Fox School Press & Media

May 2015 – Research @ Fox

Fox PhD graduate wins 1st place in prestigious doctoral dissertation award


Discussed in this issue:
• Marketing PhD candidate accepts tenure-track position at Emory University
• International Business PhD candidate accepts tenure-track position at Ohio University
• Finance PhD candidate accepts tenure-track position at University of Quebec at Montreal

Fox School Press & Media

Fox’s Online MBA rated No. 1 nationally for military veterans

Photo of Temple University Main Campus Military TributeThe Online MBA program at Temple University’s Fox School of Business has been named best in the nation for military veterans.

U.S. News & World Report unveiled its rankings of the country’s top online undergraduate and graduate programs for military veterans May 19. The publication ranked the Fox School’s Online MBA program No. 1 nationally for its range of benefits for veterans.

The Fox School and Temple University support the Yellow Ribbon Program for military personnel and veterans. This provision allows colleges and universities in the United States to voluntarily enter into an agreement with Veterans Affairs to fund tuition expenses that exceed the highest public in-state undergraduate tuition rate.

Additionally, Temple University is routinely designated by GI Jobs Magazine as one of the nation’s top military-friendly colleges and universities.

“The Fox School’s commitment to providing Yellow Ribbon Program match scholarships to eligible applicants is a key component of our ongoing and strong relationship with military veterans,” said Dr. M. Moshe Porat, Dean of the Fox School of Business. “These scholarships help offset tuition costs for students who reside out of the state of Pennsylvania and for those who are not completely funded by their benefits.”

This is the latest in a series of accolades for Fox’s Online MBA program. In January, U.S. News ranked the program No. 1 in the nation. And earlier this month, The Princeton Review rated Fox’s Online MBA No. 5 in the world.

In the Fox Online MBA program, which launched in Fall 2009, students benefit from a flexible curriculum carousel with multiple entry points. The Fox School’s Online MBA program begins with a weeklong residency at Temple University’s Main Campus in Philadelphia. The residency features a leadership course, networking, team building, professional development and special events. Each subsequent online course is delivered one at a time over four weeks, and the program can be completed in as quickly as 20 months.

The program employs a flipped-classroom approach – a 24/7, on-demand format that allows students to learn content at their pace and collaborate with their peers and professors through digital dialogue. Then, in an integrated, synchronous online classroom setting, they are able to put what they have learned into practice.

Fox School’s Video Vault, a collection of more than 1,500 academic videos produced by Fox faculty, acts as a vital resource of the program. The Video Vault features a searchable archive with HD-quality, mobile-friendly, transcribed videos that are engaging for the student.

The full rankings of U.S. News’ top online MBA programs for veterans can be found here.

Fox School Press & Media

Fox School welcomes prestigious guests, speakers for NSF-funded big data workshop

Photo of  Attendees listen to Google Chief Economist Hal Varian, one of many premier panelists at the Fox School’s Privacy in an Era of Big Data Workshop.

Attendees listen to Google Chief Economist Hal Varian, one of many premier panelists at the Fox School’s Privacy in an Era of Big Data Workshop.

Google “big data,” and the first search result returns the word, “dangerous.”

The irony of using a big data factory to discover the risks of its own data was not lost on researchers and experts attending the Privacy in an Era of Big Data workshop, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and hosted by the Fox School of Business and Temple University’s Big Data Institute.

“Big data” is loosely defined as the collection and analysis of large data sets of complex information. As the scope of collected data increases, there is a significant need for advanced analytic techniques and the development of new methods of investigation. Temple’s Big Data Institute was established to harness the full potential of big data and enable further research on the subject with an interdisciplinary approach by bringing together seven related research centers across the university and the Fox Chase Cancer Center.

Co-founder of the Institute Dr. Paul A. Pavlou, Chief Research Officer and Associate Dean of Research, Doctoral Programs, and Strategic Initiatives, along with Dr. Sunil Wattal, Director of the Center on Web and Social Media Analytics and Associate Professor of Management Information Systems, were awarded a grant from the NSF to further their investigation into unexplored links between big data and privacy.

