junior year at Temple as a motivational page to connect with young kids looking for inspiration. I have Google Analytics for the site, and it’s reached 45 countries. I have an Instagram page for it, too. People send me photos of themselves wearing my T-shirts at Temple games. I haven’t put the time in lately, because of basketball, but it’s on the backburner. It’s something my sister (Ashley) and I work on together. She and my brother (Willie) work at Lockheed Martin.”

Q: Is it safe to assume there aren’t many basketball players who have that skill set?
Cummings: “That’s probably true. I’ve heard (Miami Heat forward) Chris Bosh knows how to program, but it’s rare, yes.”

Q: Has there been a major lifestyle adjustment following graduation from Fox?
Cummings: “You don’t realize how much time you have on your hands and how hard you work in college until you graduate. I’ve adapted pretty smoothly to life after college, but without classes, study halls, or anything like that, it can be slow.”

Q: What part of your Fox School education translates to the basketball court?
Cummings: “I would say it’s the critical thinking skills I learned when I was at Fox. There are a lot of classes, including a project management class, that teach you along the way how to think critically and to help you think about a solution to the problem you’re facing. That’s a valuable skill that I can use in everyday life and as it correlates to basketball, thinking about the current moment or one play ahead. I have Fox to thank for that.”

Photo of Shawn Soto
Shawn Soto

Shawn Soto, a student from Temple University’s Fox School of Business, is the recipient of a national scholarship awarded to U.S. military veterans.

A senior, Soto was one of 30 students nationwide to earn the Harold & Muriel Berkman Charitable Foundation Award

The foundation issued $1,000 scholarships to U.S. military veterans who either hold a combat infantry badge, sustained a serious injury in combat, or served in combat for branches other than the United States Army. Students who demonstrate an enthusiasm for advancing the discipline of marketing through the pursuit of a degree in marketing or business, with an emphasis on marketing-related pursuits, are also eligible.

“It’s truly an honor to be recognized by the foundation for all of my hard work and prior military service,” said Soto, a security manager and intelligence analyst for the U.S. Army from 2009 to 2014, who served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. “This award will serve to provide further motivation for success in my studies and to continue being an active member of the veteran community.”

Soto, a Management Information Systems major, is slated to graduate in May 2016. He is a member of Temple’s chapter of the Association for Information Systems (AIS) and the Temple Veterans Association, and has made the Dean’s List at the Fox School on multiple occasions.

More than 200 students from AACSB-accredited business schools applied for the Harold & Muriel Berkman Charitable Foundation Award. The foundation, founded by Dr. Harold W. and Muriel Berkman, pursues the couple’s longstanding dedication and commitment to higher education in the United States in preparing future business leaders and promoting the growth of knowledge into effective business and administration.

Dr. Berkman served as Vice Dean and Professor of Management and Marketing at the University of Miami prior to his retirement. He also is a World War II veteran who earned his Combat Infantryman Badge in his service to the U.S. Army.

“This great country has given so much to my and Muriel’s parents who came here with nothing and built a better life for our families, and this is our way of giving back,” Dr. Berkman said in a statement.

Uber in top gear, catching up fast with its rival Ola
Will Uber unseat Ola as India’s largest taxi-booking service? Dr. Sunil Wattal, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems at Fox, weighs in.

US-based Uber in top gear, catching up fast with its rival Ola
Economic Times, India’s premier financial daily publication, tapped Dr. Sunil Wattal, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems, for a story pertaining to Ola’s bid to usurp Uber as India’s largest taxi-booking service.

In her career as a healthcare administrator, Dr. Johana Vanegas had never worked closely with designers, programmers, and artists – until the second week of November, that is.

Invited to attend the Independence/Jefferson Health Hack, a weekend event focusing on improving the access to and delivery of healthcare, Vanegas and her team delivered a winning presentation in one of the event’s three tracks. She and her teammates conceived of a six-sided device that could record the emotional states of patients and, as a result, reduce hospital readmissions.

“Patients don’t want to necessarily enter data into a smartphone app and, to be honest, not every patient has a smartphone,” said Vanegas, a student enrolled in the Part-time MBA program at Temple University’s Fox School of Business. “That’s what makes CareCube so unique.”

The Director of International Patient Access at Philadelphia’s Fox Chase Cancer Center Vanegas and her teammates designed CareCube. The device offers its user the opportunity to answer one basic question – for example, “How are you feeling?” – six different ways. Then, the patient’s responses are collected and sent to a database. The key to CareCube, Vanegas said, is that there are many applications on which it could be effective.

