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As workers celebrate Labor Day, unions struggle to survive (subscription only)
As the country recently celebrated Labor Day, the Bucks County Courier-Times reflected on the nation’s drop in unionized labor workers, from 38 percent post-World War II to 11 percent today. Associate Professor of Human Resource Management Dr. John McClendon, who counts union labor among his research specialties, is quoted throughout the story – which appeared on the cover of the paper’s Sunday edition. Download PDF Cover and page 2.

When an MD is not enough, add an MBA
Nationwide, the ever-changing landscape of healthcare has led physicians to business schools for MBAs. WHYY made Fox Online MBA student Alexander Vaccaro, the president of the Rothman Institute, the focus of its story on this topic. The reporter spoke with Dr. William Aaronson, Fox’s Associate Dean for Graduate Programs, and snapped a photo that’s included in the story during a visit to a class directed by Dr. John McClendon, Associate Professor of Human Resource Management.

Union membership has dropped steeply since the 1980s because of forces such as globalization, new technology and the shift from a manufacturing to a service economy. Now public-sector unions are under attack, too, and the future of organized labor hangs in the balance. John McClendon, associate professor of human resource management at Temple’s Fox School of Business, says as unions have declined, the middle class in general has lost ground. “As we see middle-class wages stagnating over the last generation, one of the arguments is that they lack bargaining power,” he said.

http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2011/03/31/part-4-will-labor-unions-survive/

March 31, 2011

Union membership has dropped steeply since the 1980s because of forces such as globalization, new technology and the shift from a manufacturing to a service economy. Now public-sector unions are under attack, too, and the future of organized labor hangs in the balance. John McClendon, associate professor of human resource management at Temple’s Fox School of Business, says as unions have declined, the middle class in general has lost ground. “As we see middle-class wages stagnating over the last generation, one of the arguments is that they lack bargaining power,” he said.

Continue to KYW Newsradio 1060 to read more…

About 1,000 members and supporters of Pennsylvania labor unions rallied in Center City on Thursday to support Wisconsin’s embattled public workers. Their message: Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to strip collective bargaining rights from nearly all public employees is part of a deliberate attempt to destroy the middle class. John McClendon, an associate professor at the Fox School of Business who studies labor relations, says Walker’s proposal is unprecedented. “We’ve never seen anything quite like this in terms of an effort to roll back those collective-bargaining rights,” he said. “The implications for this could be very meaningful for other states, Indiana, Ohio and who knows where else.”

http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?section=news/local&id=7977257

Feb. 24, 2011

About 1,000 members and supporters of Pennsylvania labor unions rallied in Center City on Thursday to support Wisconsin’s embattled public workers. Their message: Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to strip collective bargaining rights from nearly all public employees is a deliberate attempt to destroy the middle class. John McClendon, an associate professor at the Fox School of Business who studies labor relations, says Walker’s proposal is unprecedented. “We’ve never seen anything quite like this in terms of an effort to roll back those collective-bargaining rights,” he said. “The implications for this could be very meaningful for other states, Indiana, Ohio and who knows where else.”

Continue to 6ABC to read more…

Feb. 24, 2011

About 1,000 members and supporters of Pennsylvania labor unions rallied in Center City on Thursday to support Wisconsin’s embattled public workers. Their message: Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to strip collective bargaining rights from nearly all public employees is a deliberate attempt to destroy the middle class. John McClendon, an associate professor at the Fox School of Business who studies labor relations, says Walker’s proposal is unprecedented. “We’ve never seen anything quite like this in terms of an effort to roll back those collective-bargaining rights,” he said. “The implications for this could be very meaningful for other states, Indiana, Ohio and who knows where else.”

Continue to 6ABC to read more…

Feb. 24, 2011

About 1,000 members and supporters of Pennsylvania labor unions rallied in Center City on Thursday to support Wisconsin’s embattled public workers. Their message: Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to strip collective bargaining rights from nearly all public employees is a deliberate attempt to destroy the middle class. John McClendon, an associate professor at the Fox School of Business who studies labor relations, says Walker’s proposal is unprecedented. “We’ve never seen anything quite like this in terms of an effort to roll back those collective-bargaining rights,” he said. “The implications for this could be very meaningful for other states, Indiana, Ohio and who knows where else.”

Continue to 6ABC to read more…

There were 793 major strikes in the U.S. in 1969 and 1970. Forty years later, there were only 16. John McClendon, an associate professor at the Fox School of Business, says less than 10 percent of the private-sector workforce is unionized, compared to 35 percent in the late 1950s. “If you look at the declining strike rate, that’s perfectly consistent with declining union membership itself,” he said.

Fox 29

February 9, 2011 //

Feb. 9, 2011

There were 793 major strikes in the U.S. in 1969 and 1970. Forty years later, there were only 16. John McClendon, an associate professor at the Fox School of Business, says less than 10 percent of the private-sector workforce is unionized, compared to 35 percent in the late 1950s. “If you look at the declining strike rate, that’s perfectly consistent with declining union membership itself,” he said.