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Photo of Shawn Soto
Shawn Soto

Shawn Soto, a student from Temple University’s Fox School of Business, is the recipient of a national scholarship awarded to U.S. military veterans.

A senior, Soto was one of 30 students nationwide to earn the Harold & Muriel Berkman Charitable Foundation Award

The foundation issued $1,000 scholarships to U.S. military veterans who either hold a combat infantry badge, sustained a serious injury in combat, or served in combat for branches other than the United States Army. Students who demonstrate an enthusiasm for advancing the discipline of marketing through the pursuit of a degree in marketing or business, with an emphasis on marketing-related pursuits, are also eligible.

“It’s truly an honor to be recognized by the foundation for all of my hard work and prior military service,” said Soto, a security manager and intelligence analyst for the U.S. Army from 2009 to 2014, who served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. “This award will serve to provide further motivation for success in my studies and to continue being an active member of the veteran community.”

Soto, a Management Information Systems major, is slated to graduate in May 2016. He is a member of Temple’s chapter of the Association for Information Systems (AIS) and the Temple Veterans Association, and has made the Dean’s List at the Fox School on multiple occasions.

More than 200 students from AACSB-accredited business schools applied for the Harold & Muriel Berkman Charitable Foundation Award. The foundation, founded by Dr. Harold W. and Muriel Berkman, pursues the couple’s longstanding dedication and commitment to higher education in the United States in preparing future business leaders and promoting the growth of knowledge into effective business and administration.

Dr. Berkman served as Vice Dean and Professor of Management and Marketing at the University of Miami prior to his retirement. He also is a World War II veteran who earned his Combat Infantryman Badge in his service to the U.S. Army.

“This great country has given so much to my and Muriel’s parents who came here with nothing and built a better life for our families, and this is our way of giving back,” Dr. Berkman said in a statement.

Uber in top gear, catching up fast with its rival Ola
Will Uber unseat Ola as India’s largest taxi-booking service? Dr. Sunil Wattal, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems at Fox, weighs in.

Sunil Wattal | November 3, 2015| Economic Times

November 30, 2015 //

US-based Uber in top gear, catching up fast with its rival Ola
Economic Times, India’s premier financial daily publication, tapped Dr. Sunil Wattal, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems, for a story pertaining to Ola’s bid to usurp Uber as India’s largest taxi-booking service.

In her career as a healthcare administrator, Dr. Johana Vanegas had never worked closely with designers, programmers, and artists – until the second week of November, that is.

Invited to attend the Independence/Jefferson Health Hack, a weekend event focusing on improving the access to and delivery of healthcare, Vanegas and her team delivered a winning presentation in one of the event’s three tracks. She and her teammates conceived of a six-sided device that could record the emotional states of patients and, as a result, reduce hospital readmissions.

“Patients don’t want to necessarily enter data into a smartphone app and, to be honest, not every patient has a smartphone,” said Vanegas, a student enrolled in the Part-time MBA program at Temple University’s Fox School of Business. “That’s what makes CareCube so unique.”

The Director of International Patient Access at Philadelphia’s Fox Chase Cancer Center Vanegas and her teammates designed CareCube. The device offers its user the opportunity to answer one basic question – for example, “How are you feeling?” – six different ways. Then, the patient’s responses are collected and sent to a database. The key to CareCube, Vanegas said, is that there are many applications on which it could be effective.

“It’s the type of device you might have for an elderly and otherwise healthy parent living at home, or for someone in a nursing home, or for someone who was recently discharged from the hospital,” said Vanegas, adding that while a USB cord powered the device’s prototype, future renderings of CareCube will be wireless. Vanegas said CareCube also will include voice-recording capabilities to match the tracked response with related intimation provided by the patient.

The Health Hack winnings accrued by Vanegas and her team included: $5,000 in cash; access to Microsoft BizSpark, which offers software and services for start-ups; dedicated space at the Independence Innovation Center; and memberships to NextFab, a collaborating workspace for Philadelphia innovators. Winners from each track also will share lunch with Independence Blue Cross executives Brian Lobley, Senior Vice President of Marketing and Consumer Business, and Terry Booker, Vice President of Corporate Development and Innovation.

Health Hack, held Nov. 13-15 at Philadelphia’s Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and sponsored by Independence Blue Cross, gathered 250 professionals, from artists, web developers, and engineers, to healthcare professionals, patients, and students, to brainstorm solutions to today’s greatest healthcare challenges. The event’s participants were tasked with developing solutions in one of three tracks: the reduction of readmissions, wearables, and drone-based healthcare delivery.

