The media’s buzzing this year about the coming artificial intelligence revolution and how it will impact U.S. jobs. Robots of varying shapes and sizes have graced the covers of nearly every business and technology publication, and experts are weighing in on the threats and opportunities.

But there has been little discussion in popular media about how AI and automation will impact emerging markets. To learn more about the issue, we spoke with Bertrand Guillotin, the Fox School’s International Business program’s academic director and an assistant professor of instruction.

Fox’s International Business program was recently ranked No. 1 in North America and No. 2 in the world for research by the University of Texas, Dallas Business School Research Rankings, and it is one of the Top 15 International Business programs according to U.S. News & World Report. The program’s research is published in the Journal of International Business Studies, and it includes three Academy of International Business (AIB) fellows (Charles Dhanaraj, Masaaki Kotabe, and Ram Mudambi).

Since one of the hot research topics in international business today is the rise of automation and how emerging markets are positioning themselves for it, we asked Guillotin to share some insight.

Is there a particular emerging market you find especially interesting, in that it exemplifies some of the big changes happening with the global economy?

Take China, for example, because there are widespread changes happening there. The economy is trying to get away from an export based model; they are trying to change to a consumption based, more robust national economy. They have to be leaders in all kinds of industries to do that, including green technologies—though they are the number one global polluter—and they have to be strong in all the value-added industries. If you look at Dalian Wanda, which purchased AMC Theaters a few years ago, they are strong in entertainment and real estate; they understand the importance of diversification in our global economy.

There has been a lot of recent talk about how AI and automation will impact the U.S. workforce, but we don’t hear much about how other countries, like China, are responding to this possibility.

China could lose 50% of their manufacturing jobs in the foreseeable future, maybe the next 10 years, due to automation and AI. If you talk to partners at KPMG, who are responsible for forecasting what trends are going to catch traction beyond the hype, they’ll tell you it’s still too expensive to put AI and automation in place on a large scale. It’s happening, yes, but it’s not impacting all the jobs the same way. Low-skill jobs will be automated, and we’ve been doing that for centuries already. We do things on a daily basis that are not value-added, but if those things are automated, we benefit because we can focus our brain power on something else. It is a huge question for China, because if they automate too many jobs, they may destroy their national economy. But I don’t think they’ll do that. The cost-benefit analysis has to be made and they will make it.

Is AI and automation a popular topic for international business students?

Yes, issues like this are what make our International Business program very attractive. We have these discussions and we reconcile the different positions. We explain what they need to know to be successful in a world that’s always changing very quickly. We launched the International Business minor last year and we’re now attracting students from six different colleges at Temple, including liberal arts, science and technology, media and communication, and so on. We’re expecting more than 100 students in the minor this year. It’s an exciting time to study international business and our increased enrollment and rankings show that.

For our students, we need to be very clear that they need to keep working hard to stay on top of the game. Beyond their degrees, and beyond graduation, they need to keep educating themselves and keep acquiring skills that cannot be automated. If you stay on top of your skill requirements and continue to train and grow and learn, even if you are in manufacturing, you can survive. But if you just look at the status quo and think the U.S. has been on top of the global economy for decades and that will never change, that’s not going to work. The U.S. has a good chance to stay competitive, but we have to be serious and work together.

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Temple University’s Fox School of Business is ranked among the top-50 business schools in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report.

The Fox School earned a No. 48 national ranking in U.S. News’ 2017 edition of “Best Colleges,” placing it among the top-10 percent of all undergraduate business programs in the United States. The ranking, the highest in the Fox School’s history, marks a 13-spot surge since last year’s U.S. News ranking.

“The Fox School continues to ascend the rankings of prestigious publications like U.S. News,” said Dean M. Moshe Porat. “It’s a tremendous accomplishment to have been ranked among the top-50 business schools in the country, and it serves as testament to the quality of our programs.”

The business school rankings featured in the 2017 edition of “Best Colleges,” which were released online Sept. 13, are based on peer assessment of deans and senior faculty at each AACSB-accredited undergraduate business program in the United States over a two-year period, including a Spring 2016 survey.

“Our innovative approach to business education is at the core of the Fox School story, which we’ve been working hard to disseminate to our industry colleagues and peers,” said Fox School Vice Dean Debbie Campbell. “This ranking only helps to reinforce and validate our pursuit of continual improvement.”

