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Richard Lancioni | Dec. 11, 2011 | Larry Kane’s “Voice of Reason”

The holiday season is here and consumers are poised to buy. But will holiday spending sprees aid the economy’s long-term recovery or offer only a short-term boost? Fox Marketing and Supply Chain Management Chair Richard Lancioni doubts that holiday spending alone can revive the U.S. from recession. “In the short term the holiday season will have a very positive impact on the economy,” Lancioni said. “Over the long term, it may not be as impactful. A lot of retailers are hiring, but it’s only seasonal. You’ll see a lot of people laid off after the holiday season is over.”

 

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Derek Avery | Dec. 8, 2011 | Faculty Focus (University Communications)

By: | December 8th, 2011 | leave a comment

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Associate Professor of Human Resource Management Derek Avery prepares future HR managers by teaching the soft skills of how to relate to people, how to read between the lines, and how to communicate effectively. He focuses his research on workplace diversity. “It’s my passion. It’s understanding the little intricacies about the things that make us different – what differences do those differences make?”

http://news.temple.edu/news/faculty-focus-derek-avery

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Robert Giacalone | Dec. 6, 2011 | The Chronicle of Higher Education

The journal-review process is always the subject of some scorn among scholars. Fox School of Business Human Resource Management Professor Robert Giacalone laments the state of blind journal reviews and outlines the five “species” of reviewers he tends to encounter, including the insecure expert and the expert in everything. “I suppose I am grateful I have managed to get more than 100 articles through the review process,” writes Giacalone, editor of the Journal of Management, Spirituality & Religion. “I take comfort in knowing that, at least in reviewing articles for journals that only other academics will read, there is relatively little damage done to the larger universe of ideas.”

http://chronicle.com/article/The-5-Species-of-Journal/130016/

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Fred Murphy | Dec. 6, 2011 | KYW Newsradio 1060

Gas prices are down 9 cents in the past two weeks, and, thanks to the Internet, Americans have sharply increased their holiday spending. Is there a connection? “They (consumers) are shifting their buying patterns because the cost of driving to the big box stores is going up,” said Fred Murphy, a professor at Temple’s Fox School of Business who worked for the U.S. Department of Energy. “So, they are saving gasoline by buying online. I think they are buying more for Christmas because recent indications are that the economy is getting stronger and people are feeling more secure in their jobs so they are more willing to spend.”

http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2011/12/06/gas-prices-down-holiday-spending-up/

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Robert Giacalone | Dec. 5, 2011 | CareerBliss

By: | December 5th, 2011 | leave a comment

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Underplaying the relational side of work happiness cuts you off from the support systems you require and from the human coping mechanisms that are exactly what is needed in a sometimes insane job environment, writes Robert Giacalone, a human resource management professor at Temple’s Fox School of Business. In a guest column called the Career Healer, Giacalone recommends connecting with co-workers, lending an ear and being a role model. “The fact is that while you may not be able to get happier with the job, a focus on relational happiness can make you happier on the job.”

http://www.careerbliss.com/advice/the-career-healer-becoming-happy-on-the-job/

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Steven Pyser | Dec. 2, 2011 | Philadelphia Business Journal

Steven N. Pyser, assistant professor of human resource management at Temple’s Fox School of Business, teaches business ethics to undergraduates, who he says continually impress him. Philadelphia Business Journal editor Craig Ey can understand why. Ey, a judge for Pyser’s recent Ethics Case Competition, heard teams of students dissect and discuss ethical standards and policies in business. “I was impressed by their poise and knowledge,” Ey wrote. “These students seemed to get it.” As Pyser emphasizes, these Milennials “offer a renewed sense of purpose that business can be more than a closed system of profit maximization.”

http://www.bizjournals.com/philadelphia/print-edition/2011/12/02/dealing-with-ethical-dilemmas.html

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Aubrey Kent | Nov. 30, 2011 | Philadelphia Daily News

When Penn State replaces Joe Paterno, who earned about $1 million this season, they will get a serious case of sticker shock. It is no longer unusual for a proven coach to command an annual salary in excess of $2 million. “Most coaches think Paterno got a raw deal and won’t hesitate to take the job,” said Temple Sport Industry Research Center professor Aubrey Kent, who co-authored a forthcoming research paper on the determinants of coaching salaries in college football. “Overall, while I don’t think that PSU will have to pay a premium, they are crazy if they think they can get anyone good for $1 million. Those days are over.”

http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/colleges/20111130_JoePa_s_successor_won_t_get_JoePa_discount.html?page=1&c=y

 

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Crystal Harold | Nov. 27, 2011 | The Chronicle of Higher Education

Scholars who have been on the academic market know the competition for tenure-track jobs is fierce. But what they usually don’t realize is that there is still room to negotiate if they are offered a position. Crystal M. Harold, an assistant professor of human resource management at Temple’s Fox School of Business, co-wrote a paper examining negotiation tactics. Harold says a more collaborative strategy—which also resulted in salary increases for many people in her study—is a smart move in this economy. “You lay out what you want and let them know that you understand that times are tough,” she said. “Then the negotiator gives a little bit, and the organization gives a little bit. You feel better about the outcome, and so do they.”

 

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Joel Maxcy | Nov. 25, 2011 | Philadelphia Business Journal

NBA owners and players have reached a tentative agreement on a new collective bargaining agreement that would have teams playing a 66-game season starting on Christmas. Joel Maxcy, an associate professor of sport and recreation management at Temple, said the new ownership group of the Philadelphia 76ers has taken some positive steps during their early tenure, including cutting some individual ticket prices by at least 50 percent. The sale of the Sixers during the lockout, Maxcy said, may help the new owners if fans harbor any resentment over lost games. “If there is any kind of hangover,” he said, “[the new 76ers owners] can’t really be blamed.”

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NBA owners and players have reached a tentative agreement on a new collective bargaining agreement that would have teams playing a 66-game season starting on Christmas. Joel Maxcy, an associate professor of sport and recreation management at Temple, said the new ownership group of the Philadelphia 76ers has taken some positive steps during their early tenure, including cutting some individual ticket prices by at least 50 percent. The sale of the Sixers during the lockout, Maxcy said, may help the new owners if fans harbor any resentment over lost games. “If there is any kind of hangover,” he said, “[the new 76ers owners] can’t really be blamed.”

http://www.bizjournals.com/philadelphia/print-edition/2011/11/25/nba-lockout-not-dunking-phila-economy.html?page=all

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Gary Miller | Nov. 21-25, 2011 | Money Matters (Comcast)

By: | November 21st, 2011 | leave a comment

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Gary Miller, adjunct professor of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management, appeared as the featured guest on “Money Matters,” a regional program produced by Comcast. Miller, who owns Miller Insurance Associates, answered questions about insurance, safe investments and insurance ethics. “An insurance carrier is certainly concerned with the moral hazard because the presence of insurance always has a temptation of modifying human behavior, and the insurance transaction should not be a profit or a gamble transaction,” Miller said.

http://money-matterstv.com/watch.php?id=93

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