“This is a topic that’s on everyone’s minds, and we’re here to get some useful insight on it,” Wattal said.

The workshop, held April 22-23, was a part of a weeklong event to encourage big data research from industry, government, and academia on the future of big data and privacy. The goal of the workshop, Pavlou said, was “to create a forward-looking research agenda into the future of big data.”

A priority for attendees was establishing the balance of big data with privacy rights, in order to improve national security and further develop consumer marketing. Dr. Thomas Page, Technical Director for Core Infrastructure & Cloud Repositories at the National Security Agency, represented the government perspective on big data, with a keynote presentation.

“There’s a moral responsibility in this space. We’re doing this on behalf of the American people,” Page said.

Page called for a new focus when discussing big data. “Big Smart Data,” he said, avoids unnecessary or intrusive information from reaching analysts, and allows new public policy to be enacted that balances personal privacy and national security concerns.

Page’s keynote address raised concerns of a “zero sum game,” wherein consumers trade privacy for national security. Christina Peters, Chief Privacy Officer at IBM, noted that she believes the two are not equivalent. Citing instances of security breaches at Target and Home Depot, she indicated how a history of misuse or neglect has risked consumer information.

Hal Varian, Chief Economist at Google, discussed the trust contract held between consumers and big data collectors. He argued that big data factories have the most to lose. “Search engines have a lot more to lose than a human. When computers screw up they screw up big,” Varian said.

Google’s top search results for “how do I know” are: “if I’m pregnant,” “if I’m gay,” and “if I have AIDS,” all of which, Varian said, demonstrate Google’s desire to not only share a vast amount of information, but to also take seriously its responsibility as an online confidante.

“Search engines are the biggest privacy enhancers in the world. People won’t ask these questions to their lawyer, doctor, parents, or priest. This is the first time you can get this type of answer from a non-human,” said Varian, who also served as the featured keynote speaker at the Frederic Fox Lecture Series April 23, another event during Big Data Week.

Varian explained that the intended use of big data is to educate consumers on the difference between privacy and security. Since privacy is the restricted use of personal information, a responsibility of big data should be to protect the security of the data and manage the risks associated with personal data analytics.

A closing comment from the first day of the workshop was the idea that “big data is the new bacon,” as presented by Lael Bellamy, Chief Privacy Officer at The Weather Channel. Her support of improved data collection and consumer intelligence reinforced the notion that although big data is trending, it’s been around for a long time.

“It’s possible everyone can benefit from the Big Data revolution,” said Carnegie Mellon University professor Dr. Rahul Telang.

Fox School Press & Media

Fox School of Business to offer new undergraduate majors in Supply Chain Management, Financial Planning

Interior Image of Alter HallThe Fox School of Business at Temple University will introduce two new undergraduate majors for the 2015-16 academic year: Supply Chain Management and Financial Planning.

In all, the Fox School offers students a choice of 15 undergraduate majors.

“The additions of Supply Chain Management and Financial Planning as majors further bolster the Fox School’s reputation as not only the most comprehensive business school in the Philadelphia region, but one of the most comprehensive in the nation,” said Dr. M. Moshe Porat, Dean of the Fox School of Business. “Employers and industry partners agree that these concentrations are regarded as emerging fields wherein professionals are in great demand, and Fox has the renowned faculty to support such programs.”

The new majors are available to all students. Students entering their junior and senior years can declare for either of the majors and still remain on four-year academic plans. Interested juniors and seniors are encouraged to meet with a Fox School advisor to discuss their academic options.

The Supply Chain Management major will prepare students to operate and lead major aspects of the supply system in both established and start-up firms. Fox’s Marketing and Supply Chain Management department will oversee the program, which will ready students for careers in the interconnected chain of suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses and distribution centers, transportation-providers, retailers.