For the fourth consecutive year, three of Fox’s undergraduate programs earned top-15 rankings from U.S. News. Risk Management and Insurance (No. 6), International Business Administration (No. 13), and Management Information Systems (No. 14) programs all are among the best of their kind in the nation.

Fox’s Risk Management and Insurance program is the nation’s oldest, continuously running program of its kind. Among the largest programs in the country, too, Fox’s Risk Management and Insurance program is also home to the Sigma Chapter of Gamma Iota Sigma. The chapter, the international professional fraternity’s largest, has earned the Edison L. Bowers award as best overall chapter in 18 of the last 23 years.

Fox’s International Business Administration program is supported by a robust study-abroad program, through Fox and Temple University, as well as from the Institute of Global Management Studies and the Temple Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER), which are based at Fox. Temple CIBER is one of only 17 such elite centers in the nation to have had its grant-renewal proposal approved for federal funding from the United States Department of Education. Temple is the only university in Pennsylvania to have received federal funding for CIBER.

Management Information Systems (MIS) is a global leader in transformative research on the design, use, and effects of information technology. MIS faculty ranked No. 1 in the world in research output, according to the University of Texas at Dallas’ Top 100 Business School Research ranking. Members of Fox’s Association for Information Systems (AIS) student chapter, the first of its kind, have earned first place in four consecutive years at the AIS Student Leadership Conference.

The Fox School of Business is the largest and most-comprehensive business school in the Philadelphia region, with more than 8,500 students, 200 faculty, and 65,000 alumni worldwide. Fox offers 15 undergraduate majors; more than 20 student professional organizations; the Fox Honors program; cutting-edge technology and stellar student services, including a Business Communications Center and the Center for Student Professional Development (CSPD), which has a 94-percent job-placement rate for undergraduates who use its services.

Exterior photo of Alter HallThe Fox School of Business at Temple University will introduce new academic programs for the 2016-17 academic year.

A Bachelor of Science program in Statistical Science and Data Analytics headlines the new offerings by the Fox School, and joins two undergraduate minors in Leadership and International Business Administration.

At the graduate level, students can elect for MBA concentrations in either Business Analytics or Enterprise Risk Management. In Fall 2016, Fox also will launch a Master of Science degree program in Business Analytics.

“The addition of new programs and concentrations demonstrate our reputation as one of the nation’s most-comprehensive business schools,” said Dr. M. Moshe Porat, Dean of the Fox School of Business. “Employers and industry partners agree that these areas represent emerging fields and areas of study wherein professionals and leaders are in great demand, and we have the diverse, renowned faculty to answer the call of industry and these support programs.”

The undergraduate major in Statistical Science and Data Analysis will provide students with the ability to select, utilize and apply quantitative reasoning and data analytic skills to their future fields of study, according to program director Dr. Alexandra Carides, Associate Professor of Statistical Science.

The minor in International Business Administration incorporates the nationally ranked curriculum of Fox’s undergraduate-degree program in International Business. The minor requires only four courses and four prerequisites, delivering the cornerstones of international business education while offering students the opportunity to complete a study-abroad trip in the process.

The minor in Leadership cultivates stronger interpersonal skills for effective management and leadership positions. With courses focusing on workplace demands for leadership from both the organizational and interpersonal points of view, the minor allows students to move beyond technical competence as they step into leadership roles in industry.

The MBA concentration in Business Analytics is designed to enable graduate students to use data and models to recognize opportunities and to improve organizational decision-making. “Data-driven decision-making has been shown to have large positive effects on outcomes of interest to organizations of all types,” said Assistant Professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management Dr. Eric Eisenstein, the concentration’s director. “Business Analytics concentrators will meet the growing demand for talent in the areas of managing, analyzing, predicting, and discovering insights from the complex data that is available to modern corporations.”

The MBA concentration in Enterprise Risk Management, offered by one of the most-prestigious Risk Management programs in the nation, will prepare MBA students to design and implement state-of-the-art processes that enhance and improve organizational strategic decision-making, how it manages risk across the enterprise, as well as improving traditional risk mitigation decisions. “This concentration will provide MBA candidates with the concepts and tools to develop advanced organizational risk management capabilities and pursue executive responsibility for managing enterprise-wide risks,” said Assistant Professor of Risk, Insurance, and Healthcare Management Dr. M. Michael Zuckerman, the concentration’s director.

