A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Where do gig workers thrive?
Part-time work can be found anywhere, but some U.S. cities are home to booming gig economies. Fox’s Dr. Paul Pavlou shares a few and provides context in a recent interview with U.S. News & World ReportRead more >>

Boles speaks with WHYY
A Philadelphia man’s experience at Lowe’s has the home improvement store reconsidering its policy of checking receipts upon a customer’s exit of select stores in what Lowe’s arbitrarily identifies as “high theft” areas. Fox’s Dr. Jeffrey Boles, a retail theft expert, offers his take. Read more >>

The future of STHM
STHM’s Dr. Jeremy Jordan joins the PHL Diversity podcast to discuss his professional and academic background, and offers insights on future of the school and its programs.  Listen >>

Diverse Issues in Higher Education | June 4, 2018
Fox senior vice dean Debbie Campbell shares the successes of Temple’s Military and Veteran Services Center. Read more >>

Philly Voice | May 31, 2018
Why do people cover their laptop cameras with Post-It notes? Seeking an answer, The Philly Voice speaks with Fox’s Dr. David Schuff for more on this cybersecurity topic. Read more >>

CBS 3 | May 30, 2018
The general manager of the Philadelphia 76ers is in hot water after being linked to scandalous tweets from anonymous, burner accounts. Fox’s Dr. Sunil Wattal explains how a Twitter account can leave digital signatures. Watch >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Nelson in NBC News
Less than half of the U.S. workforce uses all of its allotted vacation days, citing a need to stay in the office to maintain productivity. “You’re not doing anybody any favors if you give up your mental health for a job,” Fox’s Kate Nelson explains in an interview with NBC News. Read more >>

 “Roseanne” and social-media management
ABC acted swiftly to cancel the financially lucrative reboot of “Roseanne,” hours after racist tweets by the show’s star, Roseanne Barr, had been published. Fox’s Amy Lavin discusses social sentiment and reputation management through social media use during a live interview with Allan Loudell, of WDEL 101.7 FM in Delaware.

At Campbell’s, a change of the guard
In May, Campbell Soup Company CEO Denise Morrison retired suddenly. The move, says Fox’s Thomas Fung, signals an opportunity for Campbell’s to find a new top executive with the skills required for a digitized marketplace. He speaks with Philadelphia Business Journal. Read more >>

Al Dia | May 24, 2018
Entrepreneurship is thriving in the Latino and Jewish communities, necessitating a recent entrepreneurial summit hosted at the Fox School and moderated by Fox’s Ellen Weber. Read more >>

The Temple News | May 22, 2018
Players from Temple’s football team traveled recently to Japan to advance the sport overseas. The trip coincided with the recent research work by STHM’s Dr. Jeremy Jordan and Dr. Daniel Funk. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

The future of sport betting
Last week, a Supreme Court decision lifts a long-standing sport betting ban. STHM’s Dr. Joseph Mahan, whose research has explored the correlation between sport betting and fandom, speaks with Philly Voice and the Philadelphia Business Journal about this decision.

Tips for making mortgage payments
Need ways to pay off your mortgage more quickly? Fox’s Dr. Jonathan Scott serves as one of the experts with whom U.S. News & World Report speaks. Read more >>

Debating Article II of the Constitution
The National Constitution Center’s We The People podcast features Fox’s Dr. Kevin Fandl, in a discussion on President Trump’s executive power over immigration law. Listen >>

Philadelphia Business Journal | May 18, 2018
As printing company Ricoh turns its focus toward digital services, Fox’s Dr. Ram Mudambi explains what the future holds for a company pivoting from its traditional mission and vision. Read more >>

Philadelphia Business Journal | May 17, 2018
As the City of Philadelphia works toward reconciling a $27 million gap in its financial records, Fox’s Dr. Steven Balsam weighs in. Read more >>

Philadelphia Business Journal | May 17, 2018
A local beverage company plans to expand into East Coast grocery stores. For more on the deal and its specialty distribution strategy, PBJ speaks with Fox’s Dr. Susan Mudambi. Read more >>

Philadelphia Business Journal | May 10, 2018
Marriott soon will add a property in Marple Township, Delaware County—a Philadelphia suburb that STHM’s Dr. Wesley Roehl views as underserved. Read more >>

