Betsy Gordon photograph
Betsy Gordon, Accounting Department Chair

Dear Friends of the Department of Accounting,  

I am honored and humbled to become the chair of this great department. I have been a faculty member at the Fox School for 12 years. During that time, our department benefited tremendously from the leadership of the former chair, Eric Press. I will do my very best to continue that strong tradition of leadership. 

Now is a very exciting time for our department. We are positioned with a strong team of faculty, staff and students. Our faculty is composed of highly-accomplished research and practice professors who are nationally and internationally recognized. For example, Associate Dean Sudipta Basu was recently named the American Accounting Association’s inaugural Yuji Ijiri Lecturer on Foundations of Accounting, a prestigious lectureship sponsored by five global accounting associations. 

This fall, we hired Hyun Jong Park, an outstanding young scholar in auditing research. Together with Jagan Krishnan and Jayanthi Krishnan, a strong and accomplished group of auditing researchers. We also added considerable breadth to our faculty with Jose Munoz, who brings years of experience in the C-suite and teaching. Read on to learn about their research interests, approach to teaching and more. 

We are a very productive group of scholars. Over the past year, faculty published in top journals on topics such as internal control weaknesses and remediation, director liability reduction laws, executive compensation and taxation, health IT investments, international M&A and the market for control, and investor relations officers and disclosure.  

In the classroom, we continue to focus on developing critical thinking, decision making and problem-solving skills which offers us the agility to fold in new technologies and trends as they emerge. We know that today’s accounting students need to be able to use data analytics in problem-solving and decision making and to use the appropriate data tools. For example, Cory Ng has designed an undergraduate course in data analytics in accounting covering topics and tools such as robotic process automation, SQL, Alteryx and Tableau. In other accounting major courses, we have integrated cases and projects using tools including Tableau, Excel and ACL. Similar courses have been added to our Master of Accountancy program.

I have very high expectations that our faculty will continue to deliver outstanding teaching and professional development for our students, and will impact the profession through timely and relevant research. 

As always, you will get full disclosure in Footnotes from Fox. Go Owls!

Best regards,

Betsy

Jameel Rush photo

“I want to make sure everyone has the opportunity to be successful,” says Jameel Rush, BBA ’07 and adjunct professor at the Fox School. “Barriers to success for individuals and businesses exist. What drives my passion is creating those opportunities and ways to overcome those barriers to help organizations tap into every resource they can.” 

As associate vice president of Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) for Aramark, Rush leads D&I programs and initiatives across three areas: workforce, workplace and marketplace. He works to ensure that the company hires talent with backgrounds that reflect the communities the company serves, the culture values differences and drives innovation through inclusion and that they partner with diverse suppliers.

Aramark, a leader in food, facilities management and uniforms, has been recognized for diversity and inclusion efforts by organizations including the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s 2019 Corporate Equality Index (CEI), Diversity, Inc. and BLACK ENTERPRISE

Rush has played a significant role in making these achievements possible by working to highlight the possibilities for an organization that is highly inclusive and attracts talent across all walks of life. Along with making executives understand the business case for diversity, he investigates the importance of things like the language used in job postings, how culture and process effect talent recruitment and how diversity in suppliers helps to drive profits. 

In 2013 when he first joined Aramark, his interest in D&I was born. He was on a team responsible for designing, developing, implementing and managing an employee resource for young professionals focused on specific issues that impact them. “I fell in love with inclusion work once I was exposed to the industry,” he explains. The next year, he took the next step in his career and was named director of diversity and inclusion for the company. 

At the Fox School, Rush teaches courses in organizational leadership and business ethics. In this role, he blends his real-world experiences into lessons for students. But he does not have to force the issue, as topics like D&I often come up naturally because they are ingrained in the lives and courses of the modern college student. 

“We discuss issues like unconscious bias and discrimination—what they look like and how they function in today’s culture—and the importance of organizational policies to combat them from an ethical and a business standpoint.” 

The most important piece of advice Rush would give students and prospective students looking in his footsteps is to network, network, network. He suggests being intentional about maintaining those relationships and building an authentic brand in order to be remembered.

“Everyone has their own unique path,” he says. “Mine is one of many. But my opportunities have come from making friends and associates. If you get your name out there and do good work, a lot can happen.” 

