Students at Women In Beer event
Students attending Women in Beer with Molly Hayes.

Sheri Lambert, assistant professor of practice and the MS Marketing in Marketing Research and Insights program director, launched a new speaker series inviting undergraduate and graduate marketing majors to get up close and personal with industry experts.  

Before joining MSCM full-time, Lambert taught as an adjunct in the MIS/MSCM joint MS in Digital Innovation in Marketing program, contributing to the MIS guest lecture webinar series which reaches undergraduate, graduate and alumni students of Marketing and Management Information Systems programs. The MIS and MCSM Departments’ lecture series has earned a nomination for this year’s FOX Impact Award.

Lambert says, “The Industry Guest Lecture Series helps BBA, MBA and MS students prepare to excel in the marketplace and succeed in whichever career path they may choose. Series positively impacts students’ learning and preparedness for entry into the business world.”

Students listened to engaging presentations from professionals in different industries with the following MSCM offerings:  

  • Nima Gohil, Digital & Creative Research Consumer Evaluation on “Customer centricity & Connected Research” for L’Oreal NA
  • Michele Salomon, VP, Consumer Insights on “See What Matters: How Video is Transforming Research” for Big Sofa Technologies
  • Molly Hayes-Global, Director of Brand Insights on “The Other Half: Reconnecting Women & Beer” for Anheuser-Busch InBev
  • Anthony Pizzuto, Sr. Director, Days Inn Brand on “Hitting Reset: Making a 50-year old Brand Relevant Again” for Wyndham Hotels & Resorts
  • Eleni McCready, Sr. Dir, Media & Promotions on “Authentic Storytelling” for Lilly Pulitzer
  • Lori Bush, Entrepreneur and Retired CEO on “Let’s Get Phygital” for Rodan + Fields

Students see the value from the industry series and actively engage with the professionals at these events.

“As a student at the Fox School of Business, I have directly reaped the benefits of the Industry Guest Lecture Series with my peers. The professionals who have visited Temple University thus far have shared their stories behind cracking the code to some of modern marketing’s biggest challenges. Hearing these speakers helps individuals like myself make connections with business leaders. Another benefit of the speaker series is that it helps students draw parallels to what we are learning in the classroom and brings that content to life. It draws parallels that help bring classroom content to life. The hard work behind the scenes that goes into making this happen creates invaluable opportunities for the Fox community and opens doors to learn, gather advice and advance our careers,” says James Base, BBA ’19, president of the Temple University American Marketing Association.

“Sheri Lambert has completely exceeded and surpassed any expectation I could’ve ever imagined having at Temple University in the Marketing Department. She has brought real life into the classroom and expanded my knowledge by bringing Guest Lecturers to our campus,” says Isabel Paynter, senior, Marketing major.

When we bring experts onto campus, we continuously initiate impactful dialogue with industry professionals, who promote, stimulate and encourage additional conversations relevant to our classroom lessons. Each guest has offered a different perspective for students. They make learning about important issues more meaningful to students, and these discussions sparked excitement, as well as participation,” says Lambert.

MSCM thanks the presenters for their engaging programming and plans to open sessions to marketing alumni in the area, starting this fall. Please contact Nicole Stilianos at nstili@temple.edu to receive invitations.

The season of giving has been productive for the Fox School of Business. In the spirit of the holidays, the Fox School faculty and staff came up with creative ways to give back to Philadelphia and the Temple community.

Filling “Purses of Hope” for Local Women’s Shelters  

For their annual We Give Back event, the Fox School and School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management (STHM) marketing and communications team donated to local charity Purses of Hope. This organization delivers purse donations to women’s shelters in the South Jersey/Philadelphia area housing women in poverty or seeking refuge from abusive partners and toxic households. Each purse is filled with female hygiene, beauty or clothing products. The team was able to donate 100 purses to women in need!

Bartending Deans and Student Scholarship Donations

On Dec. 10, the Fox School and STHM faculty and staff  came together to celebrate a successful fall semester and give back to Temple University students. From 5-7 p.m., Dean Anderson and the rest of the Fox School dean’s served as guest bartenders at Interstate Draft House in Fishtown. All tips and $1 of every draft beer was donated to the Temple student scholarship fund, which helps provide accessibility and excellent education for students across all walks of life.