BusinessBecause | May 14, 2018
Kia Brinkley explains how the Fox MBA program helped land her a job at L’Oreal. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Pavlou in NBC News
Today, five-star reviews are practically the norm. What’s driving this trend? How can consumers navigate reviews to parse out good services from the bad? Fox’s Dr. Paul Pavlou, who has researched online reviews, speaks with NBC News. Read more >>

Profiling graduating seniors
For its commencement coverage, student newspaper The Temple News speaks with Fox’s Jannatul Naima and STHM’s Nikki Green, among other graduating seniors. Learn more about Jannatul’s and Nikki’s journeys to Temple—and their plans following graduation.

So…how does HBO make money?
Is HBO’s operating revenue entirely generated by subscriptions? Philly Voice wondered, and spoke with Fox’s Dr. Ram Mudambi for the answer. Read more >>

U.S. News & World Report | May 10, 2018
Annually, the average consumer loses more than $300 to bank fees. How can we curtail this unnecessary (and expensive) trend? Fox’s Dr. Jonathan Scott weighs in. Read more >>

Philadelphia Inquirer | May 7, 2018
Last week, Temple football players traveled to Japan to earn academic credits and champion their sport in an international setting. The trip also supports the research work of STHM’s Dr. Jeremy Jordan and Dr. Dan Funk on the establishment of an NCAA equivalent in Japan. Read more, from the Inquirer and Yahoo! Sports >>

BusinessBecause | May 3, 2018
The online business publication profiles a Fox MBA alumna who leverages her experience and education to start a marketing company. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

The academic year has drawn to an end, students have graduated, and campus is a little quieter. These moments are often the best times for reflection on the year behind—and what a successful year it has been!

Graduating with Distinction: Congratulations to the PhD and DBA Class of 2018

The Fox School’s PhD and Executive DBA programs have performed to high standards. The PhD program boasted eleven graduates in the Class of 2018. The PhD candidates have accepted opportunities to teach and conduct research in prestigious institutions around the world, from George Mason University in Virginia to the University of South Wales in Australia. The PhD program continues to produce students who graduate with publications in top-tier journals, such as The Accounting Review, MIS Quarterly, Journal of Applied Psychology, and more.

The Executive DBA program applauds the 20 business leaders who successfully defended their dissertations in the second-ever DBA cohort. These alumni are just one example of our commitment to research with impact, as these students return to industry, not just as leaders, but as thought-leaders, ready to apply theory and research to business problems. This upcoming September, the Fox School will continue to demonstrate its leadership in the field as we host the 2018 Engaged Management Scholarship Conference, the premier meeting of executive DBA programs in the world.

Achievements in Research: Faculty Honored with Prestigious Awards

The world-class faculty at the Fox School has brought significant pride with many awards and achievements in research this year. The Office of Research applauds individuals such as In-Sue Oh, who was twice awarded the William A. Owns Scholarly Achievement Award for his significant contributions to the fields of HR and organizational behavior; Ram Mudambi, whose paper was one of eight to be selected the impactful paper in international entrepreneurship by the Journal of International Business Studies; and Thilo Kunkel, who is a 2018 North American Society for Sport Management Research Fellow in recognition of his contributions and achievements in sport-related scholarship.

These are just a few of the school’s achievements in research this year. Congratulations to all of the faculty for their numerous publications, citations, paper downloads, and grant awards. Learn more about the Fox School’s research impact.

Engaging Thought Leaders: Notable Events Highlighting Research

Through the year, faculty, staff, and students at the Fox School have worked tirelessly to create impactful, exciting events to showcase research and encourage collaboration. This year, the school hosted its semesterly Young Scholars Interdisciplinary Forum and the PhD Paper Competition, in which doctoral students and junior faculty present research concepts and solicit feedback.

The school also demonstrated its position as a thought leader in events throughout the year. The Translational Research Center hosted the inaugural 2018 Editors’ Summit, a first-of-its-kind forum that brought together editors-in-chief of leading academic business journals across multiple disciplines to discuss driving real impact with business scholarship. The Frederic Fox Lecture Series brought business executive and alumnus David Schoch, MBA ’78, previous chairman and CEO of Ford China, to discuss the implications on China in the international economy.

