On February 2, Temple University’s Liacouras Center was buzzing with excitement for the Fox School of Business and School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management winter graduation ceremony, where over 500 undergraduate and graduate degrees were conferred.

The keynote speaker was Lori Bush, MBA ’85. Following her position as the president of Nu Skin, the personal care brand, Bush served as the CEO and president of skin care company Rodan + Fields until her retirement in 2016.

Lori Bush, MBA ’85.

In her speech, Bush, the author of a best-selling wellness book titled Write Your Skin a Prescription for Change, detailed how she achieved great things in her career by being scrappy, leveraging her strategic training, and pushing the limits of business with limited resources. She advised the new graduates to look at the small moments of everyday life through a business lens, as this can lead to meaningful, career-changing insights.

“Everything is business,” said Bush. “You have to take inspiration from everyday life—then just add business principles and stir.”

The student speaker was Beatrice Raccanello Esq., MBA ’17. Raccanello, a native of Italy, earned her law degree from Bocconi University in Milan, and then relocated to Philadelphia to earn her Master of Laws from Temple University’s James E. Beasley School of Law. While working full-time for the Beasley School, as the assistant director of the Office of Graduate and International Programs, Raccanello enrolled in the Fox School’s Part-Time MBA program.

Beatrice Raccanello Esq., MBA ’17.

Raccannello spoke about how she was initially afraid to move to an unfamiliar country, but that her experiences as an international student ultimately molded her into a bolder leader. She found strength and inspiration by working with other exceptional students in the Part-Time MBA program who, like her, had full-time jobs, family responsibilities, and other life commitments.

“We became better leaders,” she said, noting how beneficial it was to work with students who brought diverse backgrounds and professional perspectives to the classroom. “We were able to collaborate to pursue our dreams.”

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.


There’s a first time for everything—that includes playing a live show at your alma mater.

Dan Campbell, EDU ’11, has made a name for himself as the lead singer of The Wonder Years. He and his band have toured extensively throughout the U.S. and around the world. For all of the concerts Campbell has played, none has taken place on Temple University’s Main Campus.

That changes next month.

Campbell will visit Main Campus as the Fox School of Business presents his side project, Aaron West and The Roaring Twenties, for a students-only concert.

The Friday, Feb. 16 event at the Temple Performing Arts Center begins at 5 p.m. It is part of the Fox School’s ongoing 100th anniversary celebration throughout 2018. The exclusive acoustic set will feature a question-and-answer session with Campbell, who will share personal lessons on the business of managing and marketing a band, “from garages and basements to international tours,” he said.

“I’ve never played music on Temple’s campus before this,” Campbell said. “Coming back to campus is a somewhat rare occurrence, but it’s always marked with a trip to the Bagel Hut and a lot of gawking at all the new buildings and expanded pieces of campus. The growth at Temple in the last seven or eight years has been unbelievable.”

The Fox School spoke with Campbell recently, for details about his upcoming show and his connection to the business school:

Most music fans know you from The Wonder Years, so what can students expect when they come to an Aaron West and the Roaring Twenties show?

“Generally, the biggest change with an Aaron West show is that I do them in character. For those unaware, Aaron West and the Roaring Twenties is a work of fiction told through music. It follows the story of a man named Aaron through a tumultuous time in his life and, to do the story justice, I play the shows as Aaron, totally through including between-song banter. This isn’t really an Aaron West show, though. This is more of a Q+A panel with an acoustic set mixed in. So, in this instance, I won’t be in character. Instead, I’ll be appearing as myself, playing mostly Aaron West songs and answering questions from the audience, collected before the show begins.”

This show is part of the Fox School’s 100-year anniversary. What’s your connection to Fox?

“My main connection to Fox is that my step-mom (Debbie Campbell) is the school’s senior vice dean. She asked me to come and be a part of the celebration and I was happy to oblige. Otherwise, the connection goes only as far as Alter Hall providing me a warm building to eat lunch in during the winter months when I was a student.”

The show supports Symphony for a Broken Orchestra. What can you tell us about that charitable cause?

“My dad actually brought the charity to my attention. It’s a Temple Contemporary program attempting to repair the thousands of broken instruments owned by the School District of Philadelphia. The idea is to put functioning instruments back into the hands of Philadelphia public school students and encourage expression through music.”

Have you found applications for your English literature degree in your lyric writing?

“This is a difficult thing to quantify because my time spent studying literature has obviously had a major impact on the way that I communicate, in general. By exposing me to new voices and ideas, my time at Temple helped me hone and refine my voice. If I had to pin down one thing that most altered my course as a writer, it would be an independent study I took with Stan McDonald, (associate professor at Temple’s College of Liberal Arts), who critiqued my poetry and helped me shape my style with a specific audience in mind.”

At your show, you’ll also be discussing the business side of managing and promoting a band. What’s the No. 1 lesson you’ve learned from your experiences?