“It’s the type of device you might have for an elderly and otherwise healthy parent living at home, or for someone in a nursing home, or for someone who was recently discharged from the hospital,” said Vanegas, adding that while a USB cord powered the device’s prototype, future renderings of CareCube will be wireless. Vanegas said CareCube also will include voice-recording capabilities to match the tracked response with related intimation provided by the patient.

The Health Hack winnings accrued by Vanegas and her team included: $5,000 in cash; access to Microsoft BizSpark, which offers software and services for start-ups; dedicated space at the Independence Innovation Center; and memberships to NextFab, a collaborating workspace for Philadelphia innovators. Winners from each track also will share lunch with Independence Blue Cross executives Brian Lobley, Senior Vice President of Marketing and Consumer Business, and Terry Booker, Vice President of Corporate Development and Innovation.

Health Hack, held Nov. 13-15 at Philadelphia’s Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and sponsored by Independence Blue Cross, gathered 250 professionals, from artists, web developers, and engineers, to healthcare professionals, patients, and students, to brainstorm solutions to today’s greatest healthcare challenges. The event’s participants were tasked with developing solutions in one of three tracks: the reduction of readmissions, wearables, and drone-based healthcare delivery.

“It was a terrific event and I was very fortunate to have been invited to attend and participate,” said Vanegas, who was encouraged to apply for Health Hack by James Moustafellos, Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems at the Fox School, to apply the business design and innovation skills she learned in his course, Design Inquiry and Research.

Vanegas is slated to complete her Fox MBA in May 2016.

“It’s a difficult task, managing a full-time career, the pursuit of your MBA and your family,” she said, “but it’s incredibly rewarding, and it’s setting a good example for my two daughters. It says to them, ‘When you have an opportunity to do something special, you should take it.’”

AIS October 2015

The Association for Information Systems (AIS) has recognized its affiliated student chapter at Temple University’s Fox School of Business with the Distinguished Chapter Award, naming it one of the top-four student chapters in the country.

In addition to the recognition, Temple AIS will receive $250 to further its aspirations as a student organization. AIS will recognize Temple’s chapter at the 2015 International Conference on Information Systems Dec. 13-16, in Fort Worth, Texas, and again at the AIS Student Chapter Leadership Conference April 1-3, 2016, in Bloomington, Ill.

Temple AIS has repeatedly received distinction as an elite national chapter in each year of its existence. In 2013, it was designated as AIS Chapter of the Year.

“Temple AIS is not only excelling within the Temple University community, but also on a national level,” said Dr. Munir Mandviwalla, Chair of the Fox School’s Management Information Systems department. “Earning recognition as a Distinguished Chapter demonstrates the sterling reputation of Temple AIS, and I could not be more proud of their achievements, both past and present.”

The Distinguished Chapter Award highlights a chapter’s excellence in the areas of emphasis: professional development, membership, careers in information systems, community service, fundraising, and communications.

“This recognition is a testament to our national reputation, and a result of the hard work from previous officer teams,” said Temple AIS President Eric Koeck, a senior studying Management Information Systems at the Fox School. “We look forward to continuing this tradition as we work toward earning the Chapter of the Year award.”

The award recognizes the “best of the best” from 70 different chapters across the country. Temple’s chapter joins those from the University of Alabama and the University of Montana as chapters that are improving the professional networks of students engaged in the Information Systems degree program, the association said in a statement.

“AIS takes immense pride in recognizing the distinguished scholars who make up our community, and ultimately, contribute to the success of the field,” said AIS Vice President of Student Chapters James Parrish.

Founded in 1994 as a professional organization, AIS first launched student chapters in 2008. Each year, the association awards one chapter the honor of Chapter of the Year, and three others as Distinguished Chapters.

Uber fast emerging the winner against Ola in the cab aggregator biz in India
Will Uber unseat Ola as India’s largest taxi-booking service? The companies have different focuses, says Dr. Sunil Wattal, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems at Fox, who makes a case for both having a place in the Indian ride-sharing marketplace.

With Uber or Lyft doing the driving, restaurateurs say more customers opt for that extra drink
Research by Management Information Systems Associate Professor Dr. Sunil Wattal and Assistant Professor Dr. Brad Greenwood into the potentiality of ride-sharing service UberX reducing the rates of drunken-driving related deaths has been featured in Atlanta’s top daily newspaper. The researchers also were quoted in the Oct. 2 edition of the Los Angeles Times.

