A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty, staff, and students from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Busy People Make Healthier Choices

Thinking of yourself as a busy person can boost your self-control, according to research from Monica Wadhwa, associate professor of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, and her co-authors. Read more>>

Go Viral with the Right Audience

Yili Hong, PhD ’14, and Gordon Burtch, PhD ’13, study how companies can amplify customers’ influence over their peers by engineering content—and how targeting shared audiences is key. Read more>>

Crowdfunding Advice from an Expert

Why do GoFundMe campaigns like the one for Johnny Bobbitt go viral? Sunil Wattal, associate professor of MIS, weighs in on how distinctive campaigns stand out. Read more>> 

CBS3 Philly | September 21

Carvana, a car vending machine, is opening soon in Fishtown. Subodha Kumar says how this will affect purchase prices. Watch>>

Medium | September 18

What is it like to be a woman in business? Ellen Weber shares her insights into being a female leader, investor, and entrepreneur, and why Fox students stand out. Read more>>

IndyStar | September 16

Leora Eisenstadt discusses why racial slurs are having a moment of reckoning in today’s society, as people are being held to account for things that they did in the past, Read more>>

CBS3 Philly | September 6

Half of all American workers don’t take lunch breaks, according to Ravi S. Kudesia. He relays how mindfulness and work-breaks can help employees better manage their energy levels. Read more>>

BusinessBecause | September 4

Current MBA student Sandeep Gupta serves on the board of an India-focused NGO as part of the Fox Board Fellows program to learn more about corporate social responsibility. Read more>>

Asian Correspondant | September 12

Fox School’s partnership with Flinders University brings the best in global education methods and content to help students solve problems. Read more>>

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Peace has finally been brokered in a long-standing argument between two schools of thought in statistical science.

Research from Deep Mukhopadhyay, professor of statistical science, and Douglas Fletcher, a PhD student, was accepted for publication in Scientific Reports, a journal by Nature Research. Their research marks a significant step towards bridging the “gap” between two different schools of thought in statistical data modeling that has plagued statisticians for over 250 years.

“There are two branches of statistics: Bayesian and Frequentist,” says Mukhopadhyay. “There is a deep-seeded division, conceptually and operationally, between them.” The fundamental difference is the way they process and analyze the data. Bayesian statistics incorporates external domain-knowledge into data analysis via so-called “prior” distribution.

Subhadeep Mukhopadhyay

“Frequentists view ‘prior’ as a weakness that can hamper scientific objectivity and can corrupt the final statistical inference,” says Mukhopadhyay. “I could come up with ten different kinds of ‘prior’ if I asked ten different experts. Bayesians, however, view it as a strength to include relevant domain-knowledge into the data analysis.” This has been a disagreement in statistics over the last 250 years.

So, which camp is right? “In fact, both are absolutely right,” says Mukhopadhyay. In their paper, they argued that a better question to ask is, how can we develop a mechanism that incorporates relevant expert-knowledge without sacrificing the scientific objectivity?

The answer, Mukhopadhyay says, can ultimately help design artificial intelligence capable of simultaneously learning from both data and expert knowledge—a holy grail problem of 21st Century statistics and AI.

“The science of data analysis must include domain experts’ prior scientific knowledge in a systematic and principled manner,” Mukhopadhyay says. Their paper presents Statistical rules to judiciously blend data with domain-knowledge, developing a dependable and defensible workflow.

“That is where our breakthrough lies,” says Mukhopadhyay. “It creates a much more refined ‘prior,’ which incorporates the scientist’s knowledge and respects the data, so it’s a compromise between your domain expertise and what the data is telling me.”

Answering that question—when and how much to believe prior knowledge—offers dozens of real-world applications for Mukhopadhyay’s work. For example, healthcare companies can use apply this to new drugs by leveraging doctors’ expertise without being accused of cherry picking data for the sake of a speedy or unusually successful clinical trial.