“I’ve learned to never stop trying to find ways to do ‘it’ better, no matter what ‘it’ is. Is there a better option for getting our equipment to overseas shows? Is there a better t-shirt blank we should consider printing on? Is it more beneficial to bring a photographer on tour to create content or another stage tech to help the show run more smoothly? Should we consider playing two nights in a smaller room over one night in a bigger one? We’ve never been afraid to question the way we do anything to find an option that offers us more upside.”

While Dan Campbell’s Feb. 16 concert is free of charge, donations in any $5 increment to Symphony for a Broken Orchestra are required to secure tickets. Here’s how to donate:

  • In-person. Visit Alter Hall either Jan. 30 or Feb. 15, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., and make a donation at the table near the first-floor security desk.
  • Online. Donate at Symphony for a Broken Orchestra’s website and email your receipt to dcampbell@temple.edu.
  • Social media. Tickets also will be available through the Fox School’s social media channels.
Learn more about the Fox School’s Centennial celebration.
For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

For high school seniors, this time of year can create anxiety—and a flood of questions.

“What will college be like?”

“What are the first steps once I arrive?”

“How do I network? Or land an internship?”

Next week, nearly 100 seniors from Cristo Rey Philadelphia High School will have the answers to all of these questions (and more) after visiting Temple University.

The students will engage in a networking social event called “Project: Career,” where they will meet with marketing students and faculty from Temple’s Fox School of Business, and dozens of local business leaders.

“The event is like the speed-dating equivalent of networking,” said Drew Allmond, assistant professor of marketing at the Fox School. “Cristo Rey’s students will shake hands, introduce themselves, and exchange business cards with our students, faculty, and area business professionals. They will share their career goals, and Fox’s marketing students will offer tips on navigating college, building networks, and beyond.”

This is the second year of the workshop between Temple’s business school and Cristo Rey, a private high school located in the city’s Germantown section. Cristo Rey combines traditional academic schoolwork with professional work experience. Each student, from grades 9 through 12, works a real job for real wages five days each month. This affords Cristo Rey students the professional development opportunities they need at the next level, and substantially reduces the students’ tuition expenses at the school.

“The impact extends beyond that,” Allmond said. “Our students get the chance to act as mentors, instead of as the ones being mentored. And Cristo Rey’s students earn valuable networking skills that transfer to the next level—college.”

What: “Project: Career” student networking event

Where: Temple University’s Fox School of Business—Alter Hall (1801 Liacouras Walk)

When: Friday, Jan. 26, 2018 (2:30-4 p.m.)

Who: Seniors from Cristo Rey Philadelphia High School will receive professional-development coaching from students and faculty at Temple’s Fox School, and dozens of local industry professionals.

Day-of contact: Drew Allmond, assistant professor of marketing at Temple’s Fox School of Business, will be available for interviews on the day of the event, and can be reached at 215-806-0287. Joanna Wusinich, Cristo Rey’s director of work-study programs, also will be available.

For more information and to schedule an interview, contact Christopher A. Vito, Associate Director of Communications and Media Relations, at cvito@temple.edu or (215) 204-4115.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.
Ariell Johnson, BBA ’05, at Amalgam Comics and Coffeehouse. (Photo: Ryan Collerd)

When Ariell Johnson, BBA ’05, was a kid growing up in Baltimore in the 1980s she cut comics out of newspapers, glued them to construction paper, and tried to sell them.

Back then, there was no way of knowing she’d one day open a comic book shop, Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse, in Philadelphia. Or that Ira Glass would interview her there for an episode of “This American Life.” Or that MacArthur Fellow Ta-Nehisi Coates and Civil Rights Movement icon and Congressman John Lewis—both of whom have recently been involved in comics, with the Black Panther series and March, respectively—would visit and stroll Amalgam’s shelves. But even as a kid, Johnson was a gifted entrepreneur and her family knew she was destined for something amazing.

“I always marched to my own drum and I was always business-minded,” recalls Johnson. “My mom would joke that she’d never have to worry about me being broke because I’m a hustler. I had a very crafty grandma who taught me how to knit and crochet and embroider. And anything I learned how to do, I’d try to make money from it. I would even make things out of Play-Doh and sell them. I’ve always been entrepreneurial.”

When Johnson moved to Philadelphia to attend Temple University, she initially wanted to study dance. But her sister, an actuary, convinced her to major in accounting at the Fox School. After graduating in 2005, she briefly worked in retail and as a bookkeeper for a nonprofit and a local community newspaper. She considered becoming a certified public accountant, but the thrill was gone.

“I enjoy accounting,” she explains, “but I couldn’t do it all day, everyday. There’s a part of me that loves sitting and staring at spreadsheets, but I need a creative aspect to my work.”

Johnson, while a student at the Fox School, had the idea of opening a comic book shop. She’d fallen in love with comics after watching the X-Men cartoon in her youth—especially the character Storm—and she dove headfirst into Philly’s comic book scene. She became a regular at Fat Jacks Comicrypt. After scoring new books, she’d read them over hot chocolate at the nearby coffee shop, Crimson Moon.