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Fox Veterans associated image

The Fox School and Temple University is a thriving community of veterans, both current students and alumni. Between 2013 and 2017, 249 veterans earned degrees at the Fox School. And there are currently more than 400 veterans and veterans dependents enrolled. Since its founding 100 years ago, thousands of veterans have chosen to study business at the Fox School. To celebrate these business leaders’ commitments to their country, learn more about these accomplished Fox vets.

1. Edna Tuttleman, BS ’42

Back when Edna Tuttleman (1921-2013) was at Temple, the Fox School was called the School of Commerce. Tuttleman, who claimed her time here was “the most exciting period of my life,” became the university’s first female class president in 1939. Upon completion of her business degree, during World War II, Tuttleman joined the Navy’s Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service program. She eventually earned the rank of Lieutenant (junior grade). Professionally, she went on to run design operations at a clothing firm owned by her husband, Stanley Tuttleman.

Temple Lover: A longtime donor and trustee, the Tuttleman Learning Center is named after her and was made possible by gifts from the Tuttleman Family Foundation.

Art Lover: Edna and Stanley Tuttleman were collectors of art, and their name adorns the Tuttleman Gallery at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Their collection included works by Roy Lichtenstein, Fernando Botero, and Alexander Calder.

2. Dorothy S. Washburn, SMC ’31, MBA ’50

Dorothy Washburn (1909-1985), West Philadelphia born and raised, earned a BS from what is now the Klein College of Media and Communication, and an MBA from the Fox School. Her government career began during World War II when she worked as a clerk at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. She held several positions in the military and won outstanding service awards from the Army and the Air Force, for which she served as a Reserve Lieutenant Colonel. She also worked in Washington, D.C., for the Office of the Secretary of the Navy.

Fact: The Washburn Chair in Marketing, named after Dorothy S. Washburn, is presently held by Dr. Masaaki Kotabe.

Active Life: Washburn served on the board of the Philadelphia League of Women Voters and was a member of both Temple University’s Board of Managers and Temple’s Board of the General Alumni Association.

3. Mark J. Fung, MBA ’11

Rear Admiral Mark Fung joined the Navy in 1988 and he was deployed in support of Operation Desert Storm and the War on Terrorism. He currently works for the Naval Facilities Engineering Command as deputy chief of civil engineers and deputy commander. For his service, Fung has earned the Legion of Merit and the Bronze Star Medal. In his civilian life, Fung works as a project manager for AmerisourceBergen. 

Wise Words: “Life is too short to do something you don’t enjoy. I enjoyed my time at Temple, and at Fox, and I enjoy my work with the Navy. That’s the secret. What drives me, especially at this level of the Navy, where the stakes are high, is that there’s no room for second place. Even in the business world, you make decisions that affect the outcome of those who work for you and with you. It’s this responsibility to my team that makes me strive to perform at a higher level.”

4. Anthony McIntyre, BBA ’80

Following Anthony McIntyre’s time at the Fox School and Temple University—where he also played football and track and field—he was commissioned as a U.S. Army Reserve Officer and then spent several years as Company Commander of a floating craft company. Professionally, he worked for several years at the Graham Company and Xerox Corporation, before founding the McIntyre Group, an insurance brokerage firm, in 2002.

Temple Family: McIntyre’s wife, Christine, is an STHM graduate. His brother, Michael, earned his MBA from the Fox School.

Wise Words: “Nothing takes the place of persistence, hard work, and integrity. If you get knocked down, get back up. And take risks—with no risk, comes no reward.”

5. Paul Abrams, MBA ’16

Army Staff Sergeant Paul Abrams is the founder of RTB Limited, a soft skills training, and business consultancy. “We help fill the gap in startups to medium-sized businesses who don’t have the budget for a full training department,” says Abrams, who earned his MBA at the Fox School in 2016. 

Best Fox Memory: “I loved exposing my cohort members to professional rugby while visiting South Africa for my Executive MBA cohort’s Global Immersion trip. Rugby is a sport I am extremely passionate about; I played and coached for 15 years in the Army and for high-level clubs here in the U.S. Now that a league is starting here, I’d love to start a professional rugby team.”

Wise Words: “My discipline and attention to detail help me be a better leader in both business and the military. I also carry over the Army mantra ‘Be, Know, and Do.’ This creates a line of succession and constant training and communication in any business.