Mukhopadhyay thanks Brad Efron of Stanford University, for inspiring him to investigate this problem. “It took me one and a half years to come up with the right question,” says Mukhopadhyay. “I believe Bayes and Frequentist could be a winning combination that is more effective than either of the two separately in this data science era.”

*This article corrects an earlier version by specifying that the research was published in Scientific Reports, a journal by Nature Research.

Learn more about Fox School Research.

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When looking for a new job, applicants typically consider a large number of organizations,looking for the right fit. Companies do the same, tending to hire job applicants who have similar attributes to those of their incumbents, all other things being equal.

In-Sue Oh, Brian Holtz, and You Jin Kim, three professors in the Fox School of Business’s Department of Human Resources Management, along with two other co-authors, studied why individuals are more likely to be attracted to, selected by, and stay longer in organizations that fit their personality. Their research explored this phenomenon, called the theory of attraction-selection-attrition (ASA), and found that organizations are becoming increasingly homogenous over time.

Their new study examines how different personality traits contribute to ASA processes that promote within‐organization homogeneity and between-organization heterogeneity progression over time. Their article, “Do Birds of a Feather Flock, Fly, and Continue to Fly Together? The Differential and Cumulative Effects of Attraction, Selection, and Attrition on Personality-Based Within-Organization Homogeneity and Between-Organization Heterogeneity Progression over Time,” was recently accepted for publication in the Journal of Organizational Behavior.

The ASA theory works on multiple levels: first, individuals tend to estimate, consciously or not, the extent of similarity between their own personality and the characteristics of potential employers. Because of this, people are attracted to organizations that best fit their personality and submit employment applications accordingly.

Next, the hiring managers reviewing the applications tend to favor and select those who they believe best fit the organizational characteristics, as well as those who are similar to their own personalities.

When newcomers join the organization, for the next several months up to one year, they evaluate the true fit between the organization and their personality. “People whohave a similar personality to that of their managers are more likely to have a higher chance of promotion. Those who don’t fit their managers’ personality are more likely to be unhappy,” says Oh. Newcomers who feel that they do not fit may decide to leave, this contributing to the level of attrition at the company.

In this study, the researchers tracked the personality profile changes and career trajectories of the employees of three South Korean companies from the manufacturing sector, the banking industry, and the pharmaceutical industry. The researchers used the five‐factor model (FFM) of personality traits—extraversion, conscientiousness, openness to experience, agreeableness and neuroticism—to determine the employee’s personality.

“Through the process of attraction, selection, and attrition, people at an organization become more homogeneous in terms of their personality,” says Oh. “We showed that through the reduction in the standard deviation in extraversion or other personality traits.”

The study was the first to examine this phenomenon of within‐organization homogeneity, or the similarity of employees’ personalities, over time. This study also examined between‐organization heterogeneity progression over time to see whether and how similar personalities within organizations contributes to inter-firm differences.

In viewing changes over time, the researchers found that selection is most responsible for the within‐organization homogenization, whereas attraction contributes most to between‐organization heterogeneity. In terms of personality traits, the progression of within-organization homogeneity over time was mostly driven by extraversion, but between-organization heterogeneity was influenced by neuroticism.

“Different organizations attract different people, select different people, and retain different people,” says Oh. “Because of that reduction in variance within organizations over time, organizations will become more different [from each other] over time, even within the same sector.”

Overall, this study provides an inside look at how personality functions as human capital resources within organizations and how personalities are unevenly distributed across organizations. This study extends Oh’s previous research on the impact of personality-based human capital resources on firm-level labor productivity and financial performance.

In today’s world, as more companies turn to artificial intelligence and technology to help screen for applicants, understanding the types of employees that are attracted to and will stay with a company are invaluable to human resource managers. By understanding how these processes work over time, the researchers also share insights in terms of human resource management practices.  

Learn more about research from the Fox School on the Idea Marketplace.