“It was a terrific event and I was very fortunate to have been invited to attend and participate,” said Vanegas, who was encouraged to apply for Health Hack by James Moustafellos, Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems at the Fox School, to apply the business design and innovation skills she learned in his course, Design Inquiry and Research.

Vanegas is slated to complete her Fox MBA in May 2016.

“It’s a difficult task, managing a full-time career, the pursuit of your MBA and your family,” she said, “but it’s incredibly rewarding, and it’s setting a good example for my two daughters. It says to them, ‘When you have an opportunity to do something special, you should take it.’”

AIS October 2015

The Association for Information Systems (AIS) has recognized its affiliated student chapter at Temple University’s Fox School of Business with the Distinguished Chapter Award, naming it one of the top-four student chapters in the country.

In addition to the recognition, Temple AIS will receive $250 to further its aspirations as a student organization. AIS will recognize Temple’s chapter at the 2015 International Conference on Information Systems Dec. 13-16, in Fort Worth, Texas, and again at the AIS Student Chapter Leadership Conference April 1-3, 2016, in Bloomington, Ill.

Temple AIS has repeatedly received distinction as an elite national chapter in each year of its existence. In 2013, it was designated as AIS Chapter of the Year.

“Temple AIS is not only excelling within the Temple University community, but also on a national level,” said Dr. Munir Mandviwalla, Chair of the Fox School’s Management Information Systems department. “Earning recognition as a Distinguished Chapter demonstrates the sterling reputation of Temple AIS, and I could not be more proud of their achievements, both past and present.”

The Distinguished Chapter Award highlights a chapter’s excellence in the areas of emphasis: professional development, membership, careers in information systems, community service, fundraising, and communications.

“This recognition is a testament to our national reputation, and a result of the hard work from previous officer teams,” said Temple AIS President Eric Koeck, a senior studying Management Information Systems at the Fox School. “We look forward to continuing this tradition as we work toward earning the Chapter of the Year award.”

The award recognizes the “best of the best” from 70 different chapters across the country. Temple’s chapter joins those from the University of Alabama and the University of Montana as chapters that are improving the professional networks of students engaged in the Information Systems degree program, the association said in a statement.

“AIS takes immense pride in recognizing the distinguished scholars who make up our community, and ultimately, contribute to the success of the field,” said AIS Vice President of Student Chapters James Parrish.

Founded in 1994 as a professional organization, AIS first launched student chapters in 2008. Each year, the association awards one chapter the honor of Chapter of the Year, and three others as Distinguished Chapters.

Uber fast emerging the winner against Ola in the cab aggregator biz in India
Will Uber unseat Ola as India’s largest taxi-booking service? The companies have different focuses, says Dr. Sunil Wattal, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems at Fox, who makes a case for both having a place in the Indian ride-sharing marketplace.

With Uber or Lyft doing the driving, restaurateurs say more customers opt for that extra drink
Research by Management Information Systems Associate Professor Dr. Sunil Wattal and Assistant Professor Dr. Brad Greenwood into the potentiality of ride-sharing service UberX reducing the rates of drunken-driving related deaths has been featured in Atlanta’s top daily newspaper. The researchers also were quoted in the Oct. 2 edition of the Los Angeles Times.

Justin Rosenberg
Justin Rosenberg

Justin Rosenberg’s business plan started at Fox, and recently earned $25 million in investment funding

Justin Rosenberg

MBA ‘09 | Founder and Partner, honeygrow

Hometown: Melville, N.Y.

Adopted home: “Philadelphia is often overlooked by other companies and concepts. I’m a Long Islander, but to me, I can’t imagine doing business anywhere other than Philly.”

When writing his business plan, Justin Rosenberg was meticulous, gathering more information than he’d ever use—or need.

The native New Yorker remembers spending hours at the Fox School of Business, curling up in Alter Hall’s lounge chairs while developing the business model for what would become honeygrow, the Philadelphia-based, fast-casual restaurant that offers fresh-to- order salads and stir-fries with seasonal, local ingredients.

In June, honeygrow received $25 million in investment funding from Miller Investment Management, which will support further expansion of honeygrow and updates to the company’s technology platform.