Have a suggestion for a great nonprofit or charitable organization that should be on our radar? Contact us!

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

In honor of its Centennial anniversary, the Fox School of Business brought together alumni, students, faculty, staff, and friends of Temple University at Foxtoberfest, an outdoor event featuring food trucks, vendors, entertainment, giveaways, and a beer garden.

The fall festival was a century in the making, taking place 100 years after Temple’s business school was founded as the School of Commerce in 1918. Foxtoberfest celebrated entrepreneurship, a key pillar of the Fox School, by featuring Temple alumni-owned businesses, ranging from popular food trucks and donuts to a cell phone repair company and artists.

Among the more than 25 vendors lining Liacouras Walk and Montgomery and 13th Streets, 18 were alumni-owned, including:

As part of the celebrations, the first 100 people to each food truck and vendor were treated to free food, such as caramel apple and pumpkin bourbon ice cream sandwiches from Weckerly’s; roasted corn on the cob from Li Ping Corn Co; fried cheese curds from The Cow & The Curd; and healthy treats like gourmet fruit pops from Whimsicle and jars of fresh, local, and organic ingredients from Simply Good Jars. Factory Donuts took the celebration to the next level by bringing along 1,000 fresh donuts from its headquarters in Northeast Philly to the Temple community.

Attendees over the age of 21 years old mingled in the on-campus beer garden, playing lawn games and enjoying brews from alumni-owned breweries, including Love City Brewing (Melissa Walter, EDU ’11) and Victory Brewing Company (Bill Covaleski, TYL ’85).

Relive the celebration with our photo gallery and share your experience at the event by tagging #FOX100 and connecting with the Fox School on social media. To get involved with and commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Fox School of Business, visit the Centennial website to travel through an interactive timeline, share your story, and attend an upcoming event.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Translational Research Center launches
The Philadelphia Business Journal covers the launch of Fox’s Translational Research Center, which hopes to bridge the gap between business-school research and applications of it in industry. PBJ speaks with Fox’s Dr. Charles Dhanaraj about the Center, as well as last week’s kick-off summit. Read more >>

NCAA-in-Japan project in next phase
For now, Japanese universities do not formally recognize their sport teams. A research project, led by STHM’s Dr. Jeremy Jordan and Dr. Daniel Funk, is exploring the possibility of creating for Japan a sport governing body equivalent to the NCAA. Japan Times provides coverage of the project, which will soon enter its third phase. Read more >>

Philly Style profiles Porat
For its charity and social datebook, Philly Style Magazine speaks to Dr. M. Moshe Porat for a profile on the Fox and STHM dean. Porat discusses the schools’ growth and their focus on student professional development. Read more >>

The Atlantic | March 1, 2018
A feature story in The Atlantic identifies a recent study by Fox’s Dr. In-Sue Oh as one of 16 that have found coworkers to be the best-equipped predictors of an individual’s workplace success. Read more >>

WHYY | March 9, 2018
A sizable portion of land in Northeast Philadelphia, which had been dormant for years, has been purchased and will be converted into a logistics hub. Fox’s Tom Fung explains, in an interview for WHYY’s NewsWorks news show, the benefits for its use in supply chain. Listen >>

Philadelphia Magazine | March 8, 2018
Last week, Philly Mag asked a litany of local leaders to pick the best places in the city to hold coffee meetings. Fox’s Ellen Weber provides her pick. Read more >>

Al Dia | March 9, 2018
Recently and historically, economic implications have led millions of immigrants to the United States. For more on this, Fox’s Dr. Ram Mudambi speaks with Al Dia—the nation’s leading Latino news organization. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

 

Alter Hall, Home of the Fox School of BusinessLook around. They are in newspapers and social media feeds. They are online and on scrolling news tickers, too.

Almost daily, you’ll see splashy headlines announcing the latest scientific-research findings—from groundbreaking disease cures, to solutions for cell-phone addiction and possible causes of global warming.