“Businesses today operate on a global scale,” said Dr. Neha Mittal, Assistant Professor and Academic Director of the undergraduate Supply Chain Management program. “For example, it’s very common for a company to have its sourcing in South America, manufacturing in China, and sales of its products to markets in Europe or North America. We’re talking about huge, complex supply chains here, which have fueled the need for supply chain management professionals to manage the flows between the different parties.”

The Financial Planning major will prepare students for careers in the growing field bearing the same name, which takes a holistic approach to working with clients in order to enable them to identify and attain lifestyle and retirement goals. Students who complete the Financial Planning curriculum are eligible to sit for the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) examination upon graduation – a unique feature of the program.

Fox’s Finance department will oversee the program, and will draw upon the expertise of faculty in Fox’s Legal Studies and Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management departments, as well, said Cynthia Axelrod, Assistant Professor and Financial Planning Program Director.

“Within the next 20 years, 10,000 baby boomers will retire every day. This will produce a tremendous intergenerational wealth transfer, for which there won’t be nearly enough advisors to take on the burgeoning growth of clients and client assets,” Axelrod said.

“Further, retirement planning now resides with employees, not employers.  Individuals need help with retirement planning and investments. A financial planner brings objectivity to the process, and helps their client to develop a successful roadmap to attain their financial goals. A career in financial planning is very rewarding, allowing an individual to combine their investment skills and people skills, with excellent economic potential. All of this will lead to strong prospects for our students majoring in Financial Planning.”

Fox School Press & Media

Sunil Wattal | May 18, 2015 | The Philly Voice

Crowded marketplace?
A number of sites cater to crowdfunding, which helps raise money for various causes, and is monetarily supporting one injured Philadelphia man’s physical therapy. Dr. Sunil Wattal, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems, summed up the practice: “Fundraising has changed in the sense that now you not only need to be able to reach out to people, but to tell your story in an engaging way.”

Fox School Press & Media

M. Moshe Porat | May 18, 2015 | Metro MBA Philly

Executive MBA ranked No. 1 in Philadelphia
An MBA-centric online outlet that reports on graduate business programs in a number of major U.S. cities, Metro MBA Philly repurposed Fox School’s press release regarding the news that its Executive MBA program retained its No. 1 ranking in the Philadelphia region, according to the latest rankings by The Economist. Dean M. Moshe Porat is quoted.

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Online MBA | May 14, 2015 | Temple Today

Online MBA ranked No. 5 in the world
Temple’s daily e-newsletter picked up Fox School’s press release regarding the Online MBA program’s No. 5 ranking globally by The Princeton Review.

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Five years later, students in Fox School course still leading the way in social entrepreneurship

10-10-10

It started in January 2010 with a $10 bill.

In the five years since its inaugural spring semester, the 10-10-10 Foundation – launched out of Dr. Jean Wilcox’s Entrepreneurial Marketing course at the Fox School of Business – has seen more than 1,000 students raise in excess of $200,000 and help innumerable people and foundations in the Philadelphia area.

Each semester, Wilcox presents student teams in her course with $10 from her own pocket. Grouped into 10 teams, the students are tasked with multiplying this seed money by a factor of 10, to be donated to various charities, non-profits, foundations, and community organizations dedicated to anything from social works to education.

“Many of the students have incredibly powerful personal stories to tell and align their projects with organizations that they feel a connection to. That’s what makes this work,” said Wilcox, an Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management.

Dr. Jean Wilcox

Among the organizations helped, Fox Students have worked with Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society, in eight of 10 semesters since 10-10-10 began. Others have aligned with Philabundance food bank, Alex’s Lemonade Stand, and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

For senior Marketing majors Jake Kawulicz and Nicole Borgia, Red Paw Relief Team was a natural fit. One of their team members was saved from a house fire by his pet. In pitching to the idea of raising funds for Red Paw, a non-profit organization that helps pets displaced by fire or disaster, the group decided it was an appropriate gesture to repay his dog’s act of kindness. The team organized a fundraising effort at Whole Foods, which contributed a five-cent donation each time customers used reusable bags to carry out their groceries, and in addition to a half-price promotion at the Draught Horse Pub and Grill, near Temple University’s campus.