6. Joseph Petro, BS ’66

After earning his degree at the Fox School in 1966, Joseph Petro served as an officer in the U.S. Navy River Patrol Forces until 1970, including one year in Vietnam with River Division 512. He was discharged from the Navy as a Lieutenant. He has since worked as a special agent and senior executive in the U.S. Secret Service—Petro recounted these experiences, including his years alongside President Ronald Reagan, in his book, Standing Next to History: An Agent’s Life Inside the Secret Service—and a managing director at Citigroup. He is currently a senior vice president at Time Warner, Inc.

Wise Words: “Don’t be afraid to take chances—have confidence in yourself and work harder than everyone else.”

This story was originally published in Fox Focus, the Fox School’s alumni magazine.

mosquito in high definitionVictor H. Gutierrez-Velez never expected his work to lead him to the topic of public health. His expertise lies in remote sensing science, analyzing data such as satellite images. “Every day, numerous satellite images are taken,” says Gutierrez-Velez. And the information drawn from these images has both academic and commercial applications.

For example, satellite images can help prescribe management, fertilization, irrigation, and other activities in precision agriculture, according to Gutierrez-Velez. They can help the insurance industry assess risks related to flooding or other natural disasters, or to verify crop insurance complains. Satellite imagery can allow energy companies to pinpoint the ideal location for solar panels. And this kind of data, it turns out, can even come in handy when it comes to fighting certain diseases.

To that end, partnering with colleagues with expertise in biology and public health, Gutierrez-Velez, assistant professor in the College of Liberal Arts, has recently been drawn to an unlikely research subject: mosquitoes. Specifically, the tiger mosquito (scientific name: aedes albopictus). What’s so interesting about this tiny, blood-sucking bug?

“It’s worrisome. They can spread the Zika virus and other dangerous diseases,” says Gutierrez-Velez.

In 2016 when the Zika pandemic caught his interest, mosquitoes dominated the headlines. Once thought to be limited to tropical and subtropical regions, the tiger mosquito had expanded its territory into most continents. Climate change plays a role, but these mosquitoes are also particularly aggressive. They’re among the 100 most invasive species in the world. In the 1980s, they were first spotted in the U.S. in Texas. Today, they reach as far north as Connecticut. Their presence in Pennsylvania remains an ongoing public health concern.  

For his project, a recipient of the Office for the Vice President of Research‘s Targeted Grant Program and supported by the Data Science Institute housed at the Fox School, Gutierrez-Velez decided to look at multiple datasets, including climate data, information gathered from sampling for the presence of the tiger mosquito, land cover data, and census information. Gutierrez-Velez believes that with these and other datasets as inputs, machine learning and advanced algorithms can be used to predict the locations of tiger mosquito populations in advance of the season.

One of the most interesting possible findings of this research is that the tiger mosquito is less of a rural dweller than previously thought. “What we’re finding contradicts conventional wisdom about where these mosquitoes live. They are becoming domesticated animals. They prefer to be where lots of humans are living closely together—in cities. Because they love our blood,” says Gutierrez-Velez.

Scientific curiosity led Gutierrez-Velez to census data, which is not necessarily an obvious source of information to predict the presence or absence of a small flying bug. “If they feed on humans, human behavior should have something to do with it,” he says. And it does seem like including this data makes for a more accurate prediction about where the mosquitoes will go next.

Gutierrez-Velez’s ultimate goal for the project is to perfect a reliable working model that can be used to predict the upcoming mosquito season. Knowing that a particularly bad mosquito season is about to start will give officials the opportunity to plan in advance.

For example, the most affected areas can be targeted for treatment before the problem becomes unmanageable. Residents could be strongly cautioned in advance of the season to deal with housing-related conditions, such as places that collect standing water, which act as mosquito breeding areas. In the event that mosquitoes are spreading Zika or another virus, these protections could even save lives.

“There’s a lot we can do if we have a model that can say, ‘Hey, it’s going to be a bad year for mosquitoes, get ready,’” says Gutierrez-Velez.

This story was originally published in On the Verge, the Fox School’s flagship research magazine. For more stories, visit www.fox.temple.edu/ontheverge.

Students at Women In Beer event
Students attending Women in Beer with Molly Hayes.