Congratulations to the students, faculty, and staff of the Fox School’s research community for a successful academic year!

Learn more about Fox School Research.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Eisenstadt in WSJ
Combatting sexual harassment can be a greater challenge for small firms than for their larger counterparts, a recent survey shows. The Wall Street Journal speaks with Fox’s Leora Eisenstadt, an expert on employee discrimination and discriminatory behavior in the workplace. Read more >>

Tackling stress for college students
Free pizza, therapy dogs, and an appearance from a member of the Philadelphia Eagles? An event centered on managing stress, and organized by students in a business honors course led by Fox’s Dr. Crystal Harold, earns publicity from NBC 10. Watch >>

Axelrod on NBC 10
As graduation draws near, NBC 10 focuses on a challenge that college graduates face: Debt. Fox’s Cindy Axelrod explains financial planning and the value of a college degree on an individual’s career earnings potential. Watch >>

Temple runs Broad Street (again)
Once again, the Temple-wide Broad Street Run team—led by Fox’s Michael McCloskey—contributed to Gamma Iota Sigma’s annual charity of choice. NBC 10 profiles McCloskey and the team, and a Fox alum shares how in a Philadelphia Inquirer op-ed how the Broad Street Run is more than a 10-mile race.

Philly I-Day recognizes Porat
Philly I-Day, celebrating the city’s risk management and insurance industry, recognizes Fox School Dean Dr. M. Moshe Porat as recipient of the 2018 Franklin Award for his lifetime achievement in the field. Industry news service A.M. Best speaks with Porat. Watch >>

Temple Now | May 1, 2018
Did you know the first Fly in 4 student is a Fox accounting major? Justin Grothmann’s story appears in the university’s newsletter. Read more >>

Temple Now | May 1, 2018
Last week, Fox’s Dr. Ram Mudambi moderated a Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce event focusing on innovation. Mudambi’s related research work earns publicity in the university’s newsletter. Read more >>

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | May 1, 2018
The CEO of a Pittsburgh-area corporation turned down a sizable compensation package because it was less than what he had requested, then resigned. Fox’s Dr. Steven Balsam, who has studied executive compensation, shares his expertise. Read more >>

Business Insurance | May 1, 2018
Fox’s M. Michael Zuckerman weighs in on the intersection between the insurance industry, the organizations associated with the NRA, and the risks related to those associations. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

STHM prof in USA Today
You’re traveling. You arrive at the hotel, in an unfamiliar city, and your reservation is nowhere to be found. Now what? STHM’s Michael Sheridan offers insight in a recent interview with USA Today. Read more >>

Inside Higher Ed explores groupwork
Groupwork has long served as a staple of education. But can that experience be replicated within online programs? Experts in online learning, including Fox’s Dr. Darin Kapanjie, weigh in. Read more >>

What is eSport’s future?
Experts predict that the eSport professional gaming industry could exceed $1.5 billion in revenue in the next two years. Last week, STHM hosted a conference focused on the phenomenon, and Dr. Daniel Funk speaks with Technically Philly. Read more >>

Are small brands overtaking bigger ones?
Marketing and retail trends seem to indicate this is the case. Fox’s Thomas Fung shares his expertise with The Philly Voice, in its weekly ‘Infrequently Asked Questions’ segment. Read more >>

Philly Voice | April 26, 2018
STHM’s Dr. Thilo Kunkel shares his research findings on football player branding and social media followership with Philly Voice. The research also receives publicity in Forbes. On the subject of arena renovations, Kunkel weighs in with Syracuse University’s The Daily Orange student newspaper.

6 ABC | April 27, 2018
Why are gas prices on the rise? Will drivers experience relief soon? Fox’s Dr. Sherry Jarrell has the answer. Watch >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

The Stone family is celebrating two new doctors.

Thomas W. Stone and Thomas J. Stone, father and son, both complete their doctoral programs this month, successfully defending their dissertations for Temple University’s Fox School and the College of Liberal Arts, respectively.

For many, completing a doctoral degree is a long, solitary process of researching and writing. For the Stones, while their research topics and processes were distinct, they experienced this journey together.