All eligibility and declaration questions regarding the new undergraduate major and minors should be referred to Fox’s Center for Undergraduate Advising. Graduate students are encouraged to speak with their program advisors for more details about new curricula.

The International Business faculty at Temple University’s Fox School of Business have earned prominent national and global rankings for research output.

According to the University of Texas at Dallas’ Top 100 Business School Research Rankings, Fox School’s International Business faculty rank No. 3 in the United States and No. 6 in the world for research productivity for publications in the Journal of International Business Studies over a four-year period, from 2012-2015. Fox shared its global ranking with Australian National University, which received an identical score.

“This is a proud moment for the International Business faculty at the Fox School of Business,” said Dr. Arvind Parkhe, Chair of Fox’s Strategic Management department, which houses the International Business program. “International Business is one of Dean M. Moshe Porat’s strategic pillars and one of Fox’s historic core strengths. Exceptional, research-active faculty and doctoral students continue to add to our growing reputation as a leader in this area.”

UT Dallas has published its Top 100 Business School Research Rankings since 1990. The rankings assess research contributions based on publications in the world’s 24 leading academic journals and across all major business disciplines. Schools receive full-point scores for research papers produced by single authors, according to the ranking’s methodology, with schools receiving fractions of a point for papers that feature multiple authors.

This marks the second time that Fox’s International Business faculty have earned a top-5 ranking for research productivity. Previously, Asia Pacific Journal of Management has ranked the program No. 3 in the U.S. and No. 4 in the world for research output.

In September, U.S. News & World Report ranked the Fox School’s International Business undergraduate program among the nation’s top-15 such AACSB-accredited programs for the fourth consecutive year.

Three Fox School of Business undergraduate programs – Risk Management and Insurance, International Business, and Management Information Systems (MIS) – again rank among the best in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report’s 2016 edition of Best Colleges.

The Fox School’s Risk Management and Insurance program ranks No. 5, marking three consecutive years that it has earned a top-5 ranking. International Business is No. 13, and MIS is ranked No. 14 in the country. This marks the third consecutive year in which three Fox undergraduate programs have been respectively ranked among the top-15 in the nation.

“It’s rewarding for the Fox School to once again be recognized among some of the nation’s finest undergraduate business programs, but we are not content,” said Dean M. Moshe Porat. “We are constantly introducing innovations to our programs and services to improve upon the exceptional business education we deliver, and to further enhance the value of a Fox degree.”

The business school rankings in the 2016 edition of Best Colleges, released online Sept. 9, are based on peer assessment of deans and senior faculty at each AACSB-accredited undergraduate business program in the U.S. over a two-year period, including a Spring 2015 survey.

The Fox School’s Risk Management and Insurance program is the nation’s oldest, continuously running program of its kind. Among the largest programs in the country, too, Fox’s Risk Management and Insurance program is also home to the Sigma Chapter of Gamma Iota Sigma. The chapter, the international professional fraternity’s largest, has earned the Edison L. Bowers award as best overall chapter in 18 of the last 23 years.

Fox’s International Business program is supported by a robust study-abroad program, through the school and Temple University, as well as from the Institute of Global Management Studies and the Temple Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER), which is based at Fox. Temple CIBER is one of only 17 such elite centers in the nation to have had its grant-renewal proposal approved for federal funding from the United States Department of Education. Temple is the only university in the Greater Philadelphia region and in Pennsylvania to have received funding for CIBER.

MIS’ research faculty rank No. 1 in the world in research output for a five-year period, from 2010-2014, according to the My Vision Research ranking and the University of Texas at Dallas Top 100 Business School Research ranking. Members of Fox’s Association for Information Systems (AIS) student chapter, the first ever, have earned first place in four consecutive years at the AIS Student Leadership Conference and IT Competition. Recently, Fox’s AIS was recognized as the 2015 Distinguished Chapter of the Year.

In all, the Fox School offers 15 undergraduate majors, more than 20 Student Professional Organizations, the Fox Honors program, cutting-edge technology and stellar student services, including a Business Communications Center and Center for Student Professional Development (CSPD), which has a 94-percent job-placement rate for undergraduates who use its services. The Fox School also offers an Online Bachelor of Business Administration, a degree-completion program in accounting, business management, legal studies or marketing.

Overall, the Fox School’s undergraduate business program is 61st in the nation out of 478 schools in this year’s ranking, placing it among the top-13 percent in the U.S.