“I loved nerding out in public,” she says, “and being at a coffee shop thumbing through a comic was really cool. When Crimson Moon closed, I had the idea for Amalgam. I didn’t have a place to go, so I thought it would be great if the comic book store were a coffee shop and a community space, too. That was the rough idea, but I was still in school then and not thinking about it too seriously. It was my pipedream.”

It took a terrible tragedy to push Johnson’s plan forward. When her mother died, it caused her to re-evaluate her life goals. She decided she needed to do something daring, something that would make her happy, and so she grabbed her dream and ran with it.

Amalgam Comics and Coffeehouse. (Photo: Ryan Collerd)

In December of 2015, Amalgam Comics & Coffeeshop opened its doors along the Frankford Arts Corridor in the Kensington neighborhood. The space is hip and fun, with exposed brick walls, high ceilings, industrial flourishes, colorful furniture, and thousands of comics. She knew it was wise to diversify, and so Amalgam includes a coffee shop where people can read and sip hot chocolate, just like Johnson did back in the day.

Amalgam is much more than just comics and a café. There are nightly events, including readings, workshops, signings, open mics, comedy shows, and book clubs. The program calendar at the store is already jam packed, and business is about to get even busier. Earlier this year, Amalgam was one of 33 projects chosen to win a prestigious Knight Foundation grant. The project? Creating Amalgam University.

“It’ll allow us to have dedicated, enhanced space for programming,” Johnson says about the grant. “Our hope is to create a multipurpose room and to provide affordable comic book education, including writing, penciling, coloring, and professional development, such as how to pitch comics and put together a portfolio. We’ll especially be targeting underrepresented groups, including people of color, women, and people from the LGTBQ community.”

It’s been an exceptionally busy first two years. Johnson has juggled running the shop, managing nine employees, expanding the business and programming, and fulfilling dozens of interview requests from the press. In addition to being interviewed by Glass, she has been featured in articles by NPR, The Philadelphia Inquirer, CNN, and The New York Times. One question everyone asks her is when she’s opening another store.

“I’m making sure this one’s sustainable before I think about opening a new one,” she laughs. “We’re still a very small business, so I’m watching everything that’s going out and coming in, and if I know the store’s going to be quiet, I’ll work a shift by myself. We’re expanding so fast, but when I first saw this building, I knew immediately I wanted to turn it into an educational space. I had all these ideas, but I never dreamed we’d be able to do them so quickly.”

“And now it’s all happening.”

Ariell Johnson. (Photo: Ryan Collerd)

What Ariell’s Reading

Godshaper, by Simon Spurrier and Jonas Goonface

“It takes place in a world where the rules that govern science and technology stop working, so there are no modern conveniences. Instead, everyone has their own personal god that fulfills what technology used to. The class of people capable of shaping gods are godless themselves, and live as vagabonds, so there are interesting parallels with current events, mainly discussions about immigrant workers.”

Frostbite, by Joshua Williamson and Jason Shawn Alexander

“It’s a post-apocalyptic world where scientists were trying to fix global warming but they messed up and froze the world. The new currency’s heat, and frostbite is this highly contagious disease where people turn to ice. To reduce chances of spreading it, they have to burn entire cities down. It’s interesting because there are still people denying climate change today, and who knows where we’ll be in 20 years.”

Learn more about Fox School undergraduate programs.
For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

The talented, diverse, and driven Class of 2021 at the Fox School of Business are poised to become the next generation of innovators and business disruptors. They arrive highly-accomplished and are excited to hone their skills with the help of our top-tier faculty, market-driven curriculum, and professional development opportunities.

In fall 2017, the Fox School redesigned the Bachelor of Business Administration Core Curriculum to weave critical thinking, communication, and quantitative reasoning skills into the fabric of core business knowledge. The redesign team continues to work with students, alumni, faculty, staff, and employers to integrate these skills across the curriculum to better position Fox undergraduates for success post-graduation. These four freshmen are among the first to participate in the enhanced curriculum.

Watch the video below and read on to learn more about these four freshmen who are ready to change the world.

Nasir Mack

  • Hometown: Philadelphia
  • Age: 18
  • Major: Business Management
  • Career goals: CEO, creative director, project manager
  • Hobbies: Public speaking, reading, writing
  • Hidden talent: Making music, playing violin

Meredith Orme

  • Hometown: Royersford, Pa.
  • Age: 18
  • Major: Business (declaring Accounting)
  • Career goals: Grad school, then Certified Public Accountant
  • Hobby: Competitive horse rider
  • Hidden talents: “I can bake pretty well and I love to make handmade gifts!”

