andrisaniPaul J. Andrisani, 59, a professor of general and strategic management at The Fox School of Business and Management for 30 years, died in Wilmington, Del., on March 12 after a 22-month battle with cancer.

Paul served as the co-director of Temple’s Center for Competitive Government from 1997 to 2002, and was a driving force in several Mayor’s Summits on Technology sponsored by the center. Paul initiated and organized the first two Summits of the center in New York City. Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and the City of New York hosted both events in 2000 and 2001. The second event was co-hosted by Richard A. Grasso the CEO and President of the New York Stock Exchange where the event took place in its board room. Leading mayors and corporate CEOs attended both events. More information about the Summit at:  http://www.fox.temple.edu/cms_research/institutes-and-centers/center-for-competitive-government-2/conferences/.

Professor Andrisani has co-edited two books including Making Government Work: Lessons from America’s Governors and Mayors, Rowman and Littlefield, Lanham, MD. 2000, and The New Public Management: Lessons from Innovating Governors and Mayors, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Norwel, MA 2002.
http://www.fox.temple.edu/cms_research/institutes-and-centers/center-for-competitive-government-2/publications/.

According to Simon Hakim, co-director for the Center for Competitive Government, Andrisani was “well respected; he had extremely kind manners and treated people with a lot of dignity. Paul was a wise and talented person who at the same time cared and always helped other people. Paul was a fountain of original ideas that led to the success of the Center.”

Andrisani’s research focused on employment, earnings and occupational issues for elderly workers, minorities, women, veterans and the disabled. His students also knew him for his dedication and devotion. In his many years of teaching, even after he became ill, he never missed a day of class.

Andrisani earned both a bachelor’s in business in 1968 and an M.B.A. in 1970, both from the University of Delaware; and his doctorate in labor economics in 1974 from Ohio State University.