Rarely, if ever, are real-world applications of business-school research given such a high-profile platform. Temple University’s Fox School of Business is hoping to alter that reality with the launch of a center designed to bring impact to the forefront of business-school research. Next week, the Fox School will host a workshop on March 12 to bring together industry leaders and top journal editors to start the conversation on driving real impact with scholarly research.

The Fox School’s Translational Research Center is the first of its kind nationally to attempt the alignment of business-school research produced by Fox’s award-winning faculty with critical problems of the industry and to communicate it quickly and effectively to practitioners and executives.

Why hasn’t such an endeavor been launched? There are multiple reasons, says Dr. Charles Dhanaraj, the Fox School’s H.F. “Gerry” Lenfest Professor of Strategy. Conventionally, business-school research is produced by faculty looking to earn tenure status, or as a mechanism to support the school’s reputation. Faculty often gauge the success of their research based upon the journal within which it’s published and the volume of citations it receives.

“Business schools need to go beyond academic citations; they need to create real impact on business and on policy,” said Dhanaraj, the center’s founding director. “That being said, the Fox School has more than 210 full-time faculty in a variety of research disciplines, which means we are uniquely positioned to accomplish those traditional research goals, too.”

“Everyone in academia discusses impact,” said Dr. M. Moshe Porat, the Fox School’s Dean. “How you define impact and how you measure impact takes time. We are moving in that direction. Our school has the agile, entrepreneurial faculty to take the lead in shaping the future of business school research—and not just ours, but for everyone.”

The Fox School’s Translational Research Center will focus on four dimensions of impact: academia, students, business, and society. The center enables faculty to broaden their scholarship portfolio and support them in stretching their reach.

Typically, translational research is linked to fields of medicine and science. This approach bridges multiple disciplines, as practitioners and academics work together to uncover new and innovative medicines and treatments.

Fox’s Translational Research Center will operate under a similar construct, Dhanaraj said.

“Think of it as push and pull,” Dhanaraj said. “We want to tap into the needs of industry to pull in their problems to drive our faculty research, and we want to push actionable insights in the most effective way back to the business community, as quickly as possible. Our mission is to change the way everyone thinks about business school research. We don’t want to simply overcome the perception of lack of relevance, but really demonstrate that research creates substantive value. By increasing the engagement of faculty with business executives, the Translational Research Center will ensure that our researchers are asking the right questions, and that they are producing their research in a way that it can be consumed by academic peers and leading practitioners.”

Eventually, the Fox School will house the Translational Research Center in 1810 Liacouras Walk. That space is currently under renovation. The Fox School’s expansion across Liacouras Walk is happening in conjunction with the school’s centennial. For now, the center operates out of Dhanaraj’s office.

“Between the center, our school’s expansion, and our 100-year anniversary, it is an exciting time to be at the Fox School,” he said.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Students who earn degrees in information systems (IS) earn higher starting salaries than fellow business-school counterparts. And they benefit from one of the fastest national placement averages.

These statistics are just some of the findings from the latest edition of the Information Systems Job Index, produced by researchers from Temple University’s Fox School of Business, in partnership with the Association for Information Systems (AIS).

Published and released in January 2018, the third installment of the IS Job Index culled the responses of 2,140 IS graduates of the Class of 2017, from 58 universities nationwide.

Some of the index’s more-interesting findings include:

  • Salaries for IS undergraduates ($62,820) are the highest among students who pursue typical business majors ($52,047).
  • The percentage of women in IS jobs (39%) is more than double that of women in other STEM fields like computer science (18%).
  • Internships double the likelihood of an IS student getting a job offer (39% for those who hold at least one internship vs. 16% for those who do not).

“There are more than 3 million IS jobs in the U.S. alone,” said index co-author Dr. Munir Mandviwalla, associate professor of management information systems (MIS) at Temple University’s Fox School of Business. “This data is critical for parents of college-age children, current and prospective students seeking an accurate job outlook, employers, and policymakers—and it cannot be found anywhere else.”

Mandviwalla conducted research for the latest installment of the IS Job Index and co-authored it with Dr. Crystal Harold, associate professor of human resource management at Temple’s Fox School of Business, and Maria Boggi, a junior MIS major in the Fox School and Temple University Honor’s programs.

