May 6, 2016
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Dean M. Moshe Porat addresses faculty and students to kick off the Fox School’s 100-year celebration. (Jim Roese Photography)

Dean M. Moshe Porat addresses faculty and students to kick off the Fox School’s 100-year celebration. (Jim Roese Photography)

A standing-room-only crowd helped Temple University’s Fox School of Business celebrate the launch of its forthcoming 100th anniversary. The most-comprehensive business school in Philadelphia, and one of the largest in the world, the Fox School will celebrate its centennial during the 2017-18 academic year.

Members of the Fox School Dean’s Council, student body, and faculty participated in this momentous occasion, held this past April in Alter Hall and kicking off one of the most-significant initiatives in the school’s history.

Cherry- and white-colored balloons decorated the Undergraduate Commons, as Dean M. Moshe Porat announced more events and engagement opportunities in the months ahead, all of which will be geared toward sharing in the Fox School’s renowned history.

“Tradition, distinction, and innovation are at the heart of what we do, and are as much a part of our rich legacy as our promising future,” Porat said.

Porat continued, addressing members of the Fox School’s faculty and student body who were in attendance: “There are not too many opportunities in one’s lifetime to celebrate a 100th anniversary of anything, and you are the reason we have so much to celebrate. I want you to share in this experience, which is a major historical event for our school.”

A capacity crowd gathers in the Undergraduate Commons of Alter Hall for the launch of the Fox School’s 100-year celebration. (Jim Roese Photography)

A capacity crowd gathers in the Undergraduate Commons of Alter Hall for the launch of the Fox School’s 100-year celebration. (Jim Roese Photography)

From its roots in 1918, when it was founded as Temple University’s School of Commerce, to today, the Fox School of Business has remained true to the vision of Temple founder Dr. Russell Conwell, Porat said, hiring influential researchers and inspirational faculty, enrolling diverse and accomplished students, and producing exceptional alumni.

“Throughout our growth, we have maintained a reputation of outperformance,” Porat said. “We have much to be proud of, and we look forward to many upcoming celebrations.”

Also in attendance were Temple University alumni Dennis Alter and Larry Magid, Fox alumnus and co-founder of Philadelphia’s Electric Factory Concerts, to discuss the intersection of business and the arts.

Alter, EDU ‘66, is the benefactor of Alter Hall, the home of the Fox School of Business, who was responsible for the art collection that adorns the building’s walls. Alter is an elected trustee of the Philadelphia Art Museum and a supporter of the arts, including the Barnes Foundation and the Opera Company of Philadelphia.

“You don’t have to be an inventor to be a success in the business world,” said Alter, a member of Temple University’s Board of Trustees. “Some of the most successful artists in the world thrived because they were persistent, they empowered onlookers globally, they were entrepreneurs at heart, and they embodied originality at their core.”

Graduating senior Ryan Rinaldi, a Finance major, speaks to attendees of the Fox School’s 100-year celebration launch event. (Jim Roese Photography)

Graduating senior Ryan Rinaldi, a Finance major, speaks to attendees of the Fox School’s 100-year celebration launch event. (Jim Roese Photography)

Magid is responsible for having lured top musical talents to Philadelphia for the last half-century. Magid has promoted thousands of performances and concerts, including those featuring The Rolling Stones and The Grateful Dead, among others. He also helped organize Live Aid in 1985 and Live 8 in 2005, two global music-driven fundraising initiatives.

Magid got his start in the music industry by selling $2 tickets to shows he had booked at Temple’s Mitten Hall.

“It didn’t take much imagination to know what was happening with my career and that I could make a living by taking this path,” Magid said. “It all starts with a dream, and how you go about realizing that dream.”

At an event geared toward Fox’s 100th birthday, Magid poked fun at his age.

“I’ve been working in this field for 54 years, which is exactly seven years longer than I’ve been around,” Magid said, deadpanning. “It goes without saying that the Fox School of Business has achieved much more than I have, and it’s exciting to see what is around the corner for this great school.”