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A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty, staff, and students from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Are You Suffering From Too Many Choices?
More doesn’t always mean merrier. USA Today cites research by Center for Neural Decision Making director Angelika Dimoka that shows how fewer choices lead to happier consumers and more sales.

Twins, Triplets Taking Over Temple
A whopping 36 sets of twins and triplets—including Fox students—have arrived.

6 Things to Do When You’re Angry at Work
Deanna Geddes shares tips with Business Insider.

From Wall Street Exec to High School Teacher?
This Fox alum left Goldman Sachs to teach at Northeast High.

Warning: Your Personal Data Is Not Safe
The New York Times talks corporate data breaches with Anthony Vance.

Disruption Coming to Philly’s Hotel Scene
Wesley S. Roehl discusses Comcast tower’s upcoming Four Seasons launch.

Dorm Room Decorating Tips
An entrepreneurship major shows off her dorm design chops.

International Business Schools are Thriving
Fox’s partnership with Australia’s Flinders University is highlighted.

eMoney, Temple Announce New Partnership
Cynthia Axelrod discusses the impact on financial planning education.

Marriott, Airbnb Selling Experiences, Too
People want activity curation and a room, says Elizabeth Barber.

Fox Launches New Women’s Leadership Series
Philly Mag shares details on the new Executive Education program.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and Instagram.

Augmented reality (AR) technology is one of the most exciting advancements of our time. It can  generate empathy and new perspectives by transporting people, sometimes literally, into the shoes of another person with no barriers in time or space. Not surprisingly, many industries are considering the technology’s potential to improve customer experience.

Using Technology to Enhance Customer Experience

The museum industry is among the pioneers who are embracing this opportunity. Museums are currently facing a period of financial stagnation, with costs and insurance premiums rising and government funds dwindling. Many are forced to delay projects, downsize exhibitions, and even lay off staff. Forward-thinking museums, though, are embracing new technologies that enable visitors to have deeper connections with exhibits.

For example, the Terracotta Warriors exhibit at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia was AR-enhanced, with visitors able to see more detailed representations of how the sculptures and weapons looked through their AR app. They also have a Virtual Reality Demonstration Space, an immersive VR zone where you can go inside the human body, tour the solar system, walk around Chernobyl, peek into a brain, and more.

Researchers at the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospital Management are studying how these new technologies can be best deployed in fields where consumers still crave authentic experiences.

AR and VR: Technological Innovation Creates New Research Space

While virtual reality is a fully immersive experience (think of the VR headsets and being transported to a simulated environment), augmented reality is simply an enhanced version of reality created by adding information (image, text, or effects) to real places or objects using a piece of technology.

Despite the extensive discussions around the applications of AR technology, little research has been done on what kind of immersive experiences are best to use on visitors. Zeya He, an STHM PhD student, alongside professors Laurie Wu and Robert Li, recently examined the impact of different types of AR enhancements. Their paper, “When art meets tech: The role of augmented reality in enhancing museum experiences and purchase intentions,” will be published this fall in Tourism Management.
He, Wu, and Li recruited more than 200 participants for their online study and gave them video simulations of an AR-enhanced scene. The video showed a museum scene with Vincent Van Gogh’s painting Starry Night Over the Rhône, testing visual and text animations on the painting itself: glimmering stars, reflections on the river, a couple strolling on the bank, and added verbal information. In some videos,  the museum environment was also augmented with a visual of gently rippling water, testing virtual alterations to the museum’s ambience.

The researchers wanted to see what the participants found most engaging: adding animation to the different aspects of the painting, adding text over the painting, or adjusting the “virtual presence” by making the museum environment match that of the painting.

Enhancing Reality vs. Depriving Imagination

Though we might expect the most AR-enhanced scenario to have been the most highly rated, participants liked the one with the additional text and added ambience the most. The participants said the animation of the painting itself felt too intrusive. “It seems that technology may sometimes help create meaningfulness and excitement, but it can also make you think less, become less engaged,” He explains. While environmental visual cues can improve connection with an art piece, visual enhancement of the actual object seems to deprive the viewer of the freedom of imagination. Participants felt that they could no longer appreciate the painting itself with the added technological visualization, but the added text actually helped guide their eye to aspects of the painting and deepened their understanding.  