The elder Stone, graduating as part of the Fox School’s Executive Doctorate in Business Administration (DBA) 2018 cohort, completed his dissertation on the productivity of lean software development. Working alongside his cohort and with managers at his former company (previously Siemens Healthcare, now Cerner), Stone enjoyed his interacting with other business professionals in pursuit of his degree. “I began writing on this topic when I started in the DBA program three years ago and spent years developing it while working at Siemens,” says Stone. “The Fox School does a great job of building up to the dissertation.” He praises his advisor, Sudipta Basu, and his cohort classmates for their encouragement throughout the experience.

The younger Stone completed his doctoral degree in the College of Liberal Arts’ Department of Spanish and Portuguese. He studied how Latin American authors address historical events in their narratives and critique the “great man” theory, which treats the biography of notable men as the basis of history , under the guidance of his long-time advisor, Dr. Hortensia Morell. “These writers understand characters as part of both fiction and historical writing,” he says. The works are narratives about four Latin American individuals: Aztec emperor Montezuma, political leader Simón Bolívar, explorer Christopher Columbus, and revolutionary Che Guevara.

The pair empathized with each other’s experiences, understanding the challenges they faced and celebrating the completion of milestones. While they embarked on their own research journeys—father running field experiments and collecting and analyzing data, and son diving into literature with support from his advisor—the two shared a support system. “We both struggled to get through this,” says the father, “but we made it to the finish line together.”

The father’s pride is evident. He applauds the younger Stone’s success, praising his diligent work ethic in completing this accomplishment on his own terms. Both father and son will graduate together May 10 at Temple University’s 131st Commencement.

The elder Stone felt lucky to have his son go through this process with him. “He reminded me to order my cap and gown,” Stone laughs.

Learn more about the Fox School’s Executive Doctorate in Business Administration program.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

A murder — and a social media dilemma
In Allentown, a family uses Facebook to memorialize a deceased loved one. But that family member’s page features countless photos of the murderer. Despite requests from the family, Facebook’s policy leans toward preservation of the account as the deceased person left it. Fox’s Amy Lavin, an expert on social sentiment analysis, speaks with the Allentown Morning-Call. Read more >>

More commercials in your car?
With the advent (and increased use) of ride-sharing services, what does the future hold for in-car smartphone advertising? Fox’s Dr. Subodha Kumar, in an interview with national entertainment magazine Variety, explains data transmission and GPS pinpointing for more-tailored ads from advertisers. Read more >>

Two interviews with U.S. News
Do you need life insurance? Fox’s Michael McCloskey describes it as “the most overbought” form of coverage. And in another U.S. News & World Report story, Fox’s Dr. Janis Moore Campbell explains how critical thinking plays a role in supporting financial success.

Philadelphia Business Journal | April 19, 2018
Local companies and investors are jumping into Blockchain and related technological initiatives. Fox’s Dr. Bora Ozkan weighs in on Blockchain and other cryptocurrencies. Read more >>

Temple Now | April 19, 2018
Last week’s edition of the university e-newsletter sheds light on a Fox undergraduate carving out a career path in the music industry, as well as STHM’s upcoming eSports conference. Read more >>

Philadelphia Gay News | April 19, 2018
Will Pennsylvania’s lack of an anti-discrimination law affect Philadelphia’s chances of securing Amazon’s HQ2? Fox’s Dr. Jeffrey Boles offers his insights. Read more >>

American Banker | April 17, 2018
How do natural disasters impact small businesses and their lines of credit? American Banker speaks with Fox’s Dr. Benjamin Collier, highlighting his research work in this space. Read more >>

WalletHub | April 16, 2018
Fox’s Dr. Eric Eisenstein speaks with WalletHub about credit card rates. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.
Maureen (Mimi) Morrin

Maureen (Mimi) Morrin’s research path started with something many don’t like to think about: odors.

“As weird as it may sound,” says Morrin, “when I was in the doctoral program, I knew I wanted to do some scent research.” At the time, sensory marketing was not a term in research vernacular. In the last decade, however, Morrin has witnessed the growth of this field.

Understanding the Senses

What is it about holding a Starbucks cup that keeps customers coming back? How does the smell of a luxury car elicit an emotion? These are the types of questions Morrin and her associates explore as they determine how the senses drive consumers.