Sheri Lambert, assistant professor of practice and the MS Marketing in Marketing Research and Insights program director, launched a new speaker series inviting undergraduate and graduate marketing majors to get up close and personal with industry experts.  

Before joining MSCM full-time, Lambert taught as an adjunct in the MIS/MSCM joint MS in Digital Innovation in Marketing program, contributing to the MIS guest lecture webinar series which reaches undergraduate, graduate and alumni students of Marketing and Management Information Systems programs. The MIS and MCSM Departments’ lecture series has earned a nomination for this year’s FOX Impact Award.

Lambert says, “The Industry Guest Lecture Series helps BBA, MBA and MS students prepare to excel in the marketplace and succeed in whichever career path they may choose. Series positively impacts students’ learning and preparedness for entry into the business world.”

Students listened to engaging presentations from professionals in different industries with the following MSCM offerings:  

  • Nima Gohil, Digital & Creative Research Consumer Evaluation on “Customer centricity & Connected Research” for L’Oreal NA
  • Michele Salomon, VP, Consumer Insights on “See What Matters: How Video is Transforming Research” for Big Sofa Technologies
  • Molly Hayes-Global, Director of Brand Insights on “The Other Half: Reconnecting Women & Beer” for Anheuser-Busch InBev
  • Anthony Pizzuto, Sr. Director, Days Inn Brand on “Hitting Reset: Making a 50-year old Brand Relevant Again” for Wyndham Hotels & Resorts
  • Eleni McCready, Sr. Dir, Media & Promotions on “Authentic Storytelling” for Lilly Pulitzer
  • Lori Bush, Entrepreneur and Retired CEO on “Let’s Get Phygital” for Rodan + Fields

Students see the value from the industry series and actively engage with the professionals at these events.

“As a student at the Fox School of Business, I have directly reaped the benefits of the Industry Guest Lecture Series with my peers. The professionals who have visited Temple University thus far have shared their stories behind cracking the code to some of modern marketing’s biggest challenges. Hearing these speakers helps individuals like myself make connections with business leaders. Another benefit of the speaker series is that it helps students draw parallels to what we are learning in the classroom and brings that content to life. It draws parallels that help bring classroom content to life. The hard work behind the scenes that goes into making this happen creates invaluable opportunities for the Fox community and opens doors to learn, gather advice and advance our careers,” says James Base, BBA ’19, president of the Temple University American Marketing Association.

“Sheri Lambert has completely exceeded and surpassed any expectation I could’ve ever imagined having at Temple University in the Marketing Department. She has brought real life into the classroom and expanded my knowledge by bringing Guest Lecturers to our campus,” says Isabel Paynter, senior, Marketing major.

When we bring experts onto campus, we continuously initiate impactful dialogue with industry professionals, who promote, stimulate and encourage additional conversations relevant to our classroom lessons. Each guest has offered a different perspective for students. They make learning about important issues more meaningful to students, and these discussions sparked excitement, as well as participation,” says Lambert.

MSCM thanks the presenters for their engaging programming and plans to open sessions to marketing alumni in the area, starting this fall. Please contact Nicole Stilianos at nstili@temple.edu to receive invitations.

The season of giving has been productive for the Fox School of Business. In the spirit of the holidays, the Fox School faculty and staff came up with creative ways to give back to Philadelphia and the Temple community.

Filling “Purses of Hope” for Local Women’s Shelters  

For their annual We Give Back event, the Fox School and School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management (STHM) marketing and communications team donated to local charity Purses of Hope. This organization delivers purse donations to women’s shelters in the South Jersey/Philadelphia area housing women in poverty or seeking refuge from abusive partners and toxic households. Each purse is filled with female hygiene, beauty or clothing products. The team was able to donate 100 purses to women in need!

Bartending Deans and Student Scholarship Donations

On Dec. 10, the Fox School and STHM faculty and staff  came together to celebrate a successful fall semester and give back to Temple University students. From 5-7 p.m., Dean Anderson and the rest of the Fox School dean’s served as guest bartenders at Interstate Draft House in Fishtown. All tips and $1 of every draft beer was donated to the Temple student scholarship fund, which helps provide accessibility and excellent education for students across all walks of life.