“There’s a personal connection for us. It’s about giving back to something I love,” Borgia said.

Fundraising efforts are one part of students’ responsibilities toward building sustainable business plans for their chosen organizations. Others include maintaining careful financial records while engaging with the community on social media to promote their efforts.

The use of social-media platforms has allowed students who are working with Project Home to raise awareness for the 25-year-old organization, which empowers the homeless. With a comprehensive social-media marketing campaign, the group recruited volunteers whose hours equated to a $20 fundraising effort. The group also aimed to foster an intern exchange program with the Fox School.

“We wanted something local to Philadelphia that would allow us to have a lasting impact, as opposed to just giving money,” said Leigh McKenzie, a junior Management Information Systems major who worked with Project Home.

The Entrepreneurial Marketing course attracts a diverse student set, including senior Architecture major and Business minor Jenna Wandishin, and sophomore Marketing and Art History double major Laura Harris. Dual-enrolled in the Fox School and the Tyler School of Art, and inspired by this dichotomy, the students dedicated their group to inspiring inner-city artists through the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, an anti-graffiti program that supports public art.

“We wanted something with a cultural impact. The Mural Arts Program is unique to Philadelphia and enhances the city,” Wandishin said of Philadelphia, which boasts more murals than any other American city.

Wilcox has watched 10 semesters of students turn her $10 handouts into thousands of dollars. She said she appreciates the social impact the students have made. In particular, one group worked with Catalyst Foundation to fight sex trafficking in Vietnam by connecting with Asian-American organizations on Temple’s campus. Another team committed its efforts toward assisting wounded veterans upon their returns from Afghanistan.

“The best comment I ever got came from one of my colleagues, who said, ‘Business school is so much about analytics and numbers, and what you’re doing is giving these students heart,’” Wilcox said. “That’s most important to me in the long run.”

Fox School Press & Media

Darin Kapanjie and David Siwy | May 5, 2015 | U.S. News & World Report

How online MBA students find mentors
How does an Online MBA student identify mentors within his or her program? Attend meet-and-greets and residencies, or set up alternate in-person meetings, says David Siwy, a 2013 alumnus of Fox’s Online MBA program. U.S. News features Siwy, a real estate agent based in Doylestown, Pa., throughout the piece. (Online MBA Academic Director Dr. Darin Kapanjie also spoke with the reporter, but was not quoted.)

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The Economist ranks Fox’s Executive MBA No. 1 in Philadelphia region

The Economist Which MBA? logoThe Executive MBA program at Temple University’s Fox School of Business retained its No. 1 ranking in the Philadelphia region, according to the most-recent rankings released by The Economist.

The Economist ranked Fox’s Executive MBA program No. 28 among U.S. colleges and universities in its “Which MBA?” rankings report, published May 14. The Fox Executive MBA has been ranked No. 1 in the Philadelphia region by The Economist since 2013, when the London-based publication last released its worldwide, executive MBA rankings.

Globally, the Fox Executive MBA is ranked No. 45.

“The Fox Executive MBA has a strong history of sustained excellence, and we are proud to retain our designation as the best in the Philadelphia region,” said Fox School Dean M. Moshe Porat. “The program leverages critical elements of the Fox School of Business: influential research by elite faculty, a diverse and exceptional student body, and a robust global network of alumni who hold high-ranking positions in various facets of industry.”

The Economist’s “Whose MBA?” rankings, which equally weigh personal and professional development measures, consider: quality of students; quality of program; career and salary progression; and helpfulness of alumni, among other criteria.

Fox’s Executive MBA program, which can be completed in only 16 months, is built on face-to-face classroom time delivered one weekend per month and supplemented by interaction with classmates and faculty via WebEx, the premier web-conferencing platform. Online collaboration reduces travel and minimizes the time students, who average 12 to 14 years of industry experience, will spend away from home and office.

Courses for the program are held at The HUB, a vibrant business center located in Center City Philadelphia. The HUB features comprehensive communication services and state-of-the-art audio and visual equipment.