Justin Rosenberg
Justin Rosenberg

Justin Rosenberg’s business plan started at Fox, and recently earned $25 million in investment funding

Justin Rosenberg

MBA ‘09 | Founder and Partner, honeygrow

Hometown: Melville, N.Y.

Adopted home: “Philadelphia is often overlooked by other companies and concepts. I’m a Long Islander, but to me, I can’t imagine doing business anywhere other than Philly.”

When writing his business plan, Justin Rosenberg was meticulous, gathering more information than he’d ever use—or need.

The native New Yorker remembers spending hours at the Fox School of Business, curling up in Alter Hall’s lounge chairs while developing the business model for what would become honeygrow, the Philadelphia-based, fast-casual restaurant that offers fresh-to- order salads and stir-fries with seasonal, local ingredients.

In June, honeygrow received $25 million in investment funding from Miller Investment Management, which will support further expansion of honeygrow and updates to the company’s technology platform.

“It seems like I was just in Alter yesterday,” said Rosenberg, MBA ’09. “Building honeygrow was one of the most challenging things I’ve ever done, but it was worth it.”

The Fox School alumnus worked as a financial analyst and asset manager while pursuing his Global MBA. Deep down, he said, he desired to build a company of his own. Rosenberg was a vegan at the time and sought more creative, locally grown meal options than most restaurants offered. So he crafted a restaurant concept to his liking.

He found information about touch-screen ordering systems by calling companies that utilized them. He even contacted restaurant owners from as far away as California, to inquire about the size of their bowls and to best determine price-per-ounce figures.

Then, he took to the streets. Rosenberg wasn’t above knocking on doors to find investors, or working the weekend. Following 40-or-more-hour workweeks, Rosenberg would ride a bus to Washington, D.C., where he’d work in the kitchen of a friend’s restaurant. He navigated Saturday night dinners and the Sunday brunch rush, before heading home to his wife, Halie, who at the time was pregnant with the first of their three children.

In June 2012, he opened honeygrow’s first location—at 16th and Sansom streets in Philadelphia. In three short years, Rosenberg and honeygrow continue to blossom and will have expanded to eight locations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, and 20 corporate employees by the end of 2015.

“It’s a sacrifice. Every step was a humbling experience, but it was how I learned that, for a company to be successful, you have to embrace it and make it your life, and obsess over the details,” Rosenberg said. “There’s this mirage that, if you’re your own boss, life is great. It can be, but only if you work hard and continue to remain focused.”

Engaging high school students to spur urban civic start-ups and community involvement

Photo of Dr. Youngjin Yoo (center) with students from Temple University’s Urban Apps & Maps Studios
Dr. Youngjin Yoo (center) with students from Temple University’s Urban Apps & Maps Studios

Two Philadelphia high school students temporarily put their summer plans on hold for a unique afternoon activity: The students, from Temple University’s Urban Apps & Maps Studios, delivered a technology prototype presentation to a leading executive from Samsung.

Sharing conference-room space with Young-jun Kim, Senior Vice President of Design of Samsung Electronics and President of Samsung’s Art and Design Institute, the students unveiled Samsung Self, a platform they developed to incentivize youth to have an active lifestyle and reduce the health risks associated with obesity. A user’s every movement is tracked, including staircase climbing, walking, watching movies in front of a TV, and listening to music. Self connects various aspects of a busy youth’s life that can affect their health through digital rewards that could be applied to music downloads, for example.

“We see our area’s high school students as cultural researchers who are experts in tomorrow’s high-tech culture,” said Dr. Youngjin Yoo, Harry A. Cochran Professor of Management Information Systems at the Fox School of Business, and founder of Temple’s Apps & Maps Studios.

The Samsung presentation serves as just one example of the impact forged by Urban Apps & Maps Studios, a Temple university-wide, interdisciplinary program. Each year, Apps & Maps connects Philadelphia high school students with Temple faculty and graduate student mentors to encourage, develop, and found start-ups to transform urban challenges into products and services. To date, thousands of students, hundreds of mentors and dozens of faculty have contributed to the Apps & Maps Building Information Technology Skills (BITS) six-week summer program, according to Dr. Michele Masucci, BITS Director and Temple University Vice President for Research Administration.

“Before Apps & Maps was founded, I had come to the conclusion that we’d need to create an urban entrepreneurship movement, so young men and women can use the technology around them to create solutions, make a difference, and aspire to become lifestyle entrepreneurs,” Yoo said. “Apps & Maps supports that movement.”