The AIS-Temple Fox School Job Index is the only systematic assessment of the IS job market. It is a joint project, with support from AmerisourceBergen and LiquidHub, to produce reliable national-level data on placement, job type, satisfaction, and related factors like career services, knowledge level, preparedness, and search strategies.

More: To read the Information Systems Job Index, visit isjobindex.com.

Interview requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

Learn more about Fox MIS degrees.
For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

More isn’t always better—and that theory applies to social media advertising.

Recent research findings suggest that the volume of social media posts will drive consumers to unfollow the accounts of even their favorite companies and brands. This was especially true within cities of greater per-capita population density, and when social posts are sent during traffic peak hours of 5-8 p.m., according to researchers from the Fox School.

Dr. Paul Pavlou

The researchers found both a short-term benefit and a long-term loss with regard to this form of social media marketing: While posts led to 5% sales increases, the posts often “fatigued and frustrated” consumers and increased the likelihood that they would unfollow these accounts by more than 300%.

“Companies may be inclined to intensify their advertising on social media once they see the immediate benefits,” said Dr. Paul A. Pavlou, the Fox School’s Senior Associate Dean of Research, Doctoral Programs, and Strategic Initiatives. “The volume and timing of these posts, however, may drive consumers to unfollow these accounts and be less likely to purchase from these companies in the future.”

Fox School PhD student Shuting Wang led the study, “Tempting Fate: Social Media Posts by Firms, Customer Purchases, and the Loss of Followers,” along with Pavlou and University of Minnesota associate professor Dr. Brad Greenwood.

Shuting Wang

The team worked with data from a Chinese fashion company that conducted its social media marketing through WeChat, China’s Facebook equivalent. The company, which has retail locations in 99 Chinese cities, sent identical messaging to its followers, regardless of their city of origin and their city’s population density. The company would post to WeChat four times per month and only during the 5-7 p.m. timeframe. While this method produced temporary jolts in sales, it ultimately cannibalized the company’s long-term sales, the researchers found.

“Our recommendations included a complete change of strategy, with a reduction in arbitrary posts that could create annoyance or interruption, and a plan to send messages only during non-peak traffic density hours,” Pavlou said.

For more on the study, or to schedule an interview with the researchers, contact: Christopher A. Vito, Associate Director of Communications and Media Relations, (215) 204-4115, cvito@temple.edu.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

How much do our children influence our consumption behavior? Much more than we thought.

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

A new study by a Temple University Fox School of Business professor finds that teenage girls have a strong influence on the products their mothers buy solely for personal use, as in makeup or clothing, and that mothers have a much stronger tendency to mimic their daughters’ consumption behavior than vice versa.

“This finding provides initial support for the notion of reverse socialization and suggests that the impact adolescents have on their parents is much more profound than has been credited to them,” Dr. Ayalla A. Ruvio, lead author and an assistant professor of marketing, writes in a forthcoming Journal of Consumer Behavior article.

This phenomenon – an intentional decision-making process of whom to mimic and how – produced a new term and inspired the article’s title: the consumer doppelganger effect.

“It is not merely the mimicking act that is conscious,” the researchers wrote of the consumer doppelganger effect. “The findings clearly indicate that the subjects intentionally choose the figure they want to emulate and report their inclination to mimic their consumption behavior.”

The researchers analyzed whether teenage girls tend to emulate their mothers’ consumption behavior or whether mothers mimic their daughters. The study, conducted through questionnaires, sampled 343 mother-daughter pairs, with an average age of 44 for the mothers and 16 for the daughters. The researchers found that if a mother is young at heart, has high fashion consciousness and views her daughter as a style expert, she will tend to doppelgang her daughter’s consumption behavior.

However, even if the daughter has high interest in fashion and an older cognitive age –thinking she’s older than she is – she still is less likely to view her mother as a consumer role model and to doppelgang her.

According to the researchers, the mother-daughter model is the first to test “bidirectional influence,” or whether the consumer doppelganger effect can go both ways. Ruvio and her colleagues integrated “two streams of research,” the study of mimicry and literature on role modeling, to demonstrate that “children affect their parents’ consumption behavior with regard to the products that the parents themselves consume.”