Looking to the Future

Though doing the study online had certain benefits, such as eliminating other possible confounding factors, further research is needed to test the effects of different kinds of technological enhancements of the museum experience, especially real AR technology in real museum spaces. The effects and results may also differ depending on the context, and the type of museum or exhibit.

“[These] results can be used by museums directly to design their content, but we also need to continue doing research on how it is possible to balance the excitement that technology brings and the meaningfulness the museum is trying to create,” He says. “So, it is the degree of technological enhancements that really matters, how we design the technology really matters.”

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

In the research world, the emphasis on statistically significant research results is so strong that often the art of the research process gets left behind. Luckily, a team of researchers at the School of Sport, Tourism, and Hospitality Management (STHM) at Temple University recently offered a unique behind-the-scenes look at how they are advancing the commonly accepted research methods in their field.

Collaborative Self-Study: An Innovative Qualitative Research Method

Lead researcher Bradley Baker, PhD ‘17, found there was a lack of substantial progress in innovative methods, especially qualitative, in the sport management field. The antidote to this “lack of creativity, theoretical impact, and practical relevance” is to look past the traditional qualitative and quantitative approaches to embrace a novel way to do research: collaborative self-study.

Collaborative self-study, Baker explains, is a type of qualitative research where researchers study themselves and their own social environment, as opposed to traditional methods where the researcher is a separate, objective onlooker. While this method is still relatively new, it has already been embraced by similar fields, such as the sociology of sport. It provides a unique potential to break through barriers of access to data and research participants, while encouraging a deeper self-reflection by the researchers and strong collaboration between team members.

In their paper, “Collaborative self-study: Lessons from a study of wearable fitness technology and physical activity,” Baker and his co-authors—current STHM doctoral students Xiaochen Zhou and Anthony Pizzo; James Du, PhD ’17, and Professor Daniel Funk—use their experience with this method to advise future researchers on when and how it may provide additional, unique insights. Published in a special issue of the Sport Management Review focused on contemporary qualitative research methods, their paper gives an insider view on how the method worked in practice: “[researchers] ask research questions,” says Pizzo. “But the way we get at that data, that is the focus of this paper. It’s the story behind the story.”

Experiencing the Experiment

Seven sport management graduate students formed a research team to look into how collaborative self-study could be used as a research method. The team consisted of a mix of genders, ages, fitness levels, ethnicities, and professional backgrounds.

Each member received an Apple Watch to wear for one month to record their experiences, thoughts, and exercise levels in a daily journal. The team later shared their experiences in group discussions, identifying common themes found while interacting with the technology, such as social value and attention, influence on physical activity, and anxiety. The experiment gave them a deeper insight into using collaborative self-study as a research method, specifically the possible advantages and disadvantages.

Reflecting on Self-Study: Transparency, True Experience, and Teamwork

On the benefits side, the researchers stated their data had deeper insights and it was faster and more efficient to collect than traditional methods. By not having a barrier—physical, temporal, cultural, or otherwise—between themselves and participants, the researchers had a potentially unlimited, unfiltered data source. Additionally, discussing as a team provided an environment where they could further elaborate on their experiences, stimulate reflection in others, and bond. This collaborative discussion made the data insights more thorough than a simple content analysis of journals, as the researchers were able to clarify their experiences through reflecting on the experiences of others.  

However, breaking the barrier between researcher and participant, though innovative, brings up questions of ethics and validity of data, as well as privacy and data security.

“Objectivity is the dominant tradition,” Baker says, “but now things are changing. […] Even what research question you are asking is already breaking absolute objectivity. In all studies, but especially in self-study, you have to be very transparent in your role and your perspective, what biases get integrated in your data.”