Apps & Maps received initial funding from the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration, in the form of a $500,000, five-year grant in 2011. The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation also funds the Apps & Maps Studios program to bridge students and faculty members across Temple University. Over the last three years alone, Apps & Maps has trained more than 450 local high school students and over 150 Temple students who worked with faculty members from Temple’s College of Engineering, Katz School of Medicine, and the Fox School, in conjunction with the departments of English, Computer and Information Science, Biology, and Geography and Urban Studies.

Photo of Apps and Maps StudentsIn this year’s BITS program, the high school students’ projects included: analyzing the impacts of and suggesting improvements for a proposed, elevated rail park in Philadelphia’s post-industrial neighborhoods; mobile apps, to connect food-truck vendors with consumers for more-efficient transactions, and to address urban littering; and mapping the customer experience of Pennsylvania Ballet attendees.

Over the summer, Cameron Javon Scott and his 11 teammates visited Comcast and met with Android Studio developers. Armed with knowledge and confidence, the team, under the supervision of Dr. Karl Morris, Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Temple’s College of Science and Technology, developed the prototype for a mobile application called Foodocracy, which would bridge the gap between food-truck owners and consumers.

“Before I did this, I had no coding experience,” said Scott, a 15-year-old sophomore from Harriton High School in Bryn Mawr, Pa. “I joined this program and I knew what I might want to do for a career, but didn’t know how to get there. This program gave me knowledge and direction. I’m here because they saw my potential.”

Jamik Ligon lined up five summer programs in which to participate, including a video-game design program at his school, Philadelphia’s Simon Gratz High School, and a biomedical engineering program in Drexel University’s nanoscience department.

“I was willing to drop all of that for Apps & Maps,” said Ligon, an 18-year-old senior. “That’s what this (program) means to me.”

John AloysiusDr. John Aloysius, who earned his doctoral degree from Temple University’s Fox School of Business, has been appointed the director of a major business research lab at the University of Arkansas.

John Aloysius, PhD ’96, was named interim director of the Sam M. Walton College of Business’ Behavioral Business Research Lab at University of Arkansas. He will hold this position for the remainder of the 2015-16 academic year, while colleague Cary Deck serves a one-year visiting professorship.

Arkansas’ Behavioral Business Research Lab is a unique, multi-user facility for economics, marketing, information systems and supply chain faculty, said Aloysius, who earned his Fox PhD in Operations Management. The center is an interdisciplinary resource geared toward the study of human behavior and decision making. It features state-of-the-art computer equipment that will assist in marketing- and retail-based experiments.

Aloysius, an associate professor of supply chain management at Arkansas, said he conducts a majority of his research within the lab. He examines how consumers use mobile technology in a retail context, looking into the use of coupons, product reviews and promotional activities in influencing shoppers. This research has been published in Management Information Systems Quarterly.

“If you entice them at the precise moment, consumers can go from being a browser to being a buyer,” Aloysius said.

Aloysius’ other research pursuits delve into privacy and security issues for shoppers and inventory management.

“Managers stand in front of monitors that have information about how much inventory there is and the distribution of demand,” he said. “They are trying to figure out what a company would need to order to put product on the shelf.”

Dr. Edward C. Rosenthal, Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at the Fox School, served as Aloysius’ dissertation chair while he pursued his Fox PhD. Rosenthal said he encouraged Aloysius to conduct his research independently. In his dissertation, Aloysius applied game theory to cost-sharing problems in the telecommunications industry, which evolved into an interest in decision making and how people apply technology in the retail industry.

“He was a bright student who was motivated and great to work alongside,” Rosenthal said. “I think that John’s assuming of the directorship of the Behavioral Business Research Lab at the University of Arkansas had its origins while he was a graduate student here at Fox all of those years ago. “

Aloysius said he hopes to widen the lab’s horizons by working with external local firms and incorporating new technology.

“What is happening in retail blurs the line between physical stores and online shopping, and in the lab as well,” he said. “It is a natural extension.”

Aloysius plans to reconnect with his Fox School colleagues while visiting Philadelphia in November for the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science conference (INFORMS). He said he plans to meet with Rosenthal and current research colleague Dr. Misty Blessley, an Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at Fox.

Aloysius and Blessley are collaborating on experimental research into switching behavior under various conditions of psychological contact breach. The experiment will move into the data-collection phase in November. “What I like about John is he challenges you to look over your research meticulously,” Blessley said.

“At Arkansas, John has become more deeply involved with the behavioral aspects of supply chain management research and leading their behavioral business research lab is a natural next step,” Rosenthal said.