As founder and director of the Consumer Sensory Innovation Lab at the Fox School of Business, Morrin has established a collaborative setting for doctoral students, professors, and corporate managers to research the world of sight, sound, scent, taste, and touch as they relate to consumer influences. “I think that humans on some basic level need sensory input,” says Morrin. “It helps you make sense of your world—the senses tell you what’s what.”

Today, corporations want a deeper understanding of what exactly can attract customers to their stores—and what keeps them coming back. Her work with various retailers and consumer packaged goods companies has fostered growth within the center, which is funded in part by external grants. While Amazon and Jet.com are consuming more of the retail pie, Morrin says brick-and-mortar retailers have an edge when it comes to the shopping experience.

“Companies may ask, what is my competitive advantage when people can just buy my product on Amazon?” says Morrin. “But, they have the ability to impact all of our five senses—to delight us sensorially speaking.”

A Sense of Community

At the Fox School, Morrin works closely with a number of doctoral students and undergraduates. The Lab provides a venue for those who self-identify as sensory researchers and allows for information- and resource-sharing. Through projects that determine if a store’s messiness has an affect on sales or if mint-flavored snacks allay the guilt a dieter may feel on a cheat day; Morrin sees her collaborative lab as a safe zone.

“Being a doctoral student can be very stressful and you often feel isolated, because you’re essentially learning how to be an independent researcher,” says Morrin. “Those who have been in the program longer are able to help junior students—it makes them feel like they’re a part of something.”

Across All Boards

On days Morrin is not running sensory experiments or encouraging questions on consumer decisions in her class lectures, she is deeply involved in the research community. Earlier this year, Morrin was invited to join the editorial review boards of the Journal of Consumer Research and Journal of Consumer Affairs, and became an associate editor at the Journal of Consumer Psychology.

“I benefit from being a reviewer because I am able to see where the field is moving,” says Morrin. “The more reviewing you do, the better you get at detecting the bigger picture as a researcher.”

With a behind-the-scenes look at the evolution of marketing, Morrin has seen her unique interest in sensory inputs become a mainstream trend. Though she is excited that more people are studying the field, Morrin’s passion for sensory research is not a fad.

“Whether it’s in or out, I’m here to stay.”

Learn more about Fox School Research.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Fox School in Financial Times
Recently, business schools are weaving into their curriculum study in neuroscience. Fox’s Dr. Angelika Dimoka, the director of Temple’s Center for Neural Decision Making, speaks with Financial Times about Fox’s PhD program in this space. Read more>>

Leading by example
The Philadelphia Eagles’ Brandon Brooks, a Super Bowl champion, is also a champion of mental health awareness. Honors students in a leadership course led by Fox’s Dr. Crystal Harold invited Brooks to Alter Hall to speak with Fox students at a de-stress event. 6 ABC and student newspaper The Temple News provide coverage. Read more>>

‘Performing at the highest level’
Fox’s Dr. Crystal Harold is among the recipients of Temple University’s annual teaching, research, and creativity awards. Temple Now, the university’s weekly newsletter, announces all of the 2018 awardees. Read more>>

Technically Philly | April 9, 2018
Three leaders of a local venture firm—including its CEO—have stepped down recently, amid calls from its investor groups for speedier returns on its stake sell-offs. Fox’s Dr. TL Hill provides subject-matter expertise on these processes. Read more>>

The Legal Intelligencer | April 5, 2018
Fox’s James Lammendola contributes an op-ed to The Legal Intelligencer, detailing a nonprecedential opinion by the Superior Court. Read more>>

Sydney Morning Herald | April 3, 2018An editorial in Australia’s second-largest daily newspaper discusses the pitfalls of a current marketing strategy, and it cites the research work of Fox’s Dr. Joydeep Srivastava. Read more>>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

In the Venn Diagram of sociologists and international business researchers, Dr. Richard Deeg sits right in the middle.

This June, Dr. Deeg, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, will receive the Journal of International Business Studies Decade Award from the Academy of International Business for his 2008 paper that encouraged scholars to think about international business in a more holistic way.

“My interest in business has been within the political context,” says Deeg, formerly chair of the Department of Political Science. “I want to know how businesses are organized, regulated, and structured, and how this impacts other segments of society.”