In order to ensure data validity, the researchers combined the deep reflection of self-study and the collaborative aspect of using multiple voices to combat the assumed presence of unchallenged assumptions, or researcher “blind spots.” Another possible detraction of this method is the nature of collaborative work: the need to agree, compromise, and end up with a coherent narrative formed by many different voices. This is where in-depth discussion and making sure all voices were heard helped enhance the experience.

Though having pros and cons like any other research method, collaborative self-study gives unique insights into people’s lived experiences and should be considered a valid method in any researcher’s arsenal. “Our hope is that the current work provides a measure of guidance regarding key ethical issues, benefits, challenges, and opportunities inherent to the approach,” Baker says. “We encourage other researchers to consider the potential benefits of collaborative self-study for their own research.”

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Advice for entrepreneurs
Start-ups need boards of directors. But how do you go about constructing one? Fox’s Ellen Weber shares her thoughts in a guest column for Money Inc. Read more >>

A new policy at Lowe’s
Lowe’s has suspended its policy of checking receipts upon a customer’s exit of select stores in what the home improvement retail chain identifies as “high theft” areas. Fox’s Dr. Jeffrey Boles adds to the conversation in an interview with the Philadelphia Inquirer. Read more >>

Voice of opposition
The nation’s Evangelicals—supporters of President Trump—are voicing their displeasure with his policy on separating families at the border. Fox’s Dr. Kevin Fandl, who previously worked with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, speaks on the hot-button issue with Christian Science Monitor. Read more >>

Santa Clara Weekly
STHM’s Dr. Daniel Funk explains the difference between economic activity and economic impact, and what the Bay Area can expect from the 2018 College Football Playoff that is headed to San Francisco’s Levi’s Stadium. Read more >>

Bloomberg Law
A recent court ruling may alter how healthcare providers care for patients whose wishes are to withhold life-saving treatments. Fox’s Dr. Samuel D. Hodge explains in an interview with Bloomberg Law. Read more >>

The Temple News | June 13, 2018
The student newspaper profiles Fox’s Michael McCloskey, who co-owns a Fishtown establishment that brought together 40 Temple alumni and Victory Brewing cofounder Bill Covaleski—also a Temple alum. Read more >>

Philly Voice | June 21, 2018
How do professional athletes go about insuring their bodies? Fox’s Michael McCloskey weighs in during an interview with Philly VoiceRead more >>

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Huddle up
Are huddle rooms valuable to the learning process? Most academics agree, with collaboration space factoring greatly into construction plans for newer or renovating buildings on campuses. Fox’s Dr. Tony Petrucci incorporates breakout-room learning into his courses on leadership. His interview on the subject—and the related story—appears in the June edition of University Business. Read more >>

A captive audience
Temple University and the Fox School of Business are leading the way in captive insurance education, says Fox’s M. Michael Zuckerman. He explains how in a Q&A with Captive Insurance Times, which serves as cover story for the magazine’s May edition. Read more >>

Evaluating Philly’s travel appeal
For more on the city’s lure as a tourist destination, Philly Voice speaks with STHM’s Dr. Benjamin Altschuler, who leads the school’s MS in Travel & Tourism program. Read more >>

Al Dia | June 7, 2018
The immigrant population is a vital contributor to the Pennsylvania economy, according to a new report. Al Dia references related research work conducted by MBA students from the Fox School for the Greater Philadelphia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Read more >>

Scholastica | June 9, 2018
Fox’s Dr. Deanna Geddes and Leora Eisenstadt discuss in a Q&A their recent research paper, on how the legal system handles harassment and assault cases. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Where do gig workers thrive?
Part-time work can be found anywhere, but some U.S. cities are home to booming gig economies. Fox’s Dr. Paul Pavlou shares a few and provides context in a recent interview with U.S. News & World ReportRead more >>