Feb. 24, 2011

About 1,000 members and supporters of Pennsylvania labor unions rallied in Center City on Thursday to support Wisconsin’s embattled public workers. Their message: Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to strip collective bargaining rights from nearly all public employees is a deliberate attempt to destroy the middle class. John McClendon, an associate professor at the Fox School of Business who studies labor relations, says Walker’s proposal is unprecedented. “We’ve never seen anything quite like this in terms of an effort to roll back those collective-bargaining rights,” he said. “The implications for this could be very meaningful for other states, Indiana, Ohio and who knows where else.”

Continue to 6ABC to read more…

Jan. 26, 2011

Phillies fans are well aware of Jimmy Rollins’ exploits on the field, but most probably don’t know that he’s been quietly paving the way for a post-baseball career as a music mogul. The all-star shortstop gave a tutorial Tuesday to 150 students at the Fox School of Business. Rollins, CEO of the Jimmy Rollins Entertainment Group, owns 5 percent of the publishing rights to Justin Bieber’s “Eenie Meenie” and received platinum records to mark 1 million units sold. “Music is American history,” he said. “It’s not gonna go in the books, but it’s gonna be in our hearts, our memories. It’s gonna capture that moment. So if I can own a piece of that, that would be great.”

Continue to Philadelphia Daily News to read more…

Sept. 12, 2010

Once considered the place for panicked seniors to look for jobs ahead of graduation, college career offices are reporting dramatic hikes in use by first-year students looking for the earliest possible jump on the employment market. The Career Center at Temple, which saw a 22 percent increase in use by freshmen last year, held its first event specifically for first-years in late August. Jim Tutelman, a partner at the accounting firm PriceWaterhouseCoopers, recruited at a recent career fair for new students at Temple’s Fox School of Business. Reaching out to freshmen builds a company’s name recognition and familiarizes them with the variety of jobs available. “There are many more opportunities in the public accounting profession,” Tutelman said. “You don’t necessarily have to be an accounting major.”

July 7, 2010

First quarter 2010 numbers are in, and Venture Capital investment in both dollars and deals were down. The good news, if you can call it that, is that it’s better than Q1 2009. Interestingly, the percentage of venture and angel funds investing in seed-stage companies increased 40 percent from 2009 based on the second annual survey of its members by the National Association of Seed and Venture Funds (NASVF) and the Temple University Fox School of Business.

Continue reading at OPEN Forum…

April 10, 2010

Job hunting is on the minds of graduating college seniors. Temple University’s Career Center is seeing an interesting employment trend: Last year, for the first time, its survey of graduating seniors found that self-employment ranked among the top five jobs. Two Temple students featured in the article are Fox School entrepreneurship students. “The hard work is starting to pay off, but I still have a long way to go,” said Mohamed Ali Niang, a junior entrepreneurship and international business/economics major who plans to start a rice-marketing business in his home country of Mali. “These are not really secrets, but hard work, creativity, being cross-cultural and learning from mistakes as well as others are critical.”

Continue to USA Today to read more…

April 8, 2010

It’s only taken 28-year-old CEO Tom Szaky a few years to build TerraCycle into a competitive company with a sustainable mission to turn unrecyclable trash into a wide range of products. Seven years ago, Szaky was in the same place as the Fox School of Business students he spoke with April 5. Szaky, part of Fox’s showcase of businesses with sustainable practices, offered advice on start-ups and entrepreneurship using examples from his Trenton-based business, which makes everything from bags to cleaners to shower curtains. “You have to be ridiculously persistent and then you have to really believe in your product,” he said.

Read more at Philly.com’s, Philadelphia Business Today…

April 7, 2010

CNBC Anchor Maria Bartiromo and Comcast Executive Vice President David L. Cohen visited the Fox School of Business for the “Success: Reaching It, Keeping It” event presented by CBS Radio Philadelphia. Bartiromo provided insights from her bestselling book, “The 10 Laws of Enduring Success,” while Cohen reflected on his extraordinary career with the Philadelphia communications giant.