Fox recently consulted with 300 corporate leaders in order to gain deeper insight into needed skills and competencies supporting program and curricular relevancy. The Executive MBA program has recently expanded its corporate partnerships and alumni relationships, to further develop and improve its student services and offerings, according to Dr. Michael Rivera, Academic Director of Fox’s Executive MBA.

“The Fox Executive MBA was designed to fit the needs of mid-level professionals looking to become senior or c-level executives,” Rivera said. “Our program not only expands students’ business toolkits with breadth and depth, but also focuses on developing them as transformational leaders, providing numerous opportunities for global experience and immersion, and also supporting their professional development through executive mentoring and coaching.”

“With our mantra, ‘Learn over the weekend, apply on Monday,’ students notice the powerful impact on their careers almost immediately.”

Click here to view The Economist’s complete “Which MBA?” rankings report.

Fox School Press & Media

Fox School’s Sigma Chapter hosts financial literacy seminar for area high school students

Assistant Professor of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management Michael McCloskey speaks to area high school students on the significance of financial literacy.

Assistant Professor of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management Michael McCloskey speaks to area high school students on the significance of financial literacy.

It’s not what you make. It’s what you save.

That’s what Michael McCloskey said, as he asked for a student volunteer to share details of his personal finances.

At that moment, a hand shot into the air. The area high school student divulged to McCloskey how much money he earns each month by working his part-time job, and also how much he spends. Then McCloskey asked the student if he owns a car. The student replied yes, but added that his parents manage its related expenses.

“Well, that’s going to change one day,” said McCloskey, Assistant Professor of Risk, Insurance and Healthcare Management at the Fox School of Business, “and it’s important that everyone in this room is prepared for that day.

The Fox School hosted more than 70 high school students from the Philadelphia region April 29 for a first annual Financial Literacy seminar, offering a variety of guest speakers on topics ranging from early investing, credit, and financial aid for college.

Fox School’s Sigma Chapter of Gamma Iota Sigma, a risk and insurance fraternity, organized the four-hour event, to demonstrate the importance of managing one’s personal finances to prevent common financial pitfalls and to encourage better decision-making in regard to money. Reducing student debt is one of six commitments made by Temple University President Neil Theobald, who recently implemented the Fly In 4 program.

The event opened with McCloskey’s discussion on investing for the future. McCloskey, who teaches a general education course on the subject, explained the difference between good credit and bad credit, introduced the students to terms like insolvency and net worth, and encouraged them to jot down their monthly expenditures as a way of tracking their spending.

The students also learned about college admissions and financial aid application procedures from David Kaiser, Director of Undergraduate Enrollment at the Fox School, and Celeste D. Roberts, Temple’s Assistant Bursar of Financial Literacy. Following a lunch break, the students met with Fox senior Francesca Waddington, Sigma’s Vice President of Community Affairs, for a discussion focusing on the college experience.

“Four years ago, I was extremely confused with applying for financial aid and student loans, and had little understanding of what impact this would have on me when I graduated,” said Waddington, who organized the event with the help of Vice Dean Debbie Campbell, Director of Undergraduate Enrollment David Kaiser and Sigma Director of Community Affairs Sean Johnson.

“I think it’s crucial to educate students who plan to attend college on exactly what the financial burden is and, more importantly, how to lessen this burden. I think understanding how to become financially literate is vital to success, which was our inspiration for starting an event like this.”

The Financial Literacy seminar served as just one of many initiatives organized by the Sigma Chapter. In April, Sigma presented a check for $11,200 to its charity of choice, Brave Hearts for Strong Minds. The organization, based in the Philadelphia area, collects educations funds for children who have lost an income-earning parent.

For more information on the Sigma Chapter of Gamma Iota Sigma, visit its website.

Fox School Press & Media

Fox’s Online MBA ranked top-5 globally by The Princeton Review

Princeton Review LogoThe Online MBA program at Temple University’s Fox School of Business has been recognized by The Princeton Review as one of the best in the world.