Boles speaks with WHYY
A Philadelphia man’s experience at Lowe’s has the home improvement store reconsidering its policy of checking receipts upon a customer’s exit of select stores in what Lowe’s arbitrarily identifies as “high theft” areas. Fox’s Dr. Jeffrey Boles, a retail theft expert, offers his take. Read more >>

The future of STHM
STHM’s Dr. Jeremy Jordan joins the PHL Diversity podcast to discuss his professional and academic background, and offers insights on future of the school and its programs.  Listen >>

Diverse Issues in Higher Education | June 4, 2018
Fox senior vice dean Debbie Campbell shares the successes of Temple’s Military and Veteran Services Center. Read more >>

Philly Voice | May 31, 2018
Why do people cover their laptop cameras with Post-It notes? Seeking an answer, The Philly Voice speaks with Fox’s Dr. David Schuff for more on this cybersecurity topic. Read more >>

CBS 3 | May 30, 2018
The general manager of the Philadelphia 76ers is in hot water after being linked to scandalous tweets from anonymous, burner accounts. Fox’s Dr. Sunil Wattal explains how a Twitter account can leave digital signatures. Watch >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Nelson in NBC News
Less than half of the U.S. workforce uses all of its allotted vacation days, citing a need to stay in the office to maintain productivity. “You’re not doing anybody any favors if you give up your mental health for a job,” Fox’s Kate Nelson explains in an interview with NBC News. Read more >>

 “Roseanne” and social-media management
ABC acted swiftly to cancel the financially lucrative reboot of “Roseanne,” hours after racist tweets by the show’s star, Roseanne Barr, had been published. Fox’s Amy Lavin discusses social sentiment and reputation management through social media use during a live interview with Allan Loudell, of WDEL 101.7 FM in Delaware.

At Campbell’s, a change of the guard
In May, Campbell Soup Company CEO Denise Morrison retired suddenly. The move, says Fox’s Thomas Fung, signals an opportunity for Campbell’s to find a new top executive with the skills required for a digitized marketplace. He speaks with Philadelphia Business Journal. Read more >>

Al Dia | May 24, 2018
Entrepreneurship is thriving in the Latino and Jewish communities, necessitating a recent entrepreneurial summit hosted at the Fox School and moderated by Fox’s Ellen Weber. Read more >>

The Temple News | May 22, 2018
Players from Temple’s football team traveled recently to Japan to advance the sport overseas. The trip coincided with the recent research work by STHM’s Dr. Jeremy Jordan and Dr. Daniel Funk. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

The future of sport betting
Last week, a Supreme Court decision lifts a long-standing sport betting ban. STHM’s Dr. Joseph Mahan, whose research has explored the correlation between sport betting and fandom, speaks with Philly Voice and the Philadelphia Business Journal about this decision.

Tips for making mortgage payments
Need ways to pay off your mortgage more quickly? Fox’s Dr. Jonathan Scott serves as one of the experts with whom U.S. News & World Report speaks. Read more >>

Debating Article II of the Constitution
The National Constitution Center’s We The People podcast features Fox’s Dr. Kevin Fandl, in a discussion on President Trump’s executive power over immigration law. Listen >>

Philadelphia Business Journal | May 18, 2018
As printing company Ricoh turns its focus toward digital services, Fox’s Dr. Ram Mudambi explains what the future holds for a company pivoting from its traditional mission and vision. Read more >>

Philadelphia Business Journal | May 17, 2018
As the City of Philadelphia works toward reconciling a $27 million gap in its financial records, Fox’s Dr. Steven Balsam weighs in. Read more >>

Philadelphia Business Journal | May 17, 2018
A local beverage company plans to expand into East Coast grocery stores. For more on the deal and its specialty distribution strategy, PBJ speaks with Fox’s Dr. Susan Mudambi. Read more >>

Philadelphia Business Journal | May 10, 2018
Marriott soon will add a property in Marple Township, Delaware County—a Philadelphia suburb that STHM’s Dr. Wesley Roehl views as underserved. Read more >>

BusinessBecause | May 14, 2018
Kia Brinkley explains how the Fox MBA program helped land her a job at L’Oreal. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Pavlou in NBC News
Today, five-star reviews are practically the norm. What’s driving this trend? How can consumers navigate reviews to parse out good services from the bad? Fox’s Dr. Paul Pavlou, who has researched online reviews, speaks with NBC News. Read more >>

Profiling graduating seniors
For its commencement coverage, student newspaper The Temple News speaks with Fox’s Jannatul Naima and STHM’s Nikki Green, among other graduating seniors. Learn more about Jannatul’s and Nikki’s journeys to Temple—and their plans following graduation.