LJ Troilo

  • Hometown: Havertown, Pa.
  • Age: 19
  • Major: Entrepreneurship, Marketing
  • Career goals: Serial entrepreneur, thought leader
  • Current businesses: Symbie (social networking app) and eThree (sales engagement platform)
  • Claim to fame: Joined rapper Travis Scott onstage at concert and knew every word

Robert Zurzolo

  • Hometown: Medford, N.J.
  • Age: 19
  • Major: Finance, Entrepreneurship
  • Career goals: Wealth management sales or investment banking firm in mergers and acquisitions
  • Dream: “To retire from the financial field after 15 to 20 years and work as a high school math teacher in my hometown.”
  • Current business: Has run landscaping company, Robert Z Properties LLC, since freshman year of high school
  • Hobby: “I love to travel. I went to Switzerland this fall and Italy this summer.”
  • Hidden talents: Good cook and ping pong player
Learn more about Fox School undergraduate programs.
For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Does speed matter in e-commerce? How can you eliminate the harmful effects of smoking on society? How can you predict which movies will be a hit or a bust? These were the questions posed this year by the annual Temple University QVC Analytics Challenge and its sponsors QVC, Pfizer, and NBCUniversal.

Now in its fifth year, 582 students from 10 different schools and colleges across the university participated in the competition, organized by the Institute for Business and Information Technology (IBIT), where participants solve important industry-specific problems using data. This year’s 245 entries were judged in two categories—analytics and graphics—and winners took home $12,000 in cash prizes from the event, held Nov. 13, 2017 at Alter Hall, home of the Fox School of Business.

The winner of the graphics category was a team consisting of Charles Attisano and Luke Harding, two seniors studying graphic and interactive design at the Tyler School of Art. They worked on the NBCUniversal challenge about movie box office forecasting and produced a short video exploring the topic, which you can watch here.

“We concluded that, on average, the highest performing movies in the box office tend to be adventure films with production budgets between $100-250 million, and release dates in May, June, or December,” said Attisano and Harding. “Providing a formula for success, on average, may help a producer choose a genre, budget, and release date. One of the most important things we learned in the process is that storytelling is an integral part of the analyzing process, and that you must communicate your analysis in a clear manner.”

The winner in the analytics category was a team of four Fox School students majoring in management information systems: Ngoc Pham, Chi Pham, Run Zhu, and Jiawei Huang. They focused on QVC’s e-commerce problem, and showed how the shopping network can ship the right products at the right time to its customers. (See the winning infographic here.)

“Working with raw data is like playing a video game,” the team explained. “You have the same goal to fulfill certain tasks, and there are tons of approaches that can be used to accomplish this goal. We provided our recommendations for highly underutilized distribution centers in terms of product categories based on their sales. By implementing our recommendations, QVC could increase its sales volume in California, Texas, and Florida within three months.”

One of the most thrilling aspects of the Analytics Challenge is that participants represent many different schools and colleges across the university. This means teams approach data, analysis, and visualization in diverse ways, and they bring unique, multi-disciplinary insights to each problem.

“It was exciting this year to see how well so many students from so many different majors instinctively understood the importance of the science of data,” said Laurel Miller, assistant professor of management information systems, IBIT director, and the co-founder of the Analytics Challenge. “It was hard to pick the winners, and all the students should feel proud of how well they did.”

Learn more about the Temple University Analytics Challenge.
For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Life is unpredictable. Tammylynn Rodriguez, BBA ’17, can attest to that.

Rodriguez initially enrolled at Temple University’s Fox School of Business to earn a traditional, on-campus Bachelor of Business Administration degree. And despite a fire in her family home and maintaining full-time employment, she wasn’t willing to put her dreams on hold.

Tammylynn Rodriguez

“(Fox’s program) really allowed me to be myself,” said Rodriguez, who addressed fellow students during her undergraduate commencement ceremony in May.

Is there an appropriate time for students like Rodriguez to transfer into an online degree program?

U.S. News & World Report asked that question and spoke with Rodriguez, who’s now a Fox Online MBA student. U.S. News also reached out to Elvita Quiñones, who often counsels Fox students making their academic transition through the school’s Center for Undergraduate Advising.

Learn more about Rodriguez, and the Fox Online MBA and Online BBA programs by reading the full story at usnews.com.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Let’s be honest: There are many excruciatingly dull business podcasts. We won’t name names, but if you’ve spent time exploring the Podcasts app, you know what we mean. Don’t be discouraged, because there are also several awesome business podcasts worth listening to if you’re seeking inspiring and informative discussions with some of the leading business minds of today. Check out the five below and get ready to learn something new and have fun doing it.

5. Planet Money

With nearly 800 episodes since its debut in 2008, Planet Money’s a fantastic resource if you want to take a deep dive into significant historical and current economic issues and the world of international business. Recent episodes focused on robot phone scams and the inner financial workings of Google and state fairs.

Recommended episode:When Subaru Came Out

4. StartUp

Ever wonder what it’d be like to start a startup? This podcast’s for you. The first season documented the launch of the digital media company that founded the podcast itself, (the now very successful) Gimlet Media, and recent seasons had episodes focusing on specific entrepreneurs and startups. This podcast is now so popular ABC is creating a sitcom based on it, titled Alex, Inc., starring Zach Braff.