Have a suggestion for a great nonprofit or charitable organization that should be on our radar? Contact us!

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In honor of its Centennial anniversary, the Fox School of Business brought together alumni, students, faculty, staff, and friends of Temple University at Foxtoberfest, an outdoor event featuring food trucks, vendors, entertainment, giveaways, and a beer garden.

The fall festival was a century in the making, taking place 100 years after Temple’s business school was founded as the School of Commerce in 1918. Foxtoberfest celebrated entrepreneurship, a key pillar of the Fox School, by featuring Temple alumni-owned businesses, ranging from popular food trucks and donuts to a cell phone repair company and artists.

Among the more than 25 vendors lining Liacouras Walk and Montgomery and 13th Streets, 18 were alumni-owned, including:

As part of the celebrations, the first 100 people to each food truck and vendor were treated to free food, such as caramel apple and pumpkin bourbon ice cream sandwiches from Weckerly’s; roasted corn on the cob from Li Ping Corn Co; fried cheese curds from The Cow & The Curd; and healthy treats like gourmet fruit pops from Whimsicle and jars of fresh, local, and organic ingredients from Simply Good Jars. Factory Donuts took the celebration to the next level by bringing along 1,000 fresh donuts from its headquarters in Northeast Philly to the Temple community.

Attendees over the age of 21 years old mingled in the on-campus beer garden, playing lawn games and enjoying brews from alumni-owned breweries, including Love City Brewing (Melissa Walter, EDU ’11) and Victory Brewing Company (Bill Covaleski, TYL ’85).

Relive the celebration with our photo gallery and share your experience at the event by tagging #FOX100 and connecting with the Fox School on social media. To get involved with and commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Fox School of Business, visit the Centennial website to travel through an interactive timeline, share your story, and attend an upcoming event.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Translational Research Center launches
The Philadelphia Business Journal covers the launch of Fox’s Translational Research Center, which hopes to bridge the gap between business-school research and applications of it in industry. PBJ speaks with Fox’s Dr. Charles Dhanaraj about the Center, as well as last week’s kick-off summit. Read more >>

NCAA-in-Japan project in next phase
For now, Japanese universities do not formally recognize their sport teams. A research project, led by STHM’s Dr. Jeremy Jordan and Dr. Daniel Funk, is exploring the possibility of creating for Japan a sport governing body equivalent to the NCAA. Japan Times provides coverage of the project, which will soon enter its third phase. Read more >>

Philly Style profiles Porat
For its charity and social datebook, Philly Style Magazine speaks to Dr. M. Moshe Porat for a profile on the Fox and STHM dean. Porat discusses the schools’ growth and their focus on student professional development. Read more >>

The Atlantic | March 1, 2018
A feature story in The Atlantic identifies a recent study by Fox’s Dr. In-Sue Oh as one of 16 that have found coworkers to be the best-equipped predictors of an individual’s workplace success. Read more >>

WHYY | March 9, 2018
A sizable portion of land in Northeast Philadelphia, which had been dormant for years, has been purchased and will be converted into a logistics hub. Fox’s Tom Fung explains, in an interview for WHYY’s NewsWorks news show, the benefits for its use in supply chain. Listen >>

Philadelphia Magazine | March 8, 2018
Last week, Philly Mag asked a litany of local leaders to pick the best places in the city to hold coffee meetings. Fox’s Ellen Weber provides her pick. Read more >>

Al Dia | March 9, 2018
Recently and historically, economic implications have led millions of immigrants to the United States. For more on this, Fox’s Dr. Ram Mudambi speaks with Al Dia—the nation’s leading Latino news organization. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

 

Alter Hall, Home of the Fox School of BusinessLook around. They are in newspapers and social media feeds. They are online and on scrolling news tickers, too.

Almost daily, you’ll see splashy headlines announcing the latest scientific-research findings—from groundbreaking disease cures, to solutions for cell-phone addiction and possible causes of global warming.

Rarely, if ever, are real-world applications of business-school research given such a high-profile platform. Temple University’s Fox School of Business is hoping to alter that reality with the launch of a center designed to bring impact to the forefront of business-school research. Next week, the Fox School will host a workshop on March 12 to bring together industry leaders and top journal editors to start the conversation on driving real impact with scholarly research.