So…how does HBO make money?
Is HBO’s operating revenue entirely generated by subscriptions? Philly Voice wondered, and spoke with Fox’s Dr. Ram Mudambi for the answer. Read more >>

U.S. News & World Report | May 10, 2018
Annually, the average consumer loses more than $300 to bank fees. How can we curtail this unnecessary (and expensive) trend? Fox’s Dr. Jonathan Scott weighs in. Read more >>

Philadelphia Inquirer | May 7, 2018
Last week, Temple football players traveled to Japan to earn academic credits and champion their sport in an international setting. The trip also supports the research work of STHM’s Dr. Jeremy Jordan and Dr. Dan Funk on the establishment of an NCAA equivalent in Japan. Read more, from the Inquirer and Yahoo! Sports >>

BusinessBecause | May 3, 2018
The online business publication profiles a Fox MBA alumna who leverages her experience and education to start a marketing company. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

The academic year has drawn to an end, students have graduated, and campus is a little quieter. These moments are often the best times for reflection on the year behind—and what a successful year it has been!

Graduating with Distinction: Congratulations to the PhD and DBA Class of 2018

The Fox School’s PhD and Executive DBA programs have performed to high standards. The PhD program boasted eleven graduates in the Class of 2018. The PhD candidates have accepted opportunities to teach and conduct research in prestigious institutions around the world, from George Mason University in Virginia to the University of South Wales in Australia. The PhD program continues to produce students who graduate with publications in top-tier journals, such as The Accounting Review, MIS Quarterly, Journal of Applied Psychology, and more.

The Executive DBA program applauds the 20 business leaders who successfully defended their dissertations in the second-ever DBA cohort. These alumni are just one example of our commitment to research with impact, as these students return to industry, not just as leaders, but as thought-leaders, ready to apply theory and research to business problems. This upcoming September, the Fox School will continue to demonstrate its leadership in the field as we host the 2018 Engaged Management Scholarship Conference, the premier meeting of executive DBA programs in the world.

Achievements in Research: Faculty Honored with Prestigious Awards

The world-class faculty at the Fox School has brought significant pride with many awards and achievements in research this year. The Office of Research applauds individuals such as In-Sue Oh, who was twice awarded the William A. Owns Scholarly Achievement Award for his significant contributions to the fields of HR and organizational behavior; Ram Mudambi, whose paper was one of eight to be selected the impactful paper in international entrepreneurship by the Journal of International Business Studies; and Thilo Kunkel, who is a 2018 North American Society for Sport Management Research Fellow in recognition of his contributions and achievements in sport-related scholarship.

These are just a few of the school’s achievements in research this year. Congratulations to all of the faculty for their numerous publications, citations, paper downloads, and grant awards. Learn more about the Fox School’s research impact.

Engaging Thought Leaders: Notable Events Highlighting Research

Through the year, faculty, staff, and students at the Fox School have worked tirelessly to create impactful, exciting events to showcase research and encourage collaboration. This year, the school hosted its semesterly Young Scholars Interdisciplinary Forum and the PhD Paper Competition, in which doctoral students and junior faculty present research concepts and solicit feedback.

The school also demonstrated its position as a thought leader in events throughout the year. The Translational Research Center hosted the inaugural 2018 Editors’ Summit, a first-of-its-kind forum that brought together editors-in-chief of leading academic business journals across multiple disciplines to discuss driving real impact with business scholarship. The Frederic Fox Lecture Series brought business executive and alumnus David Schoch, MBA ’78, previous chairman and CEO of Ford China, to discuss the implications on China in the international economy.