“It seems like I was just in Alter yesterday,” said Rosenberg, MBA ’09. “Building honeygrow was one of the most challenging things I’ve ever done, but it was worth it.”

The Fox School alumnus worked as a financial analyst and asset manager while pursuing his Global MBA. Deep down, he said, he desired to build a company of his own. Rosenberg was a vegan at the time and sought more creative, locally grown meal options than most restaurants offered. So he crafted a restaurant concept to his liking.

He found information about touch-screen ordering systems by calling companies that utilized them. He even contacted restaurant owners from as far away as California, to inquire about the size of their bowls and to best determine price-per-ounce figures.

Then, he took to the streets. Rosenberg wasn’t above knocking on doors to find investors, or working the weekend. Following 40-or-more-hour workweeks, Rosenberg would ride a bus to Washington, D.C., where he’d work in the kitchen of a friend’s restaurant. He navigated Saturday night dinners and the Sunday brunch rush, before heading home to his wife, Halie, who at the time was pregnant with the first of their three children.

In June 2012, he opened honeygrow’s first location—at 16th and Sansom streets in Philadelphia. In three short years, Rosenberg and honeygrow continue to blossom and will have expanded to eight locations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, and 20 corporate employees by the end of 2015.

“It’s a sacrifice. Every step was a humbling experience, but it was how I learned that, for a company to be successful, you have to embrace it and make it your life, and obsess over the details,” Rosenberg said. “There’s this mirage that, if you’re your own boss, life is great. It can be, but only if you work hard and continue to remain focused.”

Urban Apps & Maps Studio

November 3, 2015 //

Engaging high school students to spur urban civic start-ups and community involvement

Photo of Dr. Youngjin Yoo (center) with students from Temple University’s Urban Apps & Maps Studios
Dr. Youngjin Yoo (center) with students from Temple University’s Urban Apps & Maps Studios

Two Philadelphia high school students temporarily put their summer plans on hold for a unique afternoon activity: The students, from Temple University’s Urban Apps & Maps Studios, delivered a technology prototype presentation to a leading executive from Samsung.

Sharing conference-room space with Young-jun Kim, Senior Vice President of Design of Samsung Electronics and President of Samsung’s Art and Design Institute, the students unveiled Samsung Self, a platform they developed to incentivize youth to have an active lifestyle and reduce the health risks associated with obesity. A user’s every movement is tracked, including staircase climbing, walking, watching movies in front of a TV, and listening to music. Self connects various aspects of a busy youth’s life that can affect their health through digital rewards that could be applied to music downloads, for example.

“We see our area’s high school students as cultural researchers who are experts in tomorrow’s high-tech culture,” said Dr. Youngjin Yoo, Harry A. Cochran Professor of Management Information Systems at the Fox School of Business, and founder of Temple’s Apps & Maps Studios.

The Samsung presentation serves as just one example of the impact forged by Urban Apps & Maps Studios, a Temple university-wide, interdisciplinary program. Each year, Apps & Maps connects Philadelphia high school students with Temple faculty and graduate student mentors to encourage, develop, and found start-ups to transform urban challenges into products and services. To date, thousands of students, hundreds of mentors and dozens of faculty have contributed to the Apps & Maps Building Information Technology Skills (BITS) six-week summer program, according to Dr. Michele Masucci, BITS Director and Temple University Vice President for Research Administration.

“Before Apps & Maps was founded, I had come to the conclusion that we’d need to create an urban entrepreneurship movement, so young men and women can use the technology around them to create solutions, make a difference, and aspire to become lifestyle entrepreneurs,” Yoo said. “Apps & Maps supports that movement.”

Apps & Maps received initial funding from the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration, in the form of a $500,000, five-year grant in 2011. The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation also funds the Apps & Maps Studios program to bridge students and faculty members across Temple University. Over the last three years alone, Apps & Maps has trained more than 450 local high school students and over 150 Temple students who worked with faculty members from Temple’s College of Engineering, Katz School of Medicine, and the Fox School, in conjunction with the departments of English, Computer and Information Science, Biology, and Geography and Urban Studies.

Photo of Apps and Maps StudentsIn this year’s BITS program, the high school students’ projects included: analyzing the impacts of and suggesting improvements for a proposed, elevated rail park in Philadelphia’s post-industrial neighborhoods; mobile apps, to connect food-truck vendors with consumers for more-efficient transactions, and to address urban littering; and mapping the customer experience of Pennsylvania Ballet attendees.