The Fox School’s Translational Research Center is the first of its kind nationally to attempt the alignment of business-school research produced by Fox’s award-winning faculty with critical problems of the industry and to communicate it quickly and effectively to practitioners and executives.

Why hasn’t such an endeavor been launched? There are multiple reasons, says Dr. Charles Dhanaraj, the Fox School’s H.F. “Gerry” Lenfest Professor of Strategy. Conventionally, business-school research is produced by faculty looking to earn tenure status, or as a mechanism to support the school’s reputation. Faculty often gauge the success of their research based upon the journal within which it’s published and the volume of citations it receives.

“Business schools need to go beyond academic citations; they need to create real impact on business and on policy,” said Dhanaraj, the center’s founding director. “That being said, the Fox School has more than 210 full-time faculty in a variety of research disciplines, which means we are uniquely positioned to accomplish those traditional research goals, too.”

“Everyone in academia discusses impact,” said Dr. M. Moshe Porat, the Fox School’s Dean. “How you define impact and how you measure impact takes time. We are moving in that direction. Our school has the agile, entrepreneurial faculty to take the lead in shaping the future of business school research—and not just ours, but for everyone.”

The Fox School’s Translational Research Center will focus on four dimensions of impact: academia, students, business, and society. The center enables faculty to broaden their scholarship portfolio and support them in stretching their reach.

Typically, translational research is linked to fields of medicine and science. This approach bridges multiple disciplines, as practitioners and academics work together to uncover new and innovative medicines and treatments.

Fox’s Translational Research Center will operate under a similar construct, Dhanaraj said.

“Think of it as push and pull,” Dhanaraj said. “We want to tap into the needs of industry to pull in their problems to drive our faculty research, and we want to push actionable insights in the most effective way back to the business community, as quickly as possible. Our mission is to change the way everyone thinks about business school research. We don’t want to simply overcome the perception of lack of relevance, but really demonstrate that research creates substantive value. By increasing the engagement of faculty with business executives, the Translational Research Center will ensure that our researchers are asking the right questions, and that they are producing their research in a way that it can be consumed by academic peers and leading practitioners.”

Eventually, the Fox School will house the Translational Research Center in 1810 Liacouras Walk. That space is currently under renovation. The Fox School’s expansion across Liacouras Walk is happening in conjunction with the school’s centennial. For now, the center operates out of Dhanaraj’s office.

“Between the center, our school’s expansion, and our 100-year anniversary, it is an exciting time to be at the Fox School,” he said.

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Students who earn degrees in information systems (IS) earn higher starting salaries than fellow business-school counterparts. And they benefit from one of the fastest national placement averages.

These statistics are just some of the findings from the latest edition of the Information Systems Job Index, produced by researchers from Temple University’s Fox School of Business, in partnership with the Association for Information Systems (AIS).

Published and released in January 2018, the third installment of the IS Job Index culled the responses of 2,140 IS graduates of the Class of 2017, from 58 universities nationwide.

Some of the index’s more-interesting findings include:

  • Salaries for IS undergraduates ($62,820) are the highest among students who pursue typical business majors ($52,047).
  • The percentage of women in IS jobs (39%) is more than double that of women in other STEM fields like computer science (18%).
  • Internships double the likelihood of an IS student getting a job offer (39% for those who hold at least one internship vs. 16% for those who do not).

“There are more than 3 million IS jobs in the U.S. alone,” said index co-author Dr. Munir Mandviwalla, associate professor of management information systems (MIS) at Temple University’s Fox School of Business. “This data is critical for parents of college-age children, current and prospective students seeking an accurate job outlook, employers, and policymakers—and it cannot be found anywhere else.”

Mandviwalla conducted research for the latest installment of the IS Job Index and co-authored it with Dr. Crystal Harold, associate professor of human resource management at Temple’s Fox School of Business, and Maria Boggi, a junior MIS major in the Fox School and Temple University Honor’s programs.

The AIS-Temple Fox School Job Index is the only systematic assessment of the IS job market. It is a joint project, with support from AmerisourceBergen and LiquidHub, to produce reliable national-level data on placement, job type, satisfaction, and related factors like career services, knowledge level, preparedness, and search strategies.

More: To read the Information Systems Job Index, visit isjobindex.com.

Interview requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

Learn more about Fox MIS degrees.
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