Recommended episode:Dear Music Fans

3. 30 for 30

ESPN recently launched the 30 for 30 podcast based on the award-winning documentary series with the same name. It’s not necessarily about business, but there are infinitely many lessons future business leaders can learn from the struggles, the glories, and the unstoppable fighting spirits of professional athletes.

Recommended episode:The Fighter Inside

2. Masters of Scale

Reid Hoffman, the cofounder and executive chairman of LinkedIn, hosts this podcast where he interviews some of the most interesting entrepreneurs of our time about the secrets of their success and the evolution of their careers. Former guests include Airbnb’s Brian Chesky, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, and Netflix’s Reed Hastings.

Recommended episode:Grit Happens

1. How I Built This

Hosted by Guy Raz, the editorial director of TED Radio Hour, How I Built This has spotlighted the innovators and entrepreneurs responsible for founding brands like VICE Media, Rolling Stone, Whole Foods, Kickstarter, Kendra Scott, and TOMS. Prepare to be inspired.

Recommended episode:Warby Parker

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

“How do I make the most of my college experience?” is a question every new college student ponders. Mary Tang, a senior majoring in accounting at the Fox School of Business, has answers.

Tang formerly served as the president of the Temple University chapter of Ascend, a Student Professional Organization (SPO) that fosters Pan-Asian leadership across industries, and she is currently the president of Beta Alpha Psi, the international honor society for accounting, finance, and information systems students.

Tang’s involvement in SPOs had a significant impact on her. After graduation next May, she’ll intern with KPMG, and then she plans to earn an MS in accountancy from Fox and become a Certified Public Accountant (CPA). But her longterm goal is to stay involved with SPOs.

“For a while,” Tang says, “I thought I wanted to be a partner at a public accounting firm, and I could end up doing that. But since I’ve been so involved with SPOs on campus, I’ve worked with a lot of recruiters, so I know the recruiting process for public accounting firms, which are very specific processes, and I’ve really enjoyed it. I’d love to work as a campus recruiter, for a campus organization, and help students in SPOs get internships and jobs. That would be really, really cool.”

From learning how to network with recruiters to becoming an SPO leader, Tang’s learned a ton about optimizing her college experience during her time at Fox and Temple. She shares this wisdom below.

5. Explore Philadelphia

“One thing students forget to do is explore the city,” says Lang. “Philadelphia is one of the best cities in the country and in the world, so it’s important to learn all the history behind it. There’s so much to do, not just in Center City, but many other parts of the city, too. I’m a lot busier now in my senior year, but freshman year is when you have the most time, so new students should take advantage and get to know Philly. I love South Philly. And I’m always in Chinatown; I recommend people go out and have some bubble tea.”

4. Use SEPTA

“Not many students have a car on campus, so SEPTA is the best way to explore Philadelphia. You could Uber and Lyft everywhere, sure, but if you’re going to college in a city, you need to learn how to use that city’s public transportation. Learning how to navigate the subway, trolley, bus, and trains will prepare you for getting to interviews, go out to dinner with friends, or whatever you need to do.”

3. Network/Ask People to Grab Lunch or Coffee

“Friends, classmates, anybody. If you’re at a networking event and you meet someone who’s interesting, definitely grab their business card, but also ask if you can shoot them an email, and ask if they’d like to get together for lunch or coffee. Every time I’ve asked a professional this, they’ve said, ‘Yes.’ I’ve gone on about 15 lunch dates with different professionals. It pays off in the long run.”

2. Talk to the People You See Every Day

“If you walk by someone in the dorm, or the hallway, or you see them in class every day, become friends with them. For business students, learning how to talk to everyone is important. And maybe one day you’ll need their help, or they’ll need your help, so it’s good to become friends with as many people as possible. Start learning how to network by talking to the person next to you in class. Maybe they’ll help you get a job one day, but it’s more important to talk to them like a human and get to know them first.”

1. Become an SPO Leader

“I was perfectly content with being a member of SPOs, but when I learned about the success stories of leaders, I knew I had to join the leadership. The former president of Ascend really challenged me to do and try new things and this helped me learn new skills. That’s when I learned being a leader is a great way to influence people and make a big impact. I knew I wanted to become one, and I did.”

Learn more about the Fox School’s Undergraduate Programs and the Department of Accounting.
For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Grab your books—it’s time to go back to school!

Whether you’re an incoming freshman or a senior, the beginning of a semester is the perfect opportunity to make big plans and set challenging goals. It’s an excellent moment to try new things—so with this in mind, we asked rising senior Suchetha Subramaniam to offer a few tips that will help business students succeed.

Subramaniam is a double major in International Business and Spanish. She’s also the president of the College Council—the organization that oversees nearly 30 student professional organizations (SPOs) at the Fox School—and she recently completed her fourth internship in a financial advisory program with Merrill Lynch. Subramaniam’s long-term career goal, she says, is to “work in the financial advisory space, with an international nonprofit specializing in business development in Latin or South America.”