Over the summer, Cameron Javon Scott and his 11 teammates visited Comcast and met with Android Studio developers. Armed with knowledge and confidence, the team, under the supervision of Dr. Karl Morris, Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Temple’s College of Science and Technology, developed the prototype for a mobile application called Foodocracy, which would bridge the gap between food-truck owners and consumers.

“Before I did this, I had no coding experience,” said Scott, a 15-year-old sophomore from Harriton High School in Bryn Mawr, Pa. “I joined this program and I knew what I might want to do for a career, but didn’t know how to get there. This program gave me knowledge and direction. I’m here because they saw my potential.”

Jamik Ligon lined up five summer programs in which to participate, including a video-game design program at his school, Philadelphia’s Simon Gratz High School, and a biomedical engineering program in Drexel University’s nanoscience department.

“I was willing to drop all of that for Apps & Maps,” said Ligon, an 18-year-old senior. “That’s what this (program) means to me.”

John AloysiusDr. John Aloysius, who earned his doctoral degree from Temple University’s Fox School of Business, has been appointed the director of a major business research lab at the University of Arkansas.

John Aloysius, PhD ’96, was named interim director of the Sam M. Walton College of Business’ Behavioral Business Research Lab at University of Arkansas. He will hold this position for the remainder of the 2015-16 academic year, while colleague Cary Deck serves a one-year visiting professorship.

Arkansas’ Behavioral Business Research Lab is a unique, multi-user facility for economics, marketing, information systems and supply chain faculty, said Aloysius, who earned his Fox PhD in Operations Management. The center is an interdisciplinary resource geared toward the study of human behavior and decision making. It features state-of-the-art computer equipment that will assist in marketing- and retail-based experiments.

Aloysius, an associate professor of supply chain management at Arkansas, said he conducts a majority of his research within the lab. He examines how consumers use mobile technology in a retail context, looking into the use of coupons, product reviews and promotional activities in influencing shoppers. This research has been published in Management Information Systems Quarterly.

“If you entice them at the precise moment, consumers can go from being a browser to being a buyer,” Aloysius said.

Aloysius’ other research pursuits delve into privacy and security issues for shoppers and inventory management.

“Managers stand in front of monitors that have information about how much inventory there is and the distribution of demand,” he said. “They are trying to figure out what a company would need to order to put product on the shelf.”

Dr. Edward C. Rosenthal, Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at the Fox School, served as Aloysius’ dissertation chair while he pursued his Fox PhD. Rosenthal said he encouraged Aloysius to conduct his research independently. In his dissertation, Aloysius applied game theory to cost-sharing problems in the telecommunications industry, which evolved into an interest in decision making and how people apply technology in the retail industry.

“He was a bright student who was motivated and great to work alongside,” Rosenthal said. “I think that John’s assuming of the directorship of the Behavioral Business Research Lab at the University of Arkansas had its origins while he was a graduate student here at Fox all of those years ago. “

Aloysius said he hopes to widen the lab’s horizons by working with external local firms and incorporating new technology.

“What is happening in retail blurs the line between physical stores and online shopping, and in the lab as well,” he said. “It is a natural extension.”

Aloysius plans to reconnect with his Fox School colleagues while visiting Philadelphia in November for the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science conference (INFORMS). He said he plans to meet with Rosenthal and current research colleague Dr. Misty Blessley, an Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at Fox.

Aloysius and Blessley are collaborating on experimental research into switching behavior under various conditions of psychological contact breach. The experiment will move into the data-collection phase in November. “What I like about John is he challenges you to look over your research meticulously,” Blessley said.

“At Arkansas, John has become more deeply involved with the behavioral aspects of supply chain management research and leading their behavioral business research lab is a natural next step,” Rosenthal said.

Temple Magazine, Fall 2015 Edition
Fox School faculty are highlighted in the latest edition of Temple University’s alumni magazine: Research by Dr. Maureen “Mimi” Morrin, Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, into the affects of fragrance on consumers’ purchasing habits appears on page 8; Dr. Youngjin Yoo, the Harry A. Cochran Professor of Management Information Systems, and the Apps & Maps Studios appear on page 26; and Fox School rankings appear on page 5.