Since 1996, the Decade Award has honored the most influential article in international business (IB) in the previous ten-year period. Dr. Deeg is the second Temple University researcher to receive the award, the first since Dr. Arvind Parkhe, Laura H. Carnell Professor and chair of the Department of Strategic Management in the Fox School, in 2001.

Deeg and his co-author, Gregory Jackson of the Free University of Berlin, compared two international business approaches in their paper, “Comparing capitalisms: understanding institutional diversity and its implications for international business.”

First, a variable-based approach, which was and remains common in IB literature, focuses on individual aspects of a country in order to understand how an outside firm may be affected. For example, executives may examine a country’s legal framework, which may not be as strong as in their home country or may favor different activities over others, to learn how it would impact decisions made in the new country.

Deeg presented “comparative capitalism” as an alternative viewpoint in IB, an approach frequently used in political science and sociology. “We were advocating a holistic approach,” says Deeg. “We said, don’t just compare property rights, and how they might be different and how that might affect our business. You also have to think about how the whole system in a different country works.”

The paper did not present one approach as superior than the other; rather, they were meant to be used as complementary. The variables-based approach, which using specific characteristics of an economic landscape, lends itself well to quantitative studies. The comparative capitalism approach, on the other hand, is helpful in understanding the way these institutions interact.

“Since 2008, there has been a lot more research in examining institutions,” says Ram Mudambi, Frank M. Speakman Professor of Strategy at the Fox School. “While it existed before this paper, it would be fair to say that institutional context has seen an increase in interest in IB literature over the last decade.”

Deeg uses his political science background to view the existing IB literature in a unique light, and he advises others to do the same. “My advice, particularly to young researchers, is to break outside your preordained professional circles and societies, and venture into ones that overlap.”

Since being named Dean of the College of Liberal Arts in September 2016, Deeg has recognized the value of translating research insights outside of academia.

“How do we take the ivory tower work we do and connect it to the city? The Fox School is certainly thinking that way, and we’re trying to invest as well,” says Deeg. “It’s a way to give back to the city, but it’s also a way to launch the students.”

Learn more about Fox School Research.

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Nobody likes a tattletale.

Since our days on elementary school playgrounds, we have been conditioned to avoid tattling. The possibility of being declared the class snitch has kept many school children’s lips tightly sealed—and, sadly, that attitude continues in the professional world today.

Dr. Leora Eisenstadt, assistant professor in the Department of Legal Studies at the Fox School of Business, once asked her undergraduate students in a business law and ethics class a simple question: Would they be willing to oust the firm they worked for, knowing there was fraudulent activity occurring?

Out of 22 students, only one said yes.

For the students who decided to stay quiet, their choice was not ddue to a lack of morality, but rather a fear of not recovering from the act of whistleblowing.

“Whistleblowing involves speaking out against an organization that you see doing something illegal, corrupt, or harmful to the general public,” says Eisenstadt. “Whistleblowers are often the subject of retaliation—once you come forward, you are likely to face termination or some other adverse employment action.”

Eisenstadt and co-author Dr. Jennifer Pacella of Baruch College confront the laws regarding whistleblowers in their paper, “Whistleblowers Need Not Apply,” which has been accepted for publication by the American Business Law Journal. Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, retaliation against someone who complains of discrimination is prohibited. In contrast, the “swiss cheese” laws covering whistleblowing often provide little to no protection for the tipsters, who are likely to be ostracized and blacklisted from their company or even industry after the story breaks.

After reviewing the Whistleblowers Protection Act, Dodd–Frank Act, Sarbanes–Oxley Act, and the False Claims Act, Eisenstadt and her co-author uncovered many of the loopholes that would inherently exclude whistleblowers from potential support. Although the laws prohibit retaliation to some extent, three out of four statutes do not protect whistleblowers from future employers’ prejudices.

While whistleblowers may be lauded by the public as a righteous and ethical individual who brought down a corrupt company, new employers are likely to see them as disloyal troublemakers.

“Beyond losing your job, the main reason people won’t come forward as whistleblowers is that they know they could be blackballed in the industry and face an extraordinarily difficult time finding future employment,” says Eisenstadt. “Sometimes, that is even more traumatizing than losing your present job.”