From risk-taking to strategic networking, here are some of the secrets that have helped Subramaniam find success during her time at Fox.

5. Join Student Professional Organizations

“Joining an SPO is the best way to get into the business world as a student,” says Subramaniam. “They’re a great way to network yourself and to network your abilities, to learn about possible career paths, and to speak to professors. I’ve had a lot of opportunities to interact with many top performing students and these relationships will help me in the future. I got some of the best work experience I never would’ve gotten otherwise through SPOs.”



4. Take Professional Risks

“When I came to Temple, I knew Fox was a highly-esteemed school and I knew that the discipline of business is broad enough that I’d find my niche in due time. I had no background in finance, but all of a sudden I decided to apply for a financial advising internship with Merrill Lynch. It was very challenging for me, but I realized finance is a field I can truly see myself working in. I never would’ve discovered this passion if I hadn’t taken a risk and been willing to try something new.”

3. Talk to Your Professors

“Professors all have office hours and you should take advantage of that. Professors are incredibly intelligent and experienced, and they are great people who want you to succeed. All you have to do is make an effort and show them you’re a curious, functioning person with feelings and they’ll reciprocate. One of my professors even put me in touch with someone in her personal circle and this helped me get an interview I otherwise wouldn’t have had. Talking to professors can open up so many new opportunities. It pays off. And they’re such nice, knowledgeable people, so why wouldn’t you want to get to know them?”

Suchetha Subramaniam meets Colin Powell.

2. Go to Events You Normally Wouldn’t Attend

“Last year, Fox played a part in bringing Colin Powell to campus. I had no intention of going; I saw the flyer, I saw the invite, but didn’t think much of it. But I was pushed by some faculty to go because it was a once in a lifetime experience. I was able to speak to Powell individually, and I got a picture taken with him. He’s one of the most influential people in our recent political history, so that was really cool. His speech was on leadership and inclusion, and it was incredible. He was so inspiring and there were so many things I took away from it that I can apply to my future and to different leadership roles.”

1. Network, Network, Network

“On day one at Fox, they had us go to a networking event with faculty, the deans, and other students—they literally threw us right in the deep end. We’ve all heard it a million times: ‘It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.’ That’s so true in every facet of life and your professional career. At Fox and Temple, we have all these interesting people around us who are doing and will go on to do great things; we’re all on the same trajectory, but working in different fields. I see networking like a plant, where you’re the main branch and each person you know branches off into a different one. But once you make a connection, you have access to their network as well, and this opens up new paths for you.”

Learn more about the Fox School’s International Business program.
For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.
Rory Phalon
Rory Phalon

Entrepreneurship, a pillar at Temple University, continues to flourish campus-wide.

Adding to that robust culture, a recently forged student professional organization is helping to strengthen Temple’s ties to entrepreneurship. The Temple University Venture Club (TUVC) is the latest extension of entrepreneurial support offered to students, and offers students opportunities to learn about entrepreneurial finance and venture investing.

In starting the entrepreneurship-focused organization, Fox School of Business senior Rourke Phalon set out to create a space that is for fellow business-minded individuals, whether or not they are business majors.

“The most rewarding part about guiding student entrepreneurs is helping them tap into opportunities that no one had made available to me as an underclassman,” said Phalon, an International Business major from Watertown, Conn. “I had been an active member of student professional organizations dedicated to institutional finance and entrepreneurship, but there was this interesting world which blended both that needed more attention brought to it. I helped form the club to fill that gap.”

While entrepreneurial thinking is mainly associated within the Fox School, TUVC hopes to foster growth and innovation among all Temple students. According to Zachary Scheffer, the Venture Club’s vice president, the organization seeks to help students who may not know where to begin when launching a business or venture.

“We encourage all backgrounds to join our organization because if you have an entrepreneur’s mindset, you may need information regarding funding one day,” said Scheffer. “We currently have a few members from outside of Fox that find great value in the opportunities and information TUVC provides.”

For Phalon, serving as president of a new organization with more than 20 members is no easy feat. But, he said, seeing students grow and take advantage of new opportunities through other startups has made the journey worth it.

“The overall mission of the Venture Club is to create a culture around entrepreneurial finance at Temple,” he said. “We accomplish that goal by hosting an entrepreneurship speaker series, and by making students aware of networking, volunteer, and work opportunities in the entrepreneurship space.”

Venture Club is the latest edition to Temple’s entrepreneurship-rich landscape. Temple University Entrepreneurship Academy (TUEA), launched in Fall 2016, already has begun expanding the university’s widespread entrepreneurial culture by incorporating entrepreneurship education into coursework delivered by faculty members throughout all of Temple’s 17 schools and colleges.

TUEA is an extension of Temple’s renowned Innovation and Entrepreneurship Institute, which uses applied, hands-on learning and access to entrepreneurs and mentors to proactively promote entrepreneurial spirit for students from all disciplines.