A Villanova inventor learns the ways of crowd-funding
With more projects competing for attention and money, crowdfunding isn’t as easy as it once used to be, says Dr. Sunil Wattal, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems at Fox, in a recent Philadelphia Inquirer article. Wattal is also featured in a piece that accompanied the article, detailing the requirements of a successful crowdfunding campaign.

Photo of Karan Patel
Karan Patel

Dressed in a dark suit, Karan Patel walked through Mitten Hall shaking hands and charming recruiters at the sixth-annual Fall Connection, a networking event organized by the Fox School of Business’ Center for Student Professional Development (CSPD). He hardly resembled the student who had arrived to February’s CSPD Spring Connection in shirtsleeves and offered a limp handshake.

A junior Marketing major and Management Information Systems minor, Patel no longer considers himself that type of person.

“I wasn’t prepared,” Patel said of the springtime event. “I didn’t impress recruiters, but I learned from my mistakes. The CSPD helped me with that.”

Fall Connection is one of the CSPD’s biannual networking events, the second of which is held during the spring semester. This year’s four-hour event nearly filled Temple University’s Mitten Hall to capacity, matching 89 employers with more than 800 students from the Fox School.

For Fox Assistant Dean for Student Development Corinne Snell, Fall Connection is the CSPD’s signature event and serves as a great kick-off for October’s corporate recruiting season.

“It’s a time to make a positive impression and for students to put in face-time with the recruiters,” Snell said. “Recruiters contact us directly because of the professionalism and polish our students portray.”

Students from the Fox School of Business engaged employers at the Center for Student Professional Development’s Fall Connection networking event, held Sept. 16 at Temple University’s Mitten Hall. Ryan S. Brandenburg/Temple University Photography
Students from the Fox School of Business engaged employers at the Center for Student Professional Development’s Fall Connection networking event, held Sept. 16 at Temple University’s Mitten Hall. Ryan S. Brandenburg/Temple University Photography

This year, Patel considered himself one of those students.

Since his first showing at CSPD’s Spring Connection, he’s completed two successful summer internships with Business Route and Fastenal, continued to build his personal photography service, and joined customer service at World Republic Bank in Haddonfield, N.J.

“I go to bed at 1 a.m. and wake up at 6. I’m running 14-hour days because that’s what it takes,” Patel explained.

Patel is competing for the attention of top-tier employers such as Deloitte, Pepsi, Comcast Corporation, Target, PNC, JP Morgan Chase, Crayola, Independence Blue Cross, and others. With his eyes set on forging corporate friendships, Patel turned to the CSPD to transform his professional persona.

“I tried figuring stuff out on my own, but I had to ask questions. I’ve realized how beneficial the CSPD is to landing a job,” Patel said.

Located at the Fox School of Business, CSPD hosts one-hour workshops to help students prepare for its large-scale networking events. The workshops introduce students to the resources the CSPD office has to offer, including advice on professional attire, resume writing, and mock interviews. Giving students what they call the “CSPD Difference,” staff members work with students on developing a professional edge in the weeks leading up to their corporate connection events.

Ryan S. Brandenburg/Temple University Photography
Ryan S. Brandenburg/Temple University Photography

“We always hear from employers that we’re setting the bar,” said Megan Panaccio, CSPD Director of Corporate Relations. “The employers look forward to our event.”

The strength of its corporate partnerships and its dedication to student development drew Patel, a transfer student, to the Fox School. With his roots in Gujarat, India, Patel said he admires the work ethic his mother and father have demonstrated while working as a Dunkin’ Donuts manager and a convenience store owner, respectively. He considers his efforts through CSPD and Fall Connection stepping-stones to a promising future.

“My mom wakes at 5 a.m. to make lunches for the family,” he said. “She has had to work very hard. My future success is a way to pay her back as much as I can.”

Challenge prompts importance of cyber-security
Dr. Munir Mandviwalla, Chair of Fox’s Management Information Systems department and Executive Director of Temple’s Institute for Business and Information Technology, and Laurel Miller, Director of IBIT, spoke with the student newspaper about IBIT’s partnership with Lockheed Martin for the first National Cyber Analyst Challenge.

Study suggests Uber reduces DWI deaths
Management Information Systems professor Dr. Sunil Wattal appeared on an evening news broadcast, via Skype, to discuss his latest research (co-authored by Dr. Brad Greenwood) into the potentiality of ride-sharing service UberX contributing to reduced rates of drunken-driving related deaths. Their research also was featured in the Sept. 8 edition of student newspaper, The Temple News.