While anti-discrimination law clearly prohibits retaliation against job applicants, whistleblowers are typically left out in the rain. Eisenstadt and Pacella, in the first article to examine the lack of legal protections for whistleblowers who are applying for new jobs, propose a way to change that.

“We are arguing that Congress needs to step in and amend each of these federal statutes to provide protection for whistleblower applicants,” says Eisenstadt. “Our reform proposal is remarkably simple: take the language that’s in Title VII (and the decades of court interpretations that come with it) and add it to the whistleblower statutes.”

By adding the phrase “and job applicants,” Eisenstadt argues that this would end the problem of courts’ varying and unclear interpretations and create stronger protections for a vulnerable group. With clear statutory language detailing protections available to whistleblowers, courts can more fairly apply the law to the many types of whistleblowing cases that occur in both private and public settings.

“This is a problem that requires legislative action and not something the courts can do on their own,” says Eisenstadt.

With their hopes set to send their research to legislatures once published, the future of whistleblowers may become more positive—and maybe those 21 students who stayed quiet will eventually speak up.

Learn more about Fox School Research.
For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Inside Higher Ed quotes Fox prof
How can colleges and universities encourage even the most-resistant faculty members to digitize their in-classroom courses for online programs? Inside Higher Ed addresses this in a Q&A with national online-learning leaders, including Fox School’s Dr. Darin Kapanjie. Read more >>

Saxbys, STHM, and scholarships
Philadelphia Business Journal checks in with an update on the experiential-learning Saxbys café at STHM: The coffee and hospitality company announced a $60,000 contribution to the Saxbys Fellows Endowed Scholarship, to support future educational opportunities for STHM students. Read more >>

Gender equity in corporate settings
Did you know utility companies traditionally achieve a greater gender diversity in its corporate boards than boards in other industries? Explaining why is Fox School’s Dr. Steven Balsam, who studies—among other subjects—gender diversity on corporate boards. Read more >>

WalletHub | April 6, 2018
What’s the best credit card for travelers? STHM’s Michael Sheridan explains rewards and benefits options for hotels, airlines, and more. Read more >>

BusinessBecause | April 6, 2018
The online business publication profiles a Fox MBA alumnus who leveraged his experience and education to land a position at IBM. Read more >>

Media requests: Please send requests to Christopher A. Vito, associate director of communications & media relations, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, at cvito@temple.edu

For more stories and news, follow the Fox School on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Broad Street Run (Photo: Ryan S. Brandenberg)

A roundup of media mentions featuring faculty and staff from the Fox School of Business and the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management.

Running for a good cause
A university-wide Broad Street Run team, led by the Fox School’s Michael McCloskey and students from Gamma Iota Sigma, annually supports a charity of choice. This year’s organization, reports The Temple News, provides resources for local high school students battling anxiety and depression. Read more >>

Fox featured in University Business
The Fox School’s Stephen Boro describes the school’s efforts to break down data silos to achieve admissions and recruitment success. The result, says Boro? Fox “has access to better and more useful admissions information than ever before.” Read more >>

Feeding those in need
Last week, Fox School SPOs united to collect food for the university’s Cherry Pantry—an initiative to combat food insecurity and allow students to take food anonymously.  Read more >>

Arkansas Business | March 19, 2018
Dollar stores tend to thrive in a depressed economy and in low-income communities, says the Fox School’s Dr. Jay Sinha, who has conducted research on the dollar-store phenomenon.

Captive Insurance Times | March 14, 2018
The Fox School’s M. Michael Zuckerman offers a solution to the talent gap in the insurance industry. Read more >>

Temple Now | March 22, 2018
A program led annually by the Fox School’s Dr. Steven Balsam aligns accounting students with members of the local community to file their tax returns free of charge. The university’s e-newsletter provides coverage. Read more >>

Temple Now | March 29, 2018
A recent gift to the Fox School by MBA alumni Stanley and Franny Wang receives mention in the university’s e-newsletter. Read more >>

Philadelphia Business Journal | Jan. 18, 2018
Earlier this year, a woman-owned advertising agency sold after 40 years. Fox’s Dr. Susan Mudambi explains the decision. Read more >>

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