The Fox Online MBA earned a No. 5 global ranking, according to The Princeton Review’s inaugural online MBA rankings report. The program continues to receive acclaim. In January, the Fox Online MBA earned a No. 1 national ranking by U.S. News & World Report.

“Bridging an accredited, high-impact curriculum with innovative technology is the benchmark of the Fox Online MBA, and publications like The Princeton Review have taken notice,” said Fox School Dean M. Moshe Porat. “Our internationally recognized faculty fosters a dynamic learning community, and our Online and Digital Learning team has brought the finest technological advancements to an online education.”

The Princeton Review’s global rankings of online MBA programs, published May 12, focused on five core criteria: academics, selectivity, faculty, technical platforms, and career outcomes. The rankings considered not only school data, but also survey responses by current students and alumni.

Fox Online MBA students praised the Fox School’s “high-end new facilities, rising rankings and strong brand equity,” according to The Princeton Review’s report. Past students also lauded the “invaluable” immersion sessions, calling them “incredibly and highly beneficial,” and “one of the aspects of this program that sets it apart from other online MBA programs.” Another said the “rigor of the program adds tremendous credibility.”

“The Fox School has an extremely strong regional, and expanding national presence,” one student said in a survey submitted to The Princeton Review. “I like the idea that I can go anywhere, and employers recognize and appreciate the quality of a degree from Temple’s business school.”

In the Fox Online MBA program, which launched in Fall 2009, students benefit from a flexible curriculum carousel with multiple entry points. The Fox School’s Online MBA program begins with a weeklong residency at Temple University’s Main Campus in Philadelphia. The residency features a leadership course, networking, team building, professional development and special events. Each subsequent online course is delivered one at a time over four weeks, and the program can be completed in as quickly as 20 months.

The program employs a flipped-classroom approach – a 24/7, on-demand format that allows students to learn content at their pace and collaborate with their peers and professors through digital dialogue. Then, in an integrated, synchronous online classroom setting, they are able to put what they have learned into practice.

Fox School’s Video Vault, a collection of more than 1,500 academic videos produced by Fox faculty, acts as a vital resource of the program. The Video Vault features a searchable archive with HD-quality, mobile-friendly, transcribed videos that are engaging for the student.

“While other online programs may rely on third-party providers for program delivery, Fox’s advantage lies in providing the same academic experience, faculty access and student support as any other program on campus,” said Dr. Darin Kapanjie, Academic Director of Fox’s Online MBA program. “We have invested in the resources necessary for delivering a top-notch learning environment that fosters collaboration and community with academic excellence at our core.”

Merit scholarships are available, as are scholarship-incentive programs for Temple alumni and for corporate partners that have two or more employees simultaneously enrolled in the Fox Online MBA program. Financial aid counseling is offered to all students, and the Fox School and Temple University support the Yellow Ribbon Program for military personnel and veterans. Students in the Online MBA enjoy the same tuition rate, whether in or out of state.

Click here for the full rankings list from The Princeton Review.

Fox School Press & Media

Corinne Snell | April 30, 2015 | CBS 3

How to ask for a raise
Employees who think they deserve a raise don’t always know how to properly broach this topic. CBS 3 Eyewitness News’ Jim Donovan stopped by Alter Hall last week to speak with Center for Student Professional Development Executive Director Corinne Snell, Fox’s Assistant Dean for Student Professional Development, for tips on how to request a raise.

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Forrest Huffman | April 23 and 24, 2015 | Jewish Exponent

Fox’s Huffman covers two topics
Forrest Huffman, Professor of Finance and Real Estate Program Director, spoke twice with Philadelphia’s Jewish Exponent. Thanks to a 2013 law, Camden, N.J., will benefit from a number of upcoming construction projects. Huffman offered input on whether the city will ever become a destination for families looking to relocate across the river. A day later, Huffman commented on Comcast’s newest addition to the Philadelphia skyline, and the many ways the new complex will impact the city.

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Fox Focus – Spring 2015