Congratulations to the students, faculty, and staff of the Fox School’s research community for a successful academic year!

Learn more about Fox School Research.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Eisenstadt in WSJ
Combatting sexual harassment can be a greater challenge for small firms than for their larger counterparts, a recent survey shows. The Wall Street Journal speaks with Fox’s Leora Eisenstadt, an expert on employee discrimination and discriminatory behavior in the workplace. Read more >>

Tackling stress for college students
Free pizza, therapy dogs, and an appearance from a member of the Philadelphia Eagles? An event centered on managing stress, and organized by students in a business honors course led by Fox’s Dr. Crystal Harold, earns publicity from NBC 10. Watch >>

Axelrod on NBC 10
As graduation draws near, NBC 10 focuses on a challenge that college graduates face: Debt. Fox’s Cindy Axelrod explains financial planning and the value of a college degree on an individual’s career earnings potential. Watch >>

Temple runs Broad Street (again)
Once again, the Temple-wide Broad Street Run team—led by Fox’s Michael McCloskey—contributed to Gamma Iota Sigma’s annual charity of choice. NBC 10 profiles McCloskey and the team, and a Fox alum shares how in a Philadelphia Inquirer op-ed how the Broad Street Run is more than a 10-mile race.

Philly I-Day recognizes Porat
Philly I-Day, celebrating the city’s risk management and insurance industry, recognizes Fox School Dean Dr. M. Moshe Porat as recipient of the 2018 Franklin Award for his lifetime achievement in the field. Industry news service A.M. Best speaks with Porat. Watch >>

Temple Now | May 1, 2018
Did you know the first Fly in 4 student is a Fox accounting major? Justin Grothmann’s story appears in the university’s newsletter. Read more >>

Temple Now | May 1, 2018
Last week, Fox’s Dr. Ram Mudambi moderated a Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce event focusing on innovation. Mudambi’s related research work earns publicity in the university’s newsletter. Read more >>

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | May 1, 2018
The CEO of a Pittsburgh-area corporation turned down a sizable compensation package because it was less than what he had requested, then resigned. Fox’s Dr. Steven Balsam, who has studied executive compensation, shares his expertise. Read more >>

Business Insurance | May 1, 2018
Fox’s M. Michael Zuckerman weighs in on the intersection between the insurance industry, the organizations associated with the NRA, and the risks related to those associations. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

STHM prof in USA Today
You’re traveling. You arrive at the hotel, in an unfamiliar city, and your reservation is nowhere to be found. Now what? STHM’s Michael Sheridan offers insight in a recent interview with USA Today. Read more >>

Inside Higher Ed explores groupwork
Groupwork has long served as a staple of education. But can that experience be replicated within online programs? Experts in online learning, including Fox’s Dr. Darin Kapanjie, weigh in. Read more >>

What is eSport’s future?
Experts predict that the eSport professional gaming industry could exceed $1.5 billion in revenue in the next two years. Last week, STHM hosted a conference focused on the phenomenon, and Dr. Daniel Funk speaks with Technically Philly. Read more >>

Are small brands overtaking bigger ones?
Marketing and retail trends seem to indicate this is the case. Fox’s Thomas Fung shares his expertise with The Philly Voice, in its weekly ‘Infrequently Asked Questions’ segment. Read more >>

Philly Voice | April 26, 2018
STHM’s Dr. Thilo Kunkel shares his research findings on football player branding and social media followership with Philly Voice. The research also receives publicity in Forbes. On the subject of arena renovations, Kunkel weighs in with Syracuse University’s The Daily Orange student newspaper.

6 ABC | April 27, 2018
Why are gas prices on the rise? Will drivers experience relief soon? Fox’s Dr. Sherry Jarrell has the answer. Watch >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.