While the Temple Venture Club is still young, the organization’s corporate relations officer Courtney Mangano envisions a bright future for TUVC.

“I hope the Venture Club continues to act as a platform for anyone looking to gain experience on how to successfully become involved in the startup and venture capital community, get an internship, and network with our influential guest speakers,” said Mangano.

Dan GenuarioDan Genuario is on a mission to capture Philadelphia one frame at a time.

The senior Management Information Systems major at Temple University’s Fox School of Business is using his creativity to showcase the beauty in the abandoned. His photography hobby has turned into a passion, and is opening up doors to his potential future.

Three years ago, Genuario used his cell phone camera to start taking pictures of graffiti and architecture around the city. He noticed his father had a digital camera that he never used and, one day, decided to pick it up and start shooting.

“I’m self-taught, but I like to credit my abilities to my friends. I learn a lot from their feedback, everything from how to shoot to post-processing,” Genuario said.

Genuario has found a community while hunting for rundown and abandoned areas to photograph. His adventures have taken him to a variety of landscapes, including dilapidated warehouses and asylums that date back to the 19th century.

After sharing his work with the Saxby’s Coffee shop on Temple’s campus this summer, the shop decided to showcase a piece in its newly remodeled space. The photograph that hangs on the wall is the exquisitely captured interior of a deserted water treatment plant from the 1930s.

“It was so photogenic and such beautiful architecture,” he said. “I’ve never seen anything quite like that place.”

After exhausting most of the vacant properties in and around Philadelphia, Genuario decided it was time to expand his portfolio. This past summer, he combined his loves of travel and photography into several road trips with friends.

“We went to the Midwest, down south, and up to New England to branch out more,” he said.

Genuario’s work also has appeared in several shows throughout the city, at places like the Trocadero Theatre and Goldilocks Gallery. A dedicated student, he was offered other art shows, but declined due to his schoolwork. “I have to find the right balance between school and photography,” he explained. “I don’t want to give up my passion of photography for school, but at the same time I want to graduate.”

Genuario said he’s “still trying to figure it out,” with regard to his career choices, but said he’d ideally like to apply the information technology and business management skills he’s honed at the Fox School with the potential launch of a photography business.

“I can have a good career with my major and eventually retire to pursue photography,” Genuario said. “I would love to travel the world and take photos.”

Dan Genuario photo 2Dan Genuario photo 1Dan Genuario photo 3

The undergraduate accounting program at Temple University’s Fox School of Business improved 17 places to earn a No. 30 national ranking, and is ranked No. 9 among programs of similar size, according to new rankings released by the Public Accounting Report.

The Public Accounting Report (PAR) also ranked Fox’s Master of Accountancy (MAcc) program No. 40 in the United States.

The PAR 35th annual Professors Survey, published August 2016, is the nation’s only survey that allows accounting professors to rank the nation’s best accounting programs. According to the PAR, hundreds of professors from the nation’s top colleges and universities participated in this year’s survey, which was conducted in April.

At the undergraduate level, the Fox School’s accounting program jumped 17 places from last year’s ranking to enter the PAR’s top 30. Among programs with between 16 and 21 full-time faculty, Fox is ranked No. 9 in the nation – an improvement of nine spots from the PAR’s 2015 report.

Fox’s MAcc program is ranked No. 1 in the Greater Philadelphia region, and No. 12 in the nation among programs of its size, according to the PAR.

“These rankings are pleasing facts, since the PAR rankings are compilations of accounting professors’ opinions,” said Dr. Eric Press, Chairman of the Fox School’s Department of Accounting. “These rankings reflect the esteem with which colleagues at other business schools hold our program.”

The Department of Accounting is the largest at Temple’s Fox School of Business, with more than 1,200 students enrolled across undergraduate, masters, and PhD programs. It is home to 21 full-time and 18 part-time faculty.

Students within the MAcc program have achieved a 96-percent job placement rate in public accounting positions within three months of graduate, since the program’s launch in 2011. MAcc students boast a 70-percent CPA exam pass rates, far exceeding the Uniform CPA Examination Passing Rates, and more than half of Fox MAcc graduates attain job placements at one of the Big Four accounting firms.

“The MAcc program’s inclusion in Public Accounting Report’s ranking demonstrates our place as the best in the region, and as one of the leading programs in the nation,” said Sheri Risler, Fox MAcc program director. “It’s also recognition of our continued growth and sustained excellence dating to 2011, when our program was founded.”

Temple University’s Fox School of Business is ranked among the top-50 business schools in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report.

The Fox School earned a No. 48 national ranking in U.S. News’ 2017 edition of “Best Colleges,” placing it among the top-10 percent of all undergraduate business programs in the United States. The ranking, the highest in the Fox School’s history, marks a 13-spot surge since last year’s U.S. News ranking.

“The Fox School continues to ascend the rankings of prestigious publications like U.S. News,” said Dean M. Moshe Porat. “It’s a tremendous accomplishment to have been ranked among the top-50 business schools in the country, and it serves as testament to the quality of our programs.”

The business school rankings featured in the 2017 edition of “Best Colleges,” which were released online Sept. 13, are based on peer assessment of deans and senior faculty at each AACSB-accredited undergraduate business program in the United States over a two-year period, including a Spring 2016 survey.

“Our innovative approach to business education is at the core of the Fox School story, which we’ve been working hard to disseminate to our industry colleagues and peers,” said Fox School Vice Dean Debbie Campbell. “This ranking only helps to reinforce and validate our pursuit of continual improvement.”

For the fourth consecutive year, three of Fox’s undergraduate programs earned top-15 rankings from U.S. News. Risk Management and Insurance (No. 6), International Business Administration (No. 13), and Management Information Systems (No. 14) programs all are among the best of their kind in the nation.

Fox’s Risk Management and Insurance program is the nation’s oldest, continuously running program of its kind. Among the largest programs in the country, too, Fox’s Risk Management and Insurance program is also home to the Sigma Chapter of Gamma Iota Sigma. The chapter, the international professional fraternity’s largest, has earned the Edison L. Bowers award as best overall chapter in 18 of the last 23 years.

Fox’s International Business Administration program is supported by a robust study-abroad program, through Fox and Temple University, as well as from the Institute of Global Management Studies and the Temple Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER), which are based at Fox. Temple CIBER is one of only 17 such elite centers in the nation to have had its grant-renewal proposal approved for federal funding from the United States Department of Education. Temple is the only university in Pennsylvania to have received federal funding for CIBER.

Management Information Systems (MIS) is a global leader in transformative research on the design, use, and effects of information technology. MIS faculty ranked No. 1 in the world in research output, according to the University of Texas at Dallas’ Top 100 Business School Research ranking. Members of Fox’s Association for Information Systems (AIS) student chapter, the first of its kind, have earned first place in four consecutive years at the AIS Student Leadership Conference.

The Fox School of Business is the largest and most-comprehensive business school in the Philadelphia region, with more than 8,500 students, 200 faculty, and 65,000 alumni worldwide. Fox offers 15 undergraduate majors; more than 20 student professional organizations; the Fox Honors program; cutting-edge technology and stellar student services, including a Business Communications Center and the Center for Student Professional Development (CSPD), which has a 94-percent job-placement rate for undergraduates who use its services.

Fox School of Business student Robert Moses accepts the trophy for winning the Penn State Abington Business Challenge, shaking hands with Dr. Manohar Singh, division head for social sciences at Penn State Abington.
Fox School of Business student Robert Moses accepts the trophy for winning the Penn State Abington Business Challenge, shaking hands with Dr. Manohar Singh, division head for social sciences at Penn State Abington.
A team of students from Temple University culled its business and information technology savvy to take first place in the Penn State Abington Business Challenge.

The team – composed of Robert Moses and Nicole Cirillo from the Fox School of Business, and Nick Carmen from the College of Science and Technology (CST) – claimed the $1,000 first prize and bested eight other finalists when it delivered its winning presentation April 2 at Penn State University’s Abington campus.

Temple’s team was one of 200 invited to compete in the Penn State Abington Business Challenge, a case competition in which students solved a complex business issue by providing strategic solutions for a company within the IT healthcare industry.

The Temple trio emerged from the stacked field of finalists by providing quantified recommendations and implementations, based upon six years of historical financial figures provided to each team.

“From an analytical standpoint, we went beyond this singular company and identified trends and drivers within the industry, which I believe differentiated us from our competitors,” said Moses, a Business Management major who graduated in May. “By providing more than a high-level overview, we also created a forward-looking table to account for our recommendations and expenses, and forecasted the potential revenue.”

Fox School of Business student Robert Moses poses with the first-place trophy after he and his team won the Penn State Abington Business Challenge.
Fox School of Business student Robert Moses poses with the first-place trophy after he and his team won the Penn State Abington Business Challenge.
Dr. Manohar Singh, division head for social sciences at Penn State Abington, and the competition’s organizer, later revealed the name of the unidentified company as the Greater Philadelphia-based MRO Corporation, which delivers health information management and technology systems built to safeguard confidential information. Steve Hynes, MRO’s chief executive officer, served as one of the competition’s five judges.

“It was an interesting exercise for the students – researching, forming hypotheses, and defending them,” Hynes said. “I was impressed that the students put in so much effort and leveraged the strengths of their teammates.”

Temple’s team delivered highly efficient and effective solutions for MRO Corporation’s desired growth within its particular marketplace. Teams from Swarthmore College and Shippensburg University placed second and third, respectively.

For Cirillo, a Business Management major who graduated in May, the case competition provided an opportunity to learn from other competitors.

“This was an interesting experience because it exposed us to the analyses completed by our competitors,” she said. “It was eye-opening to see students from other schools run their analysis completely differently, using the same figures, and it was great to